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Peter
2020-09-10 13:32:38 UTC
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Permalink
I'd ask this in one of the local.london ngs, but they seem to be
defunct. Apparently there are still a few gas street lamps around, and
apparently some of them are in fair London town, and maybe they're lit
around Christmas time.

Does anyrat know where these lights are, and will they be lit around
Christmas time?

If, come Christmas, we're out from under the Covid thumb, I might go and
look. And possibly even vice versa.
Mike
2020-09-10 14:01:07 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Peter
I'd ask this in one of the local.london ngs, but they seem to be
defunct. Apparently there are still a few gas street lamps around, and
apparently some of them are in fair London town, and maybe they're lit
around Christmas time.
Does anyrat know where these lights are, and will they be lit around
Christmas time?
If, come Christmas, we're out from under the Covid thumb, I might go and
look. And possibly even vice versa.
A question for Darles Chickens?
--
Toodle Pip
Peter
2020-09-10 14:11:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by Peter
I'd ask this in one of the local.london ngs, but they seem to be
defunct. Apparently there are still a few gas street lamps around, and
apparently some of them are in fair London town, and maybe they're lit
around Christmas time.
Does anyrat know where these lights are, and will they be lit around
Christmas time?
If, come Christmas, we're out from under the Covid thumb, I might go and
look. And possibly even vice versa.
A question for Darles Chickens?
Are you egging me on?
krw
2020-09-10 14:34:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter
Post by Mike
Post by Peter
I'd ask this in one of the local.london ngs, but they seem to be
defunct.  Apparently there are still a few gas street lamps around, and
apparently some of them are in fair London town, and maybe they're lit
around Christmas time.
Does anyrat know where these lights are, and will they be lit around
Christmas time?
If, come Christmas, we're out from under the Covid thumb, I might go and
look.  And possibly even vice versa.
A question for Darles Chickens?
Are you egging me on?
That is a good yolk.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Peter
2020-09-10 14:56:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by krw
Post by Peter
Post by Mike
Post by Peter
I'd ask this in one of the local.london ngs, but they seem to be
defunct.  Apparently there are still a few gas street lamps around, and
apparently some of them are in fair London town, and maybe they're lit
around Christmas time.
Does anyrat know where these lights are, and will they be lit around
Christmas time?
If, come Christmas, we're out from under the Covid thumb, I might go and
look.  And possibly even vice versa.
A question for Darles Chickens?
Are you egging me on?
That is a good yolk.
Everything it's cracked up to be!
Joe Kerr
2020-09-10 20:54:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter
Post by krw
Post by Peter
Post by Mike
Post by Peter
I'd ask this in one of the local.london ngs, but they seem to be
defunct.  Apparently there are still a few gas street lamps around, and
apparently some of them are in fair London town, and maybe they're lit
around Christmas time.
Does anyrat know where these lights are, and will they be lit around
Christmas time?
If, come Christmas, we're out from under the Covid thumb, I might go and
look.  And possibly even vice versa.
A question for Darles Chickens?
Are you egging me on?
That is a good yolk.
Everything it's cracked up to be!
I was hoping to ovoid another eggscruciating pun thread.
--
Ric
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-09-10 21:01:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Joe Kerr
Post by Peter
Post by krw
Post by Peter
Post by Mike
Post by Peter
I'd ask this in one of the local.london ngs, but they seem to be
defunct.  Apparently there are still a few gas street lamps
around, and
apparently some of them are in fair London town, and maybe they're lit
around Christmas time.
Does anyrat know where these lights are, and will they be lit around
Christmas time?
If, come Christmas, we're out from under the Covid thumb, I might go and
look.  And possibly even vice versa.
Would Vice Versa mean if we aren't out of covid, the gas lamps will come
to look at you?

In the 1960s, our quarters were in a rather posh suburb of Dortmund
(Gartenstadt), that I'm pretty sure still _did_ have gas streetlamps.
Post by Joe Kerr
Post by Peter
Post by krw
Post by Peter
Post by Mike
A question for Darles Chickens?
Are you egging me on?
That is a good yolk.
Everything it's cracked up to be!
I was hoping to ovoid another eggscruciating pun thread.
A forlorn hope in UMRA (-:
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Odds are, the phrase "It's none of my business" will be followed by "but".
BrritSki
2020-09-11 07:22:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Joe Kerr
I was hoping to ovoid another eggscruciating pun thread.
In the pirate ship tree house in Ceriana I had a stuffed parrot called
Pieces and her egg, Ovate. Not many people know that...
Penny
2020-09-10 15:50:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 10 Sep 2020 14:01:07 GMT, Mike <***@ntlworld.com> scrawled
in the dust...
Post by Peter
I'd ask this in one of the local.london ngs, but they seem to be
defunct. Apparently there are still a few gas street lamps around, and
apparently some of them are in fair London town, and maybe they're lit
around Christmas time.
Does anyrat know where these lights are, and will they be lit around
Christmas time?
There are still a few Webb sewer gas extractor and destructor lamps in
Sheffield, Whitley Bay, Morpeth, Seaton Delaval, and Ripon (they no longer
run on sewer gas). Apparently there are two on the Great West Road in
Isleworth but they no longer have lamps on top. The one in Carting Lane WC2
still works with its original lamp and burners.

There are some in South Wales and Durham but I don't think they have
working lamps now.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Peter
2020-09-10 15:55:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
in the dust...
Post by Peter
I'd ask this in one of the local.london ngs, but they seem to be
defunct. Apparently there are still a few gas street lamps around, and
apparently some of them are in fair London town, and maybe they're lit
around Christmas time.
Does anyrat know where these lights are, and will they be lit around
Christmas time?
There are still a few Webb sewer gas extractor and destructor lamps in
Sheffield, Whitley Bay, Morpeth, Seaton Delaval, and Ripon (they no longer
run on sewer gas). Apparently there are two on the Great West Road in
Isleworth but they no longer have lamps on top. The one in Carting Lane WC2
still works with its original lamp and burners.
There are some in South Wales and Durham but I don't think they have
working lamps now.
Thank you, lady of the lamps.
Steve Hague
2020-09-11 10:47:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
in the dust...
Post by Peter
I'd ask this in one of the local.london ngs, but they seem to be
defunct. Apparently there are still a few gas street lamps around, and
apparently some of them are in fair London town, and maybe they're lit
around Christmas time.
Does anyrat know where these lights are, and will they be lit around
Christmas time?
There are still a few Webb sewer gas extractor and destructor lamps in
Sheffield, Whitley Bay, Morpeth, Seaton Delaval, and Ripon (they no longer
run on sewer gas). Apparently there are two on the Great West Road in
Isleworth but they no longer have lamps on top. The one in Carting Lane WC2
still works with its original lamp and burners.
There are some in South Wales and Durham but I don't think they have
working lamps now.
I live in the town where gas lighting was invented. We have an annual
day of celebration for the man responsible, William Murdoch. There's not
a single gas lamp in Redruth now though, which is perhaps a good thing.
Steve
Mike
2020-09-11 11:01:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Penny
in the dust...
Post by Peter
I'd ask this in one of the local.london ngs, but they seem to be
defunct. Apparently there are still a few gas street lamps around, and
apparently some of them are in fair London town, and maybe they're lit
around Christmas time.
Does anyrat know where these lights are, and will they be lit around
Christmas time?
There are still a few Webb sewer gas extractor and destructor lamps in
Sheffield, Whitley Bay, Morpeth, Seaton Delaval, and Ripon (they no longer
run on sewer gas). Apparently there are two on the Great West Road in
Isleworth but they no longer have lamps on top. The one in Carting Lane WC2
still works with its original lamp and burners.
There are some in South Wales and Durham but I don't think they have
working lamps now.
I live in the town where gas lighting was invented. We have an annual
day of celebration for the man responsible, William Murdoch. There's not
a single gas lamp in Redruth now though, which is perhaps a good thing.
Steve
Have they all been dis-mantled?
--
Toodle Pip
Peter
2020-09-11 11:05:29 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Penny
in the dust...
Post by Peter
I'd ask this in one of the local.london ngs, but they seem to be
defunct.  Apparently there are still a few gas street lamps around, and
apparently some of them are in fair London town, and maybe they're lit
around Christmas time.
Does anyrat know where these lights are, and will they be lit around
Christmas time?
There are still a few Webb sewer gas extractor and destructor lamps in
Sheffield, Whitley Bay, Morpeth, Seaton Delaval, and Ripon (they no longer
run on sewer gas). Apparently there are two on the Great West Road in
Isleworth but they no longer have lamps on top. The one in Carting Lane WC2
still works with its original lamp and burners.
There are some in South Wales and Durham but I don't think they have
working lamps now.
I live in the town where gas lighting was invented. We have an annual
day of celebration for the man responsible, William Murdoch. There's not
a single gas lamp in Redruth now though, which is perhaps a good thing.
Steve
He's one of the heroes of where I come from (Brum) along with Boulton
and Watt. That would have been coal gas, I suppose.
Mike
2020-09-11 11:34:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Penny
in the dust...
Post by Peter
I'd ask this in one of the local.london ngs, but they seem to be
defunct.  Apparently there are still a few gas street lamps around, and
apparently some of them are in fair London town, and maybe they're lit
around Christmas time.
Does anyrat know where these lights are, and will they be lit around
Christmas time?
There are still a few Webb sewer gas extractor and destructor lamps in
Sheffield, Whitley Bay, Morpeth, Seaton Delaval, and Ripon (they no longer
run on sewer gas). Apparently there are two on the Great West Road in
Isleworth but they no longer have lamps on top. The one in Carting Lane WC2
still works with its original lamp and burners.
There are some in South Wales and Durham but I don't think they have
working lamps now.
I live in the town where gas lighting was invented. We have an annual
day of celebration for the man responsible, William Murdoch. There's not
a single gas lamp in Redruth now though, which is perhaps a good thing.
Steve
He's one of the heroes of where I come from (Brum) along with Boulton
and Watt. That would have been coal gas, I suppose.
Also referred to as ‘Town Gas’ after the gas had been extracted from the
coal, the remaining mass was known as ‘Coke’ (not for drinking of course)
and I recall our boarding school heating furnaces were fuelled with tons of
the stuff and us lads used to take it in turns to wheel wheel barrow-loads
from the stoke hole to the furnaces. Oh happy days!
--
Toodle Pip
Peter
2020-09-11 12:02:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by Peter
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Penny
in the dust...
Post by Peter
I'd ask this in one of the local.london ngs, but they seem to be
defunct.  Apparently there are still a few gas street lamps around, and
apparently some of them are in fair London town, and maybe they're lit
around Christmas time.
Does anyrat know where these lights are, and will they be lit around
Christmas time?
There are still a few Webb sewer gas extractor and destructor lamps in
Sheffield, Whitley Bay, Morpeth, Seaton Delaval, and Ripon (they no longer
run on sewer gas). Apparently there are two on the Great West Road in
Isleworth but they no longer have lamps on top. The one in Carting Lane WC2
still works with its original lamp and burners.
There are some in South Wales and Durham but I don't think they have
working lamps now.
I live in the town where gas lighting was invented. We have an annual
day of celebration for the man responsible, William Murdoch. There's not
a single gas lamp in Redruth now though, which is perhaps a good thing.
Steve
He's one of the heroes of where I come from (Brum) along with Boulton
and Watt. That would have been coal gas, I suppose.
Also referred to as ‘Town Gas’ after the gas had been extracted from the
coal, the remaining mass was known as ‘Coke’ (not for drinking of course)
and I recall our boarding school heating furnaces were fuelled with tons of
the stuff and us lads used to take it in turns to wheel wheel barrow-loads
from the stoke hole to the furnaces. Oh happy days!
I don't think I've seen a coke fire for a long time, but I can recall
their characteristic smell, and one used to see workmen and night
watchmen warming themselves at braziers. (Or brassieres? Spelling is
not my strong point.)
Mike
2020-09-11 12:13:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter
Post by Mike
Post by Peter
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Penny
in the dust...
Post by Peter
I'd ask this in one of the local.london ngs, but they seem to be
defunct.  Apparently there are still a few gas street lamps around, and
apparently some of them are in fair London town, and maybe they're lit
around Christmas time.
Does anyrat know where these lights are, and will they be lit around
Christmas time?
There are still a few Webb sewer gas extractor and destructor lamps in
Sheffield, Whitley Bay, Morpeth, Seaton Delaval, and Ripon (they no longer
run on sewer gas). Apparently there are two on the Great West Road in
Isleworth but they no longer have lamps on top. The one in Carting Lane WC2
still works with its original lamp and burners.
There are some in South Wales and Durham but I don't think they have
working lamps now.
I live in the town where gas lighting was invented. We have an annual
day of celebration for the man responsible, William Murdoch. There's not
a single gas lamp in Redruth now though, which is perhaps a good thing.
Steve
He's one of the heroes of where I come from (Brum) along with Boulton
and Watt. That would have been coal gas, I suppose.
Also referred to as ‘Town Gas’ after the gas had been extracted from the
coal, the remaining mass was known as ‘Coke’ (not for drinking of course)
and I recall our boarding school heating furnaces were fuelled with tons of
the stuff and us lads used to take it in turns to wheel wheel barrow-loads
from the stoke hole to the furnaces. Oh happy days!
I don't think I've seen a coke fire for a long time, but I can recall
their characteristic smell, and one used to see workmen and night
watchmen warming themselves at braziers. (Or brassieres? Spelling is
not my strong point.)
I suspect that coke might well have been secreted in brassieres at some
time.
--
Toodle Pip
Peter
2020-09-11 12:33:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by Peter
Post by Mike
Post by Peter
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Penny
in the dust...
Post by Peter
I'd ask this in one of the local.london ngs, but they seem to be
defunct.  Apparently there are still a few gas street lamps around, and
apparently some of them are in fair London town, and maybe they're lit
around Christmas time.
Does anyrat know where these lights are, and will they be lit around
Christmas time?
There are still a few Webb sewer gas extractor and destructor lamps in
Sheffield, Whitley Bay, Morpeth, Seaton Delaval, and Ripon (they no longer
run on sewer gas). Apparently there are two on the Great West Road in
Isleworth but they no longer have lamps on top. The one in Carting Lane WC2
still works with its original lamp and burners.
There are some in South Wales and Durham but I don't think they have
working lamps now.
I live in the town where gas lighting was invented. We have an annual
day of celebration for the man responsible, William Murdoch. There's not
a single gas lamp in Redruth now though, which is perhaps a good thing.
Steve
He's one of the heroes of where I come from (Brum) along with Boulton
and Watt. That would have been coal gas, I suppose.
Also referred to as ‘Town Gas’ after the gas had been extracted from the
coal, the remaining mass was known as ‘Coke’ (not for drinking of course)
and I recall our boarding school heating furnaces were fuelled with tons of
the stuff and us lads used to take it in turns to wheel wheel barrow-loads
from the stoke hole to the furnaces. Oh happy days!
I don't think I've seen a coke fire for a long time, but I can recall
their characteristic smell, and one used to see workmen and night
watchmen warming themselves at braziers. (Or brassieres? Spelling is
not my strong point.)
I suspect that coke might well have been secreted in brassieres at some
time.
Snell-like sniff.
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-09-13 10:05:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
[]
Post by Peter
Post by Mike
Post by Peter
Post by Mike
Post by Peter
He's one of the heroes of where I come from (Brum) along with Boulton
and Watt. That would have been coal gas, I suppose.
(I would imagine so. I don't _think_ anyone used "natural gas" before
the big changeover in the 1970s; I'm not sure where anyone'd have
obtained it under pressure. Natural gas - methane - was more a hazard
than useful, as "marsh gas" - on, well, marshes, and "firedamp" in
mines.)
Post by Peter
Post by Mike
Post by Peter
Post by Mike
Also referred to as ‘Town Gas’ after the gas had been extracted from the
coal, the remaining mass was known as ‘Coke’ (not for drinking of course)
and I recall our boarding school heating furnaces were fuelled with tons of
the stuff and us lads used to take it in turns to wheel wheel barrow-loads
from the stoke hole to the furnaces. Oh happy days!
My school (Barnard Castle School!) used to get through a ton (I think of
coal rather than coke) - I can't remember whether a day or a week. They
converted to a much more modern and cleaner oil-fired system. Just in
time for the oil crisis! (I'm pretty sure there was no use of boys to
move the coal around, though.)
Post by Peter
Post by Mike
Post by Peter
I don't think I've seen a coke fire for a long time, but I can recall
their characteristic smell, and one used to see workmen and night
watchmen warming themselves at braziers. (Or brassieres? Spelling is
not my strong point.)
I'm sure men have been known to warm their hands on brassieres, but that
wasn't their primary reason for putting them there ...
Post by Peter
Post by Mike
I suspect that coke might well have been secreted in brassieres at some
time.
Snell-like sniff.
I don't think Lynda ever indulged in that, sniffer though she is ...
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

There's never enough time to do all the nothing you want.
CALVIN AND HOBBES, according to a @qikipedia tweet 2019-9-9.
Rosalind Mitchell
2020-09-13 11:29:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
My school (Barnard Castle School!) used to get through a ton (I think of
coal rather than coke) - I can't remember whether a day or a week.
Really? I just can't see that.

R
BrritSki
2020-09-13 11:30:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
My school (Barnard Castle School!) used to get through a ton (I think
of coal rather than coke) - I can't remember whether a day or a week.
Really? I just can't see that.
Well of course you can't from there - you'll need to drive closer.
Mike
2020-09-13 12:58:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by BrritSki
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
My school (Barnard Castle School!) used to get through a ton (I think
of coal rather than coke) - I can't remember whether a day or a week.
Really? I just can't see that.
Well of course you can't from there - you'll need to drive closer.
Not so much Snell - more Snellen then.
--
Toodle Pip
Peter
2020-09-13 12:09:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
My school (Barnard Castle School!) used to get through a ton (I think
of coal rather than coke) - I can't remember whether a day or a week.
Really? I just can't see that.
Growing children have big appetites.
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
R
Peter
2020-09-13 12:06:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Peter
Post by Mike
Post by Peter
Post by Mike
Post by Peter
He's one of the heroes of where I come from (Brum) along with Boulton
and Watt.  That would have been coal gas, I suppose.
(I would imagine so. I don't _think_ anyone used "natural gas" before
the big changeover in the 1970s;
I was thinking about sewer gas.
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I'm not sure where anyone'd have
obtained it under pressure. Natural gas - methane - was more a hazard
than useful, as "marsh gas" - on, well, marshes, and "firedamp" in mines.)
Post by Peter
Post by Mike
Post by Peter
Post by Mike
Also referred to as ‘Town Gas’ after the gas had been extracted from the
coal, the remaining mass was known as ‘Coke’ (not for drinking of course)
and I recall our boarding school heating furnaces were fuelled with tons of
the stuff and us lads used to take it in turns to wheel wheel barrow-loads
from the stoke hole to the furnaces. Oh happy days!
My school (Barnard Castle School!) used to get through a ton (I think of
coal rather than coke) - I can't remember whether a day or a week. They
converted to a much more modern and cleaner oil-fired system. Just in
time for the oil crisis! (I'm pretty sure there was no use of boys to
move the coal around, though.)
Post by Peter
Post by Mike
Post by Peter
I don't think I've seen a coke fire for a long time, but I can recall
their characteristic smell, and one used to see workmen and night
watchmen warming themselves at braziers.  (Or brassieres?  Spelling is
not my strong point.)
I'm sure men have been known to warm their hands on brassieres, but that
wasn't their primary reason for putting them there ...
Post by Peter
Post by Mike
I suspect that coke might well have been secreted in brassieres at some
time.
Snell-like sniff.
I don't think Lynda ever indulged in that, sniffer though she is ...
Mike
2020-09-13 12:58:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Peter
Post by Mike
Post by Peter
Post by Mike
Post by Peter
He's one of the heroes of where I come from (Brum) along with Boulton
and Watt. That would have been coal gas, I suppose.
(I would imagine so. I don't _think_ anyone used "natural gas" before
the big changeover in the 1970s; I'm not sure where anyone'd have
obtained it under pressure. Natural gas - methane - was more a hazard
than useful, as "marsh gas" - on, well, marshes, and "firedamp" in
mines.)
Post by Peter
Post by Mike
Post by Peter
Post by Mike
Also referred to as ‘Town Gas’ after the gas had been extracted from the
coal, the remaining mass was known as ‘Coke’ (not for drinking of course)
and I recall our boarding school heating furnaces were fuelled with tons of
the stuff and us lads used to take it in turns to wheel wheel barrow-loads
from the stoke hole to the furnaces. Oh happy days!
My school (Barnard Castle School!) used to get through a ton (I think of
coal rather than coke) - I can't remember whether a day or a week. They
converted to a much more modern and cleaner oil-fired system. Just in
time for the oil crisis! (I'm pretty sure there was no use of boys to
move the coal around, though.)
Post by Peter
Post by Mike
Post by Peter
I don't think I've seen a coke fire for a long time, but I can recall
their characteristic smell, and one used to see workmen and night
watchmen warming themselves at braziers. (Or brassieres? Spelling is
not my strong point.)
I'm sure men have been known to warm their hands on brassieres, but that
wasn't their primary reason for putting them there ...
Post by Peter
Post by Mike
I suspect that coke might well have been secreted in brassieres at some
time.
Snell-like sniff.
I don't think Lynda ever indulged in that, sniffer though she is ...
Nor Robert (apparently) ;-)))
--
Toodle Pip
Steve Hague
2020-09-13 18:23:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Peter
Post by Mike
Post by Peter
Post by Mike
Post by Peter
He's one of the heroes of where I come from (Brum) along with Boulton
and Watt. That would have been coal gas, I suppose.
(I would imagine so. I don't _think_ anyone used "natural gas" before
the big changeover in the 1970s; I'm not sure where anyone'd have
obtained it under pressure. Natural gas - methane - was more a hazard
than useful, as "marsh gas" - on, well, marshes, and "firedamp" in
mines.)
Post by Peter
Post by Mike
Post by Peter
Post by Mike
Also referred to as ‘Town Gas’ after the gas had been extracted from the
coal, the remaining mass was known as ‘Coke’ (not for drinking of course)
and I recall our boarding school heating furnaces were fuelled with tons of
the stuff and us lads used to take it in turns to wheel wheel barrow-loads
from the stoke hole to the furnaces. Oh happy days!
My school (Barnard Castle School!) used to get through a ton (I think of
coal rather than coke) - I can't remember whether a day or a week. They
converted to a much more modern and cleaner oil-fired system. Just in
time for the oil crisis! (I'm pretty sure there was no use of boys to
move the coal around, though.)
Post by Peter
Post by Mike
Post by Peter
I don't think I've seen a coke fire for a long time, but I can recall
their characteristic smell, and one used to see workmen and night
watchmen warming themselves at braziers. (Or brassieres? Spelling is
not my strong point.)
I'm sure men have been known to warm their hands on brassieres, but that
wasn't their primary reason for putting them there ...
Post by Peter
Post by Mike
I suspect that coke might well have been secreted in brassieres at some
time.
Snell-like sniff.
I don't think Lynda ever indulged in that, sniffer though she is ...
Nor Robert (apparently) ;-)))
Perhaps if the lines were properly arranged?
Nick Odell
2020-09-13 21:02:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sun, 13 Sep 2020 19:23:36 +0100, Steve Hague
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Mike
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Peter
Post by Mike
Post by Peter
Post by Peter
He's one of the heroes of where I come from (Brum) along with Boulton
and Watt. That would have been coal gas, I suppose.
(I would imagine so. I don't _think_ anyone used "natural gas" before
the big changeover in the 1970s; I'm not sure where anyone'd have
obtained it under pressure. Natural gas - methane - was more a hazard
than useful, as "marsh gas" - on, well, marshes, and "firedamp" in
mines.)
Post by Peter
Post by Mike
Post by Peter
Also referred to as ‘Town Gas’ after the gas had been extracted
from the
coal, the remaining mass was known as ‘Coke’ (not for drinking
of course)
and I recall our boarding school heating furnaces were fuelled with tons of
the stuff and us lads used to take it in turns to wheel wheel barrow-loads
from the stoke hole to the furnaces. Oh happy days!
My school (Barnard Castle School!) used to get through a ton (I think of
coal rather than coke) - I can't remember whether a day or a week. They
converted to a much more modern and cleaner oil-fired system. Just in
time for the oil crisis! (I'm pretty sure there was no use of boys to
move the coal around, though.)
Post by Peter
Post by Mike
Post by Peter
I don't think I've seen a coke fire for a long time, but I can recall
their characteristic smell, and one used to see workmen and night
watchmen warming themselves at braziers. (Or brassieres? Spelling is
not my strong point.)
I'm sure men have been known to warm their hands on brassieres, but that
wasn't their primary reason for putting them there ...
Post by Peter
Post by Mike
I suspect that coke might well have been secreted in brassieres at some
time.
Snell-like sniff.
I don't think Lynda ever indulged in that, sniffer though she is ...
Nor Robert (apparently) ;-)))
Perhaps if the lines were properly arranged?
How do people manage nowadays? Now that the banknotes are all polymer?

Nick

Sam Plusnet
2020-09-13 20:18:30 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
(I would imagine so. I don't _think_ anyone used "natural gas" before
the big changeover in the 1970s;
And not even then, since the buzz words were "North Sea Gas".

At the time the changeover was taking place we tended to move quite
frequently (in a manner common to students), and ended up going through
the process three times.
--
Sam Plusnet
John Ashby
2020-09-11 12:22:14 UTC
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Post by Peter
Post by Mike
Post by Peter
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Penny
in the dust...
Post by Peter
I'd ask this in one of the local.london ngs, but they seem to be
defunct.  Apparently there are still a few gas street lamps around, and
apparently some of them are in fair London town, and maybe they're lit
around Christmas time.
Does anyrat know where these lights are, and will they be lit around
Christmas time?
There are still a few Webb sewer gas extractor and destructor lamps in
Sheffield, Whitley Bay, Morpeth, Seaton Delaval, and Ripon (they no longer
run on sewer gas). Apparently there are two on the Great West Road in
Isleworth but they no longer have lamps on top. The one in Carting Lane WC2
still works with its original lamp and burners.
There are some in South Wales and Durham but I don't think they have
working lamps now.
I live in the town where gas lighting was invented. We have an annual
day of celebration for the man responsible, William Murdoch. There's not
a single gas lamp in Redruth now though, which is perhaps a good thing.
Steve
He's one of the heroes of where I come from (Brum) along with Boulton
and Watt.  That would have been coal gas, I suppose.
Also referred to as ‘Town Gas’ after the gas had been extracted from the
coal, the remaining mass was known as ‘Coke’ (not for drinking of course)
and I recall our boarding school heating furnaces were fuelled with tons of
the stuff and us lads used to take it in turns to wheel wheel
barrow-loads
from the stoke hole to the furnaces. Oh happy days!
I don't think I've seen a coke fire for a long time, but I can recall
their characteristic smell, and one used to see workmen and night
watchmen warming themselves at braziers.  (Or brassieres?  Spelling is
not my strong point.)
No, brassieres (at least the ones worn by cinema ice cream sellers) are
electrically heated. When I found that out I was shocked.

john
Peter
2020-09-11 12:36:14 UTC
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Permalink
Post by John Ashby
Post by Peter
Post by Mike
Post by Peter
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Penny
in the dust...
Post by Peter
I'd ask this in one of the local.london ngs, but they seem to be
defunct.  Apparently there are still a few gas street lamps around, and
apparently some of them are in fair London town, and maybe they're lit
around Christmas time.
Does anyrat know where these lights are, and will they be lit around
Christmas time?
There are still a few Webb sewer gas extractor and destructor lamps in
Sheffield, Whitley Bay, Morpeth, Seaton Delaval, and Ripon (they no longer
run on sewer gas). Apparently there are two on the Great West Road in
Isleworth but they no longer have lamps on top. The one in Carting Lane WC2
still works with its original lamp and burners.
There are some in South Wales and Durham but I don't think they have
working lamps now.
I live in the town where gas lighting was invented. We have an annual
day of celebration for the man responsible, William Murdoch. There's not
a single gas lamp in Redruth now though, which is perhaps a good thing.
Steve
He's one of the heroes of where I come from (Brum) along with Boulton
and Watt.  That would have been coal gas, I suppose.
Also referred to as ‘Town Gas’ after the gas had been extracted from the
coal, the remaining mass was known as ‘Coke’ (not for drinking of course)
and I recall our boarding school heating furnaces were fuelled with tons of
the stuff and us lads used to take it in turns to wheel wheel barrow-loads
from the stoke hole to the furnaces. Oh happy days!
I don't think I've seen a coke fire for a long time, but I can recall
their characteristic smell, and one used to see workmen and night
watchmen warming themselves at braziers.  (Or brassieres?  Spelling is
not my strong point.)
No, brassieres (at least the ones worn by cinema ice cream sellers) are
electrically heated. When I found that out I was shocked.
I hope the ice cream wasn't melted.
Post by John Ashby
john
Mike
2020-09-11 12:40:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by John Ashby
Post by Peter
Post by Mike
Post by Peter
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Penny
in the dust...
Post by Peter
I'd ask this in one of the local.london ngs, but they seem to be
defunct.  Apparently there are still a few gas street lamps around, and
apparently some of them are in fair London town, and maybe they're lit
around Christmas time.
Does anyrat know where these lights are, and will they be lit around
Christmas time?
There are still a few Webb sewer gas extractor and destructor lamps in
Sheffield, Whitley Bay, Morpeth, Seaton Delaval, and Ripon (they no longer
run on sewer gas). Apparently there are two on the Great West Road in
Isleworth but they no longer have lamps on top. The one in Carting Lane WC2
still works with its original lamp and burners.
There are some in South Wales and Durham but I don't think they have
working lamps now.
I live in the town where gas lighting was invented. We have an annual
day of celebration for the man responsible, William Murdoch. There's not
a single gas lamp in Redruth now though, which is perhaps a good thing.
Steve
He's one of the heroes of where I come from (Brum) along with Boulton
and Watt.  That would have been coal gas, I suppose.
Also referred to as ‘Town Gas’ after the gas had been extracted from the
coal, the remaining mass was known as ‘Coke’ (not for drinking of course)
and I recall our boarding school heating furnaces were fuelled with tons of
the stuff and us lads used to take it in turns to wheel wheel barrow-loads
from the stoke hole to the furnaces. Oh happy days!
I don't think I've seen a coke fire for a long time, but I can recall
their characteristic smell, and one used to see workmen and night
watchmen warming themselves at braziers.  (Or brassieres?  Spelling is
not my strong point.)
No, brassieres (at least the ones worn by cinema ice cream sellers) are
electrically heated. When I found that out I was shocked.
john
Perhaps you should have let them dry out more after laundering them!

But.... really???
--
Toodle Pip
Penny
2020-09-11 13:09:38 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Fri, 11 Sep 2020 13:22:14 +0100, John Ashby <***@yahoo.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by John Ashby
No, brassieres (at least the ones worn by cinema ice cream sellers) are
electrically heated. When I found that out I was shocked.
Is that how you found out?
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-09-13 10:06:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Fri, 11 Sep 2020 at 13:22:14, John Ashby <***@yahoo.com>
wrote:
[]
Post by John Ashby
No, brassieres (at least the ones worn by cinema ice cream sellers) are
electrically heated. When I found that out I was shocked.
john
Groan (-: [×2]
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

There's never enough time to do all the nothing you want.
CALVIN AND HOBBES, according to a @qikipedia tweet 2019-9-9.
Chris J Dixon
2020-09-13 14:41:22 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Peter
I don't think I've seen a coke fire for a long time, but I can recall
their characteristic smell,
When the coal fire ban came in, my parents' solid fuel deliveries
were changed to coke. The load was tipped in the drive, and I
shoveled it into the cellar. I can still recall the sulphurous
smell rising from it as it was disturbed.

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk @ChrisJDixon1
Plant amazing Acers.
Mike
2020-09-13 16:23:51 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by Peter
I don't think I've seen a coke fire for a long time, but I can recall
their characteristic smell,
When the coal fire ban came in, my parents' solid fuel deliveries
were changed to coke. The load was tipped in the drive, and I
shoveled it into the cellar. I can still recall the sulphurous
smell rising from it as it was disturbed.
Chris
I was living in Yeovil at the time of attending my first 3 schools (aged 5
- 9) and remember walking home from school in the Autumn when fires were
being lit and smoke billowed from house’s chimneys; mustard / brown smoke
drifted down wind and assailed one’s nostrils. This would have been 1952 -
56 before ‘smokeless’ fuels were introduced for domestic use.

In later years we had a ‘moddun’ burner installed that heated water and the
room; this was an Esse Autovector and was fuelled with anthracite, gravity
fed from a hopper above the fire grate part and was filled each day. I
recall from about 1954, our council house hot water heating arrangements
required a fire in the grate - even in a heatwave. :-( a year or two later,
we had an immersion heater fitted in the hot water cylinder.)
--
Toodle Pip
Rosalind Mitchell
2020-09-13 12:25:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike
coal, the remaining mass was known as ‘Coke’ (not for drinking of course)
Of course it isn't. It's for snorting up the nostrils to smooth the
operation of the financial markets.

R
Sam Plusnet
2020-09-10 20:33:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter
I'd ask this in one of the local.london ngs, but they seem to be
defunct.  Apparently there are still a few gas street lamps around, and
apparently some of them are in fair London town, and maybe they're lit
around Christmas time.
Does anyrat know where these lights are, and will they be lit around
Christmas time?
If, come Christmas, we're out from under the Covid thumb, I might go and
look.  And possibly even vice versa.
I can well imagine some "Christmas Fayre" bringing in a couple of Ye
Olde Gas lamps - powered by a propane cylinder hidden in the base of the
lamp.

Nostalgia ain't wot it was.
--
Sam Plusnet
Mike
2020-09-11 07:50:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Peter
I'd ask this in one of the local.london ngs, but they seem to be
defunct.  Apparently there are still a few gas street lamps around, and
apparently some of them are in fair London town, and maybe they're lit
around Christmas time.
Does anyrat know where these lights are, and will they be lit around
Christmas time?
If, come Christmas, we're out from under the Covid thumb, I might go and
look.  And possibly even vice versa.
I can well imagine some "Christmas Fayre" bringing in a couple of Ye
Olde Gas lamps - powered by a propane cylinder hidden in the base of the
lamp.
Nostalgia ain't wot it was.
‘It’s a gas.’
--
Toodle Pip
Rosalind Mitchell
2020-09-13 11:27:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter
I'd ask this in one of the local.london ngs, but they seem to be
defunct.  Apparently there are still a few gas street lamps around, and
apparently some of them are in fair London town, and maybe they're lit
around Christmas time.
Does anyrat know where these lights are, and will they be lit around
Christmas time?
I believe at least some of them are in the Inner and Middle Temple but I
may be baked alaska.

R
Peter
2020-09-13 12:08:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
Post by Peter
I'd ask this in one of the local.london ngs, but they seem to be
defunct.  Apparently there are still a few gas street lamps around,
and apparently some of them are in fair London town, and maybe they're
lit around Christmas time.
Does anyrat know where these lights are, and will they be lit around
Christmas time?
I believe at least some of them are in the Inner and Middle Temple but I
may be baked alaska.
I'll go and look just as soon as it's safe to come out from under the duvet.
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
R
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