Discussion:
CV-19
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BrritSki
2020-04-18 12:23:46 UTC
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Wow, this is really interesting...


J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-04-18 18:26:38 UTC
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Post by BrritSki
Wow, this is really interesting...
http://youtu.be/bfN2JWifLCY
34'53": "Why lockdowns are the wrong policy - Swedish expert Prof. Johan
Giesecke".
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

One of my tricks as an armchair futurist is to "predict" things that are
already happening and watch people tell me it will never happen.
Scott Adams, 2015-3-9
Dumrat
2020-04-19 15:26:55 UTC
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Post by BrritSki
Wow, this is really interesting...
http://youtu.be/bfN2JWifLCY
34'53": "Why lockdowns are the wrong policy - Swedish expert Prof. Johan Giesecke".
Biting them in the back now, though, isn't it - unless you agree with felling your entire
elderly population who are living in care in one fell swoop, that is?

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/apr/19/anger-in-sweden-as-elderly-pay-price-for-coronavirus-strategy
--
Salaam Alaykum,
Anne, Exceptionally Traditionally-built Dumrat
Sam Plusnet
2020-04-19 20:43:00 UTC
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Post by Dumrat
Post by BrritSki
Wow, this is really interesting...
http://youtu.be/bfN2JWifLCY
34'53": "Why lockdowns are the wrong policy - Swedish expert Prof. Johan Giesecke".
Biting them in the back now, though, isn't it - unless you agree with
felling your entire elderly population who are living in care in one
fell swoop, that is?
https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/apr/19/anger-in-sweden-as-elderly-pay-price-for-coronavirus-strategy
Article in the same issue about people who are left off the vulnerable
list being unable to get food.

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2020/apr/19/disabled-people-left-off-coronavirus-vulnerable-list-go-without-food
--
Sam Plusnet
Chris McMillan
2020-04-20 17:26:10 UTC
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Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Dumrat
Post by BrritSki
Wow, this is really interesting...
http://youtu.be/bfN2JWifLCY
34'53": "Why lockdowns are the wrong policy - Swedish expert Prof. Johan Giesecke".
Biting them in the back now, though, isn't it - unless you agree with
felling your entire elderly population who are living in care in one
fell swoop, that is?
https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/apr/19/anger-in-sweden-as-elderly-pay-price-for-coronavirus-strategy
Article in the same issue about people who are left off the vulnerable
list being unable to get food.
https://www.theguardian.com/society/2020/apr/19/disabled-people-left-off-coronavirus-vulnerable-list-go-without-food
The rnib and other VI charities has set up a petition to get us put on the
list. Not holding my breath for the partially sighted/sight impaired.
Those having chemo are listed as vulnerable. I smell lots of rats.

Sincerely Chris
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-04-20 19:45:33 UTC
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On Mon, 20 Apr 2020 at 17:26:10, Chris McMillan
<***@ntlworld.com> wrote:
[]
Post by Chris McMillan
I smell lots of rats.
Sincerely Chris
I don't think that's wise, even when not in CV times. Unless they're pet
rats.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Eve had an Apple, Adam had a Wang...
Chris McMillan
2020-04-23 09:24:32 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
On Mon, 20 Apr 2020 at 17:26:10, Chris McMillan
[]
Post by Chris McMillan
I smell lots of rats.
Sincerely Chris
I don't think that's wise, even when not in CV times. Unless they're pet
rats.
Rotflmao. Don’t even like handling pet rats.
Jenny M Benson
2020-04-24 08:14:42 UTC
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Post by Chris McMillan
Rotflmao. Don’t even like handling pet rats.
I can't abide rats. My son kept asking to have one and I kept refusing.
He got fed up and went and bought one on his own anyway. It was a
white one with a ghastly pink tail.

Then my son went away to school and I had to look after the rat. I fed
it, watered it and kept it clean, but left the cage in his bedroom and
couldn't bring myself to interact it with it otherwise. After a few
weeks the poor thing died, probably of loneliness and boredom, and I
still feel guilty.
--
Jenny M Benson
Wrexham, UK
Min
2020-04-24 22:45:50 UTC
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Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Chris McMillan
Rotflmao. Don’t even like handling pet rats.
I can't abide rats. My son kept asking to have one and I kept refusing.
He got fed up and went and bought one on his own anyway. It was a
white one with a ghastly pink tail.
Then my son went away to school and I had to look after the rat. I fed
it, watered it and kept it clean, but left the cage in his bedroom and
couldn't bring myself to interact it with it otherwise. After a few
weeks the poor thing died, probably of loneliness and boredom, and I
still feel guilty.
It probably did. One should never just have one rat - they are very
sociable animals. A single female would probably fare better than a
single male. The late Alex had rats and I found them okay, but never
wanted one myself. Anyway, it probably would have died without another
rat to keep it company. Not your fault.
--
Min
Chris McMillan
2020-04-25 14:51:48 UTC
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Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Chris McMillan
Rotflmao. Don’t even like handling pet rats.
I can't abide rats. My son kept asking to have one and I kept refusing.
He got fed up and went and bought one on his own anyway. It was a
white one with a ghastly pink tail.
Then my son went away to school and I had to look after the rat. I fed
it, watered it and kept it clean, but left the cage in his bedroom and
couldn't bring myself to interact it with it otherwise. After a few
weeks the poor thing died, probably of loneliness and boredom, and I
still feel guilty.
A friend of ours has a daughter who had two white pet rats. Hazel fell in
love with them on sight. She’s always had similar furry things in cages. I
can cope with guinea pigs but nothing smaller.

Sincerely Chris
Sam Plusnet
2020-04-25 21:30:04 UTC
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Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Chris McMillan
Rotflmao. Don’t even like handling pet rats.
I can't abide rats. My son kept asking to have one and I kept refusing.
He got fed up and went and bought one on his own anyway. It was a
white one with a ghastly pink tail.
Then my son went away to school and I had to look after the rat. I fed
it, watered it and kept it clean, but left the cage in his bedroom and
couldn't bring myself to interact it with it otherwise. After a few
weeks the poor thing died, probably of loneliness and boredom, and I
still feel guilty.
A friend of ours has a daughter who had two white pet rats. Hazel fell in
love with them on sight. She’s always had similar furry things in cages. I
can cope with guinea pigs but nothing smaller.
<swerve>
We are tonight empty nesters.
The hedgehog we have been hosting since later October has been
removed[1] into the garden where food and drink will continue to be
provided (in a specially modified annex) for the foreseeable.

It was a tiny tiny thing when we took it in (no chance of it surviving)
but now probably qualifies as obese for a hedgehog (How do you calculate
BMI for a hedgehog?).

Wofe is anxious of course.

[1] His Rabbit/Guinea Pig/Ferret Coop/Hutch/Run has been weatherproofed
and relocated.
--
Sam Plusnet
Nick Odell
2020-04-26 02:25:23 UTC
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Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Jenny M Benson
Rotflmao. Don’t even like handling pet rats.
I can't abide rats. My son kept asking to have one and I kept refusing.
He got fed up and went and bought one on his own anyway. It was a
white one with a ghastly pink tail.
Then my son went away to school and I had to look after the rat. I fed
it, watered it and kept it clean, but left the cage in his bedroom and
couldn't bring myself to interact it with it otherwise. After a few
weeks the poor thing died, probably of loneliness and boredom, and I
still feel guilty.
A friend of ours has a daughter who had two white pet rats. Hazel fell in
love with them on sight. She’s always had similar furry things in cages. I
can cope with guinea pigs but nothing smaller.
<swerve>
We are tonight empty nesters.
The hedgehog we have been hosting since later October has been
removed[1] into the garden where food and drink will continue to be
provided (in a specially modified annex) for the foreseeable.
It was a tiny tiny thing when we took it in (no chance of it surviving)
but now probably qualifies as obese for a hedgehog (How do you calculate
BMI for a hedgehog?).
Wofe is anxious of course.
[1] His Rabbit/Guinea Pig/Ferret Coop/Hutch/Run has been weatherproofed
and relocated.
Good for you Mr & Mrs P. You are doing a great thing for hedgerowkind.

As a matter of interest, do you think it will thrive better by being
given the run of the garden or being given the garden as a place to
run back to? Bear in mind that if he/she/it thrives a bigger hole in
the garden fence will be needed for the autumn return than the spring
exit.

My sister was not trying to cultivate pademelons in her kitchen garden
in Tas, more trying to cultivate carrots and cabbages and tomatoes
and, well, all sorts of things that pademelons find delicious and she
was not doing all that well because of the pademelons.

So she fenced the kitchen garden in. The wholesale plundering dropped
almost immediately down to a little bit of pilfering on the side. But
how? Who? She had fenced the kitchen garden in.

Then she worked it out. A little pademelon had wriggled in through a
gap in the wire, stuffed itself full of veggies and then found it was
too big to get out again. So it settled down to snooze for the day in
amongst the foundations of the house and came out again, night after
night to gorge on the crops until she worked out what was going on and
"persuaded" it to leave.

No pademelons were hurt in the telling of this tale: they are far too
cute.

Nick
Mike
2020-04-26 07:32:01 UTC
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Post by Nick Odell
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Jenny M Benson
Rotflmao. Don’t even like handling pet rats.
I can't abide rats. My son kept asking to have one and I kept refusing.
He got fed up and went and bought one on his own anyway. It was a
white one with a ghastly pink tail.
Then my son went away to school and I had to look after the rat. I fed
it, watered it and kept it clean, but left the cage in his bedroom and
couldn't bring myself to interact it with it otherwise. After a few
weeks the poor thing died, probably of loneliness and boredom, and I
still feel guilty.
A friend of ours has a daughter who had two white pet rats. Hazel fell in
love with them on sight. She’s always had similar furry things in cages. I
can cope with guinea pigs but nothing smaller.
<swerve>
We are tonight empty nesters.
The hedgehog we have been hosting since later October has been
removed[1] into the garden where food and drink will continue to be
provided (in a specially modified annex) for the foreseeable.
It was a tiny tiny thing when we took it in (no chance of it surviving)
but now probably qualifies as obese for a hedgehog (How do you calculate
BMI for a hedgehog?).
Wofe is anxious of course.
[1] His Rabbit/Guinea Pig/Ferret Coop/Hutch/Run has been weatherproofed
and relocated.
Good for you Mr & Mrs P. You are doing a great thing for hedgerowkind.
As a matter of interest, do you think it will thrive better by being
given the run of the garden or being given the garden as a place to
run back to? Bear in mind that if he/she/it thrives a bigger hole in
the garden fence will be needed for the autumn return than the spring
exit.
My sister was not trying to cultivate pademelons in her kitchen garden
in Tas, more trying to cultivate carrots and cabbages and tomatoes
and, well, all sorts of things that pademelons find delicious and she
was not doing all that well because of the pademelons.
So she fenced the kitchen garden in. The wholesale plundering dropped
almost immediately down to a little bit of pilfering on the side. But
how? Who? She had fenced the kitchen garden in.
Then she worked it out. A little pademelon had wriggled in through a
gap in the wire, stuffed itself full of veggies and then found it was
too big to get out again. So it settled down to snooze for the day in
amongst the foundations of the house and came out again, night after
night to gorge on the crops until she worked out what was going on and
"persuaded" it to leave.
No pademelons were hurt in the telling of this tale: they are far too
cute.
Nick
A Cataroo?
--
Toodle Pip
Chris McMillan
2020-04-26 09:07:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Jenny M Benson
Rotflmao. Don’t even like handling pet rats.
I can't abide rats. My son kept asking to have one and I kept refusing.
He got fed up and went and bought one on his own anyway. It was a
white one with a ghastly pink tail.
Then my son went away to school and I had to look after the rat. I fed
it, watered it and kept it clean, but left the cage in his bedroom and
couldn't bring myself to interact it with it otherwise. After a few
weeks the poor thing died, probably of loneliness and boredom, and I
still feel guilty.
A friend of ours has a daughter who had two white pet rats. Hazel fell in
love with them on sight. She’s always had similar furry things in cages. I
can cope with guinea pigs but nothing smaller.
<swerve>
We are tonight empty nesters.
The hedgehog we have been hosting since later October has been
removed[1] into the garden where food and drink will continue to be
provided (in a specially modified annex) for the foreseeable.
It was a tiny tiny thing when we took it in (no chance of it surviving)
but now probably qualifies as obese for a hedgehog (How do you calculate
BMI for a hedgehog?).
Wofe is anxious of course.
[1] His Rabbit/Guinea Pig/Ferret Coop/Hutch/Run has been weatherproofed
and relocated.
Good for you Mr & Mrs P. You are doing a great thing for hedgerowkind.
As a matter of interest, do you think it will thrive better by being
given the run of the garden or being given the garden as a place to
run back to? Bear in mind that if he/she/it thrives a bigger hole in
the garden fence will be needed for the autumn return than the spring
exit.
My sister was not trying to cultivate pademelons in her kitchen garden
in Tas, more trying to cultivate carrots and cabbages and tomatoes
and, well, all sorts of things that pademelons find delicious and she
was not doing all that well because of the pademelons.
So she fenced the kitchen garden in. The wholesale plundering dropped
almost immediately down to a little bit of pilfering on the side. But
how? Who? She had fenced the kitchen garden in.
Then she worked it out. A little pademelon had wriggled in through a
gap in the wire, stuffed itself full of veggies and then found it was
too big to get out again. So it settled down to snooze for the day in
amongst the foundations of the house and came out again, night after
night to gorge on the crops until she worked out what was going on and
"persuaded" it to leave.
No pademelons were hurt in the telling of this tale: they are far too
cute.
Nick
Pademelon?

Sincerely Chris
Vicky Ayech
2020-04-26 10:16:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sun, 26 Apr 2020 09:07:46 GMT, Chris McMillan
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Nick Odell
No pademelons were hurt in the telling of this tale: they are far too
cute.
Nick
Pademelon?
Sincerely Chris
https://www.google.com/search?q=pademelon&oq=Pademelon&aqs=chrome.0.0j46j0j46j0l4.4019j0j8&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8

Pademelons are small marsupials of the genus Thylogale. They are
usually found in forests. ... Besides their smaller size, pademelons
can be distinguished from wallabies by their shorter, thicker, and
sparsely haired tails.
Chris McMillan
2020-04-26 16:36:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Sun, 26 Apr 2020 09:07:46 GMT, Chris McMillan
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Nick Odell
No pademelons were hurt in the telling of this tale: they are far too
cute.
Nick
Pademelon?
Sincerely Chris
https://www.google.com/search?q=pademelon&oq=Pademelon&aqs=chrome.0.0j46j0j46j0l4.4019j0j8&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8
Pademelons are small marsupials of the genus Thylogale. They are
usually found in forests. ... Besides their smaller size, pademelons
can be distinguished from wallabies by their shorter, thicker, and
sparsely haired tails.
Thanks Vicky. Don’t remember those from the various Aus tv shows we’ve
watched, though Tas is often ‘forgotten’.

Sincerely Chris
Sam Plusnet
2020-04-26 21:36:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
ood for you Mr & Mrs P. You are doing a great thing for hedgerowkind.
As a matter of interest, do you think it will thrive better by being
given the run of the garden or being given the garden as a place to
run back to? Bear in mind that if he/she/it thrives a bigger hole in
the garden fence will be needed for the autumn return than the spring
exit.
Your vision of a tame, orderly, fenced garden is far from the truth.
It's about 1/3 of an acre - mostly untamed - whilst some surrounding
gardens (& graveyard) are bigger. There are no fences, only
(field-style) hedges and the odd drystone wall, but there's no real
barrier to a hedgehog with a yen to roam.
There are (judging by the droppings) a number of established hedgehogs
in the garden - probably his relatives.

Wofe continues to be anxious since he left the hutch & didn't touch the
nosh provided in his dining annex.
--
Sam Plusnet
BrritSki
2020-04-26 07:23:45 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
It was a tiny tiny thing when we took it in (no chance of it surviving)
but now probably qualifies as obese for a hedgehog (How do you calculate
BMI for a hedgehog?).
Carefully. They can be very prickly about such things.
Mike
2020-04-26 07:34:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by BrritSki
Post by Sam Plusnet
It was a tiny tiny thing when we took it in (no chance of it surviving)
but now probably qualifies as obese for a hedgehog (How do you calculate
BMI for a hedgehog?).
Carefully. They can be very prickly about such things.
I’m sure there is a scale, and every hedgehog will be on that spinal scale
somewhere.
--
Toodle Pip
Chris McMillan
2020-04-26 09:07:45 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Chris McMillan
Rotflmao. Don’t even like handling pet rats.
I can't abide rats. My son kept asking to have one and I kept refusing.
He got fed up and went and bought one on his own anyway. It was a
white one with a ghastly pink tail.
Then my son went away to school and I had to look after the rat. I fed
it, watered it and kept it clean, but left the cage in his bedroom and
couldn't bring myself to interact it with it otherwise. After a few
weeks the poor thing died, probably of loneliness and boredom, and I
still feel guilty.
A friend of ours has a daughter who had two white pet rats. Hazel fell in
love with them on sight. She’s always had similar furry things in cages. I
can cope with guinea pigs but nothing smaller.
<swerve>
We are tonight empty nesters.
The hedgehog we have been hosting since later October has been
removed[1] into the garden where food and drink will continue to be
provided (in a specially modified annex) for the foreseeable.
It was a tiny tiny thing when we took it in (no chance of it surviving)
but now probably qualifies as obese for a hedgehog (How do you calculate
BMI for a hedgehog?).
Wofe is anxious of course.
[1] His Rabbit/Guinea Pig/Ferret Coop/Hutch/Run has been weatherproofed
and relocated.
LOL. Some re-purposing that is

Sincerely Chris
Sam Plusnet
2020-04-26 21:20:51 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Sam Plusnet
[1] His Rabbit/Guinea Pig/Ferret Coop/Hutch/Run has been weatherproofed
and relocated.
LOL. Some re-purposing that is
That's (with only the tiniest deviation) the description offered by the
people who sold it to us. I suppose they want to sell to as wide a
market as possible. Waterproofing was done with fabric from an old tent.
--
Sam Plusnet
BrritSki
2020-04-27 07:41:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Sam Plusnet
[1] His Rabbit/Guinea Pig/Ferret Coop/Hutch/Run has been weatherproofed
and relocated.
LOL.  Some re-purposing that is
That's (with only the tiniest deviation) the description offered by the
people who sold it to us.  I suppose they want to sell to as wide a
market as possible.  Waterproofing was done with fabric from an old tent.
Are there many pig/ferret breeders in your local area ?
Serena Blanchflower
2020-04-20 19:50:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Dumrat
Post by BrritSki
Wow, this is really interesting...
http://youtu.be/bfN2JWifLCY
34'53": "Why lockdowns are the wrong policy - Swedish expert Prof. Johan Giesecke".
Biting them in the back now, though, isn't it - unless you agree with
felling your entire elderly population who are living in care in one
fell swoop, that is?
https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/apr/19/anger-in-sweden-as-elderly-pay-price-for-coronavirus-strategy
Article in the same issue about people who are left off the vulnerable
list being unable to get food.
https://www.theguardian.com/society/2020/apr/19/disabled-people-left-off-coronavirus-vulnerable-list-go-without-food
The rnib and other VI charities has set up a petition to get us put on the
list. Not holding my breath for the partially sighted/sight impaired.
Yes, it's a huge problem. The official government list only includes
people who have been made very vulnerable (or significantly more
vulnerable) by the Covid. It doesn't include any of us, VI, housebound
(or bedbound) or, not doubt, a number of other people who were already
vulnerable for other reasons. The trouble is that supermarkets, and the
like, are treating it as a definitive list of people who need support.
Post by Chris McMillan
Those having chemo are listed as vulnerable. I smell lots of rats.
Not surprising, because chemo generally suppresses your immune system,
which makes you hugely vulnerable to Covid.
--
Happy hibernating and stay well,
best wishes, Serena
A positive attitude may not solve all your problems, but it will annoy
enough people to make it worth the effort. (Herm Albright)
Vicky Ayech
2020-04-20 20:44:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Mon, 20 Apr 2020 20:50:58 +0100, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Dumrat
Post by BrritSki
Wow, this is really interesting...
http://youtu.be/bfN2JWifLCY
34'53": "Why lockdowns are the wrong policy - Swedish expert Prof. Johan Giesecke".
Biting them in the back now, though, isn't it - unless you agree with
felling your entire elderly population who are living in care in one
fell swoop, that is?
https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/apr/19/anger-in-sweden-as-elderly-pay-price-for-coronavirus-strategy
Article in the same issue about people who are left off the vulnerable
list being unable to get food.
https://www.theguardian.com/society/2020/apr/19/disabled-people-left-off-coronavirus-vulnerable-list-go-without-food
The rnib and other VI charities has set up a petition to get us put on the
list. Not holding my breath for the partially sighted/sight impaired.
Yes, it's a huge problem. The official government list only includes
people who have been made very vulnerable (or significantly more
vulnerable) by the Covid. It doesn't include any of us, VI, housebound
(or bedbound) or, not doubt, a number of other people who were already
vulnerable for other reasons. The trouble is that supermarkets, and the
like, are treating it as a definitive list of people who need support.
Post by Chris McMillan
Those having chemo are listed as vulnerable. I smell lots of rats.
Not surprising, because chemo generally suppresses your immune system,
which makes you hugely vulnerable to Covid.
Actually now some posters on gransnet are saying they prefer not to be
on the list in case it has unforseen consequences. Might one get
marked DNR without knowing by the GP or on arrival if going into
hospital for anything. Might it result in a restriction of treatment.
Jenny M Benson
2020-04-20 21:57:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
Actually now some posters on gransnet are saying they prefer not to be
on the list in case it has unforseen consequences. Might one get
marked DNR without knowing by the GP or on arrival if going into
hospital for anything. Might it result in a restriction of treatment.
It's that sort of nonsense which confirms my belief I am better off
shunning social media.
--
Jenny M Benson
Wrexham, UK
Vicky Ayech
2020-04-21 11:02:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Mon, 20 Apr 2020 22:57:17 +0100, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Vicky Ayech
Actually now some posters on gransnet are saying they prefer not to be
on the list in case it has unforseen consequences. Might one get
marked DNR without knowing by the GP or on arrival if going into
hospital for anything. Might it result in a restriction of treatment.
It's that sort of nonsense which confirms my belief I am better off
shunning social media.
https://dpac.uk.net/2020/04/if-your-life-matters-please-email-your-mp/
dpac actually email me and do have a website with information., They
take part in social media too to give information but that doesn't
mean they are not telling the truth. I think there were a couple of
newspaper articles but can't find them.
Kate B
2020-04-21 11:47:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Mon, 20 Apr 2020 20:50:58 +0100, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Dumrat
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by BrritSki
Wow, this is really interesting...
http://youtu.be/bfN2JWifLCY
34'53": "Why lockdowns are the wrong policy - Swedish expert Prof.
Johan Giesecke".
Biting them in the back now, though, isn't it - unless you agree with
felling your entire elderly population who are living in care in one
fell swoop, that is?
https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/apr/19/anger-in-sweden-as-elderly-pay-price-for-coronavirus-strategy
Article in the same issue about people who are left off the vulnerable
list being unable to get food.
https://www.theguardian.com/society/2020/apr/19/disabled-people-left-off-coronavirus-vulnerable-list-go-without-food
The rnib and other VI charities has set up a petition to get us put on the
list. Not holding my breath for the partially sighted/sight impaired.
Yes, it's a huge problem. The official government list only includes
people who have been made very vulnerable (or significantly more
vulnerable) by the Covid. It doesn't include any of us, VI, housebound
(or bedbound) or, not doubt, a number of other people who were already
vulnerable for other reasons. The trouble is that supermarkets, and the
like, are treating it as a definitive list of people who need support.
Post by Chris McMillan
Those having chemo are listed as vulnerable. I smell lots of rats.
Not surprising, because chemo generally suppresses your immune system,
which makes you hugely vulnerable to Covid.
Actually now some posters on gransnet are saying they prefer not to be
on the list in case it has unforseen consequences. Might one get
marked DNR without knowing by the GP or on arrival if going into
hospital for anything. Might it result in a restriction of treatment.
My husband hasn't had a letter, though he's 92 and has severe asthma. He
sees it as a potential sentence of incarceration. Thanks to Serena,
though, we made it onto both Tesco and Sainsbury's lists and hope to
stay there. So far crossing fingers...
--
Kate B
London
BrritSki
2020-04-21 12:44:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Kate B
Post by Vicky Ayech
Actually now some posters on gransnet are saying they prefer not to be
on the list in case it has unforseen consequences. Might one get
marked DNR without knowing by the GP or on arrival if going into
hospital for anything. Might it result in a restriction of treatment.
It's certainly a possibility and needs to be considered.
Post by Kate B
My husband hasn't had a letter, though he's 92 and has severe asthma. He
sees it as a potential sentence of incarceration.
I have had a letter and have been happy to stay at home for the past 4
weeks. We are very lucky though in that we are in reasonable health -
waife especially - and she has started shopping again for the last
couple of weeks, and our son and family are just round the corner and
could shop for us when we were both self-isolating for the 1st 2 weeks.
We also have a very nice south-facing garden so can enjoy this lovely
weather so not going without going out.

I'll be happy to keep this up for a while longer, but 12 months ? I
don't think so. At some point I am going to ask myself whether the
personal risks are worth the costs. Obviously there is a wider social
consideration, and we will also comply with the law, but there will come
a point where I decide that self-exile has become too burdensome...
Penny
2020-04-21 14:12:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Tue, 21 Apr 2020 13:44:42 +0100, BrritSki <***@gmail.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by BrritSki
I have had a letter and have been happy to stay at home for the past 4
weeks. We are very lucky though in that we are in reasonable health -
waife especially - and she has started shopping again for the last
couple of weeks, and our son and family are just round the corner and
could shop for us when we were both self-isolating for the 1st 2 weeks.
We also have a very nice south-facing garden so can enjoy this lovely
weather so not going without going out.
I've not had a letter, just made my own assumptions. I'm not covered by the
English list as I don't think my condition is classed as 'severe'. I
haven't seen a Welsh list.
Post by BrritSki
I'll be happy to keep this up for a while longer, but 12 months ? I
don't think so. At some point I am going to ask myself whether the
personal risks are worth the costs. Obviously there is a wider social
consideration, and we will also comply with the law, but there will come
a point where I decide that self-exile has become too burdensome...
Little has changed for me apart from the pressure (mostly from daughters*)
not to do my own shopping. I'm not enjoying that, I like to see and inspect
the options on any fresh produce, the size of individual fruit or veg in a
bag, the visible fat on meat etc. I've also got quite fussy about bread - I
know what I like, but it would be churlish to complain to local 'personal
shoppers'.

I do have a yen for a trip to the coast or just a drive out with all this
clear sunny weather to see the new lambs bouncing around (does anything
else gambol?).

*I was concerned I might be depriving d#2 of shop delivery slots by her
ordering for me. Once or twice she (who normally has deliveries once or
twice a week) has struggled to get a fortnightly one for herself. She says
booking for me too makes no difference.
When I suggested her husband could pop out for top-up stuff she said he is
not going to any shop. I can see it would be very difficult for her (and
the family) if he got ill but I thought most shops had adopted some pretty
good systems now.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-04-21 14:40:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Tue, 21 Apr 2020 at 15:12:42, Penny <***@labyrinth.freeuk.com>
wrote:
[]
Post by Penny
*I was concerned I might be depriving d#2 of shop delivery slots by her
ordering for me. Once or twice she (who normally has deliveries once or
twice a week) has struggled to get a fortnightly one for herself. She says
booking for me too makes no difference.
[]
I would imagine it makes no difference if you're in different areas,
certainly. If in the same one, I'd have to yield to her knowledge.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

"Mary Poppins is a junkie" - bumper sticker on Julie Andrews' car in the '60s
Chris McMillan
2020-04-23 09:58:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Penny
*I was concerned I might be depriving d#2 of shop delivery slots by her
ordering for me. Once or twice she (who normally has deliveries once or
twice a week) has struggled to get a fortnightly one for herself. She says
booking for me too makes no difference.
[]
I would imagine it makes no difference if you're in different areas,
certainly. If in the same one, I'd have to yield to her knowledge.
Wales, Scotland and NI are doing their own thing under devolved guvmint.
Only with every programme being wall to wall I can’t recall uf it was
Womans Hr, Y & Y or WATO.

Sincerely Chris
Penny
2020-04-23 10:36:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 23 Apr 2020 09:58:42 GMT, Chris McMillan
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Penny
*I was concerned I might be depriving d#2 of shop delivery slots by her
ordering for me. Once or twice she (who normally has deliveries once or
twice a week) has struggled to get a fortnightly one for herself. She says
booking for me too makes no difference.
[]
I would imagine it makes no difference if you're in different areas,
certainly. If in the same one, I'd have to yield to her knowledge.
Wales, Scotland and NI are doing their own thing under devolved guvmint.
Only with every programme being wall to wall I can’t recall uf it was
Womans Hr, Y & Y or WATO.
Not sure what that has to do with online grocery shopping but...

My previous delivery was by a driver who likes to moan about the narrowness
of my road. Today I had a somewhat clueless young woman who struggled to
find my house. D#2 phoned to tell me to go and look for her as she was
lost. I found her and gave directions to the right place, as she was
blocking the road.

I went to the right place, parallel with the road she'd been on, no sign.
I wandered to the end of the road, no sign.
I waited for her to reappear assuming she had misunderstood my directions,
she had and I waved her past me into the correct road. She had my house
name and the clue of a red car in the car port. From the speed she sailed
past she wasn't actually looking for either.

Eventually she spotted me waving her back and reversed half way before
stopping again. I pointed at the car in the car port and she said. "Oh" and
backed up some more.

After a while of rummaging in her van she plonked three bags on my doorstep
and went back for the rest. One of the bags was a multipack of quavers,
another contained a bottle of wine and one of squash - none of which I had
ordered.

Eventually she found all my shopping - no substitutions - hurrah!

Next time I think I'll hang shopping bags along my hedge.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Jenny M Benson
2020-04-24 08:25:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
My previous delivery was by a driver who likes to moan about the narrowness
of my road. Today I had a somewhat clueless young woman who struggled to
find my house. D#2 phoned to tell me to go and look for her as she was
lost. I found her and gave directions to the right place, as she was
blocking the road.
I used to have a lot of trouble with people not finding this place,
though it has got better. The thing is, there are 2 blocks of flats, at
right angles to each other with comprise the address and the larger
block fronts the main road and has access from there, while my block has
to be approached by turning off the road and then turning again. Maybe
it's cured now, but part of the problem was that sat navs directed
drivers to another block with a slightly similar name which is only a
few yards from here as the crow flies, but is up a completely different
turn off the main road and about 5 minutes' walk away.
--
Jenny M Benson
Wrexham, UK
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-04-24 13:27:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Penny
My previous delivery was by a driver who likes to moan about the narrowness
of my road. Today I had a somewhat clueless young woman who struggled to
find my house. D#2 phoned to tell me to go and look for her as she was
lost. I found her and gave directions to the right place, as she was
blocking the road.
I used to have a lot of trouble with people not finding this place,
though it has got better. The thing is, there are 2 blocks of flats,
at right angles to each other with comprise the address and the larger
block fronts the main road and has access from there, while my block
has to be approached by turning off the road and then turning again.
Maybe it's cured now, but part of the problem was that sat navs
directed drivers to another block with a slightly similar name which is
only a few yards from here as the crow flies, but is up a completely
different turn off the main road and about 5 minutes' walk away.
Perhaps some (directing) signs? Difficult, as (a) there will always be
one or two people not willing to pay their share [sometimes for
understandable reasons, such as they're in straitened circumstances],
and (b) various authorities have to be persuaded to allow it/them, and
it only takes one jobsworth - or, person who genuinely doesn't feel
it/they should be allowed-to make things difficult. But maybe worth
looking into.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Imagine a world with no hypothetical situations...
Penny
2020-04-24 17:33:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Fri, 24 Apr 2020 14:27:07 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Penny
My previous delivery was by a driver who likes to moan about the narrowness
of my road. Today I had a somewhat clueless young woman who struggled to
find my house. D#2 phoned to tell me to go and look for her as she was
lost. I found her and gave directions to the right place, as she was
blocking the road.
I used to have a lot of trouble with people not finding this place,
though it has got better. The thing is, there are 2 blocks of flats,
at right angles to each other with comprise the address and the larger
block fronts the main road and has access from there, while my block
has to be approached by turning off the road and then turning again.
Maybe it's cured now, but part of the problem was that sat navs
directed drivers to another block with a slightly similar name which is
only a few yards from here as the crow flies, but is up a completely
different turn off the main road and about 5 minutes' walk away.
Perhaps some (directing) signs?
People don't read.
When I found my dippy delivery woman she had stopped very close to my
garden gate upon which is a sign with the name of the house.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Nick Odell
2020-04-24 23:21:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Fri, 24 Apr 2020 09:25:48 +0100, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Penny
My previous delivery was by a driver who likes to moan about the narrowness
of my road. Today I had a somewhat clueless young woman who struggled to
find my house. D#2 phoned to tell me to go and look for her as she was
lost. I found her and gave directions to the right place, as she was
blocking the road.
I used to have a lot of trouble with people not finding this place,
though it has got better. The thing is, there are 2 blocks of flats, at
right angles to each other with comprise the address and the larger
block fronts the main road and has access from there, while my block has
to be approached by turning off the road and then turning again. Maybe
it's cured now, but part of the problem was that sat navs directed
drivers to another block with a slightly similar name which is only a
few yards from here as the crow flies, but is up a completely different
turn off the main road and about 5 minutes' walk away.
Would it help if you offered a different postcode for the delivery?

When I worked at the music school we had an emergency with a student
and called an ambulance. It took forty-five minutes for the ambulance
to arrive (Cue four Yorkshiremen: Forty-five minutes? We used to dream
of an ambulance arriving in forty-five minutes. Well, it was a long
time ago.)

It transpired that the official school address was a street on which
the school had no entrance whatsoever. Look at a plan of the site and
it is obvious that the school belonged to that street but the actual
gates were elsewhere. Local people and the local postie obviously knew
how to treat this situation but an ambulance driver from elsewhere had
to rely on the sat-nav.

So I had a chat with the people who maintained the database used by
the emergency services and we ammended the postcode information to
indicate the street and part of the street where the school gates were
actually located. Unfortunately or fortunately, depending upon your
point of view, I never had another occasion to call an ambulance from
there.

Nick
Vicky Ayech
2020-04-25 07:46:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Fri, 24 Apr 2020 20:21:34 -0300, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
When I worked at the music school we had an emergency with a student
and called an ambulance. It took forty-five minutes for the ambulance
to arrive (Cue four Yorkshiremen: Forty-five minutes? We used to dream
of an ambulance arriving in forty-five minutes. Well, it was a long
time ago.)
We sometimes watch the programmes following ambulance crews and people
are left waiting for hours sometimes, partly because crews can't
unload patients when they get to A&E and they get stacked up there or
in the corridors because the wards are full. I wonder whether all this
new capacity could have been made available in the last few years when
they were clearly needed and whether the shine, new, under-used
hospitals will remain after the crisis is over, in the distant future.
Penny
2020-04-25 08:45:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sat, 25 Apr 2020 08:46:37 +0100, Vicky Ayech <***@gmail.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Vicky Ayech
We sometimes watch the programmes following ambulance crews and people
are left waiting for hours sometimes, partly because crews can't
unload patients when they get to A&E and they get stacked up there or
in the corridors because the wards are full. I wonder whether all this
new capacity could have been made available in the last few years when
they were clearly needed and whether the shine, new, under-used
hospitals will remain after the crisis is over, in the distant future.
An available hospital bed is not just the physical bed. Wards (or beds) get
closed when there are insufficient staff to serve them, for the safety of
the patients. Bean counters think there is an optimum number of staff which
should not be exceeded. This does not take into account the variations of
the day in real life. Staff off sick, major accidents etc.

The ideal hospital* actually runs on too many staff. There are always jobs
which can be done in quiet times and can be safely ignored for a while when
it gets busy. Without this built-in redundancy comes the stress of double
shifts and unpaid overtime, leading to sickness in the staff making the
whole thing worse. There may be agency staff available but because they are
not part of the regular team and in some cases a totally unknown quantity,
one agency nurse is not equal to one regular nurse.

*Was it 'Yes Minister' which pointed out the lovely new hospital was
working really well when it had no patients?
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Nick Odell
2020-04-25 18:07:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
*Was it 'Yes Minister' which pointed out the lovely new hospital was
working really well when it had no patients?
S2E01 - not that I collected the full set of audio recordings or
anything..

Nick
Peter Percival
2020-04-25 19:38:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Penny
*Was it 'Yes Minister' which pointed out the lovely new hospital was
working really well when it had no patients?
Istr that it had one patient - a nurse who stubbed her toe or something.
Post by Nick Odell
S2E01 - not that I collected the full set of audio recordings or
anything..
Nick
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-04-25 19:08:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Vicky Ayech
We sometimes watch the programmes following ambulance crews and people
are left waiting for hours sometimes, partly because crews can't
unload patients when they get to A&E and they get stacked up there or
in the corridors because the wards are full. I wonder whether all this
new capacity could have been made available in the last few years when
they were clearly needed and whether the shine, new, under-used
hospitals will remain after the crisis is over, in the distant future.
Well, the London (the Excel) and Brum (NEC) ones are in exhibition
centres, which will presumably want their halls back if life returns to
something like normal; I'm not sure where, or in what, the others are,
but at a guess they're in something similar.
Post by Penny
An available hospital bed is not just the physical bed. Wards (or beds) get
closed when there are insufficient staff to serve them, for the safety of
the patients. Bean counters think there is an optimum number of staff which
should not be exceeded. This does not take into account the variations of
the day in real life. Staff off sick, major accidents etc.
The ideal hospital* actually runs on too many staff. There are always jobs
which can be done in quiet times and can be safely ignored for a while when
it gets busy. Without this built-in redundancy comes the stress of double
shifts and unpaid overtime, leading to sickness in the staff making the
whole thing worse. There may be agency staff available but because they are
not part of the regular team and in some cases a totally unknown quantity,
one agency nurse is not equal to one regular nurse.
(And presumably costs more anyway.)
Post by Penny
*Was it 'Yes Minister' which pointed out the lovely new hospital was
working really well when it had no patients?
Nick's answered that.

(I have the full set of DVDs. Which I'll finish watching _some_time;
they are really great. [And the theme tune is of course based on the
Westminster chimes; I was delighted when that was pointed out to me.])
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Her [Valerie Singleton's] main job on /Blue Peter/ was to stop unpredictable
creatres running amok. And that was just John Noakes.
- Alison Pearson, RT 2014/9/6-12
krw
2020-04-27 12:13:13 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
Was it 'Yes Minister' which pointed out the lovely new hospital was
working really well when it had no patients?
It is noticeable that in much of GB that trains are currently running on
time. The absence of passengers is proving most helpful.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
BrritSki
2020-04-23 11:16:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Penny
*I was concerned I might be depriving d#2 of shop delivery slots by her
ordering for me. Once or twice she (who normally has deliveries once or
twice a week) has struggled to get a fortnightly one for herself. She says
booking for me too makes no difference.
[]
I would imagine it makes no difference if you're in different areas,
certainly. If in the same one, I'd have to yield to her knowledge.
Wales, Scotland and NI are doing their own thing under devolved guvmint.
Until there's a problem and then it's the UK Gov'ts fault. Just as the
PPE and Testing failures are all the UK Gov'ts fault, but the successes
in building Nightingale Hospitals and new ventilators are down to the
Army and MercedesF1/Dyson/Ineos etc. respectively.

While I'm ranting, why are there so many different organisations doing
the same thing ? NHS PHE DHSC SAGE HRA and no doubt several others.

And can we please stop hearing about all the companies who have not
heard back about supplying PPE ? The one in today's Times was a compay
offering 2,000/week. The need is 60M/week. You contribution is utterly
meaningless when we need things at scale.
I'm sure the vast majority of the 8K or whatever the latest figure is
companies who are also waiting to hear back are either little old ladies
crotcheting mask tidies, small companies who won;t make any difference
at a national level and a fair proportion of crooks and scammers, not
all based in China and supply crap that doesn;t work.

</rant>
Nick Odell
2020-04-23 16:38:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 23 Apr 2020 12:16:34 +0100, BrritSki
Post by BrritSki
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Penny
*I was concerned I might be depriving d#2 of shop delivery slots by her
ordering for me. Once or twice she (who normally has deliveries once or
twice a week) has struggled to get a fortnightly one for herself. She says
booking for me too makes no difference.
[]
I would imagine it makes no difference if you're in different areas,
certainly. If in the same one, I'd have to yield to her knowledge.
Wales, Scotland and NI are doing their own thing under devolved guvmint.
Until there's a problem and then it's the UK Gov'ts fault. Just as the
PPE and Testing failures are all the UK Gov'ts fault, but the successes
in building Nightingale Hospitals and new ventilators are down to the
Army and MercedesF1/Dyson/Ineos etc. respectively.
While I'm ranting, why are there so many different organisations doing
the same thing ? NHS PHE DHSC SAGE HRA and no doubt several others.
And can we please stop hearing about all the companies who have not
heard back about supplying PPE ? The one in today's Times was a compay
offering 2,000/week. The need is 60M/week. You contribution is utterly
meaningless when we need things at scale.
I'm sure the vast majority of the 8K or whatever the latest figure is
companies who are also waiting to hear back are either little old ladies
crotcheting mask tidies, small companies who won;t make any difference
at a national level and a fair proportion of crooks and scammers, not
all based in China and supply crap that doesn;t work.
</rant>
Your first paragraph is the corollary to the England wins a cricket
match, a great success for England; Wales wins at Rugby, hurrah for
Great Britain, no?

Looking through the telescope backwards and from 8,000 miles away, is
it not that the steady march over years and years towards centralism
by governments of all colours and flavours has had a part to play in
this? We do not want two million face visors in a hangar at Brise
Norton and then have to try to work throught the distribution
problems, we want 50, right now, in The Chestnuts Nursing Home, 200 at
A&E, 6 in the GP Surgery and so on and so on.

My proto-DiL is one of those hand-knitters - or rather, she has turned
her school technology workshops into a production facility and is
manufacturing - yes, just a few hundred a day - face visors which are
being delivered to facilities within just a few miles. Though I hate
to mention <spit>Facebook<spit> it seems it is being used in a very
local way so that clinics, homes, hospitals can say what they need at
once and then get it. And thanks to crowdfunding the products are free
at the point of delivery. (That the NHS is not a charity is another
discussion for another time, I think.)

I know. We are where we are. And where we are is a centralised state
and when stress-tested as it is today, it is not working. But when the
enquiry into all this eventually takes place, I hope the effects of
sucking dry local authorities and the subsequent hollowing out of
roles such as local public health are taken into consideration and
acted upon.

Nick
krw
2020-04-23 13:41:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
We do not want two million face visors in a hangar at Brise
Norton and then have to try to work throught the distribution
problems, we want 50, right now, in The Chestnuts Nursing Home, 200 at
A&E, 6 in the GP Surgery and so on and so on.
Globalisation is such a power for good along with just in time
distribution systems. Discuss.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
BrritSki
2020-04-23 14:05:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by krw
  We do not want two million face visors in a hangar at Brise
Norton and then have to try to work throught the distribution
problems, we want 50, right now, in The Chestnuts Nursing Home, 200 at
A&E, 6 in the GP Surgery and so on and so on.
Globalisation is such a power for good along with just in time
distribution systems.  Discuss.
Heh.
Mike
2020-04-23 14:18:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by krw
Post by Nick Odell
We do not want two million face visors in a hangar at Brise
Norton and then have to try to work throught the distribution
problems, we want 50, right now, in The Chestnuts Nursing Home, 200 at
A&E, 6 in the GP Surgery and so on and so on.
Globalisation is such a power for good along with just in time
distribution systems. Discuss.
Globalisation may well be the opportunity that those corvids were waiting
for; they didn’t need to do so much flying, travellers have done it for
them!
--
Toodle Pip
BrritSki
2020-04-23 14:05:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
On Thu, 23 Apr 2020 12:16:34 +0100, BrritSki
Post by BrritSki
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Penny
*I was concerned I might be depriving d#2 of shop delivery slots by her
ordering for me. Once or twice she (who normally has deliveries once or
twice a week) has struggled to get a fortnightly one for herself. She says
booking for me too makes no difference.
[]
I would imagine it makes no difference if you're in different areas,
certainly. If in the same one, I'd have to yield to her knowledge.
Wales, Scotland and NI are doing their own thing under devolved guvmint.
Until there's a problem and then it's the UK Gov'ts fault. Just as the
PPE and Testing failures are all the UK Gov'ts fault, but the successes
in building Nightingale Hospitals and new ventilators are down to the
Army and MercedesF1/Dyson/Ineos etc. respectively.
While I'm ranting, why are there so many different organisations doing
the same thing ? NHS PHE DHSC SAGE HRA and no doubt several others.
And can we please stop hearing about all the companies who have not
heard back about supplying PPE ? The one in today's Times was a compay
offering 2,000/week. The need is 60M/week. You contribution is utterly
meaningless when we need things at scale.
I'm sure the vast majority of the 8K or whatever the latest figure is
companies who are also waiting to hear back are either little old ladies
crotcheting mask tidies, small companies who won;t make any difference
at a national level and a fair proportion of crooks and scammers, not
all based in China and supply crap that doesn;t work.
</rant>
Your first paragraph is the corollary to the England wins a cricket
match, a great success for England; Wales wins at Rugby, hurrah for
Great Britain, no?
Looking through the telescope backwards and from 8,000 miles away, is
it not that the steady march over years and years towards centralism
by governments of all colours and flavours has had a part to play in
this? We do not want two million face visors in a hangar at Brise
Norton and then have to try to work throught the distribution
problems, we want 50, right now, in The Chestnuts Nursing Home, 200 at
A&E, 6 in the GP Surgery and so on and so on.
My proto-DiL is one of those hand-knitters - or rather, she has turned
her school technology workshops into a production facility and is
manufacturing - yes, just a few hundred a day - face visors which are
being delivered to facilities within just a few miles. Though I hate
to mention <spit>Facebook<spit> it seems it is being used in a very
local way so that clinics, homes, hospitals can say what they need at
once and then get it. And thanks to crowdfunding the products are free
at the point of delivery. (That the NHS is not a charity is another
discussion for another time, I think.)
I know. We are where we are. And where we are is a centralised state
and when stress-tested as it is today, it is not working. But when the
enquiry into all this eventually takes place, I hope the effects of
sucking dry local authorities and the subsequent hollowing out of
roles such as local public health are taken into consideration and
acted upon.
But we've got the worst of all worlds - centralisation with then silos
where they clearly don't work well either individually or together.

And I didn't mean to disparage the people who are helping in a small way
at a local level. I am sure they are genuinely contributing and I
shouldn't have included them in the rant at the ridiculous numbers of
companies being bandied about by the MSM as waiting to hear back about
their "offers".
Penny
2020-04-23 17:19:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 23 Apr 2020 15:05:21 +0100, BrritSki <***@gmail.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by BrritSki
Post by Nick Odell
On Thu, 23 Apr 2020 12:16:34 +0100, BrritSki
Much snippage here and there
Post by BrritSki
Post by Nick Odell
Post by BrritSki
And can we please stop hearing about all the companies who have not
heard back about supplying PPE ? The one in today's Times was a compay
offering 2,000/week. The need is 60M/week. You contribution is utterly
meaningless when we need things at scale.
I'm sure the vast majority of the 8K or whatever the latest figure is
companies who are also waiting to hear back are either little old ladies
crotcheting mask tidies, small companies who won;t make any difference
at a national level
We do not want two million face visors in a hangar at Brise
Norton and then have to try to work throught the distribution
problems, we want 50, right now, in The Chestnuts Nursing Home, 200 at
A&E, 6 in the GP Surgery and so on and so on.
My proto-DiL is one of those hand-knitters - or rather, she has turned
her school technology workshops into a production facility and is
manufacturing - yes, just a few hundred a day - face visors which are
being delivered to facilities within just a few miles. Though I hate
to mention <spit>Facebook<spit> it seems it is being used in a very
local way so that clinics, homes, hospitals can say what they need at
once and then get it. And thanks to crowdfunding the products are free
at the point of delivery. (That the NHS is not a charity is another
discussion for another time, I think.)
But we've got the worst of all worlds - centralisation with then silos
where they clearly don't work well either individually or together.
and testing hubs people can't get to.
Post by BrritSki
And I didn't mean to disparage the people who are helping in a small way
at a local level. I am sure they are genuinely contributing and I
shouldn't have included them in the rant at the ridiculous numbers of
companies being bandied about by the MSM as waiting to hear back about
their "offers".
Good, because I was going to pile in with a 'Many a mickle...' rant
involving all those piddling little boats who obviously weren't what was
required to rescue the armed forces from Dunkirk but many are only alive
today because they went anyway.

People want to help in whatever way they can and, from what I've been
hearing, the .gov website could easily be providing more information such
as specs and patterns for protective clothing so they can get on and do so.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Chris McMillan
2020-04-26 08:52:47 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by BrritSki
Post by Nick Odell
On Thu, 23 Apr 2020 12:16:34 +0100, BrritSki
Much snippage here and there
Post by BrritSki
Post by Nick Odell
Post by BrritSki
And can we please stop hearing about all the companies who have not
heard back about supplying PPE ? The one in today's Times was a compay
offering 2,000/week. The need is 60M/week. You contribution is utterly
meaningless when we need things at scale.
I'm sure the vast majority of the 8K or whatever the latest figure is
companies who are also waiting to hear back are either little old ladies
crotcheting mask tidies, small companies who won;t make any difference
at a national level
We do not want two million face visors in a hangar at Brise
Norton and then have to try to work throught the distribution
problems, we want 50, right now, in The Chestnuts Nursing Home, 200 at
A&E, 6 in the GP Surgery and so on and so on.
My proto-DiL is one of those hand-knitters - or rather, she has turned
her school technology workshops into a production facility and is
manufacturing - yes, just a few hundred a day - face visors which are
being delivered to facilities within just a few miles. Though I hate
to mention <spit>Facebook<spit> it seems it is being used in a very
local way so that clinics, homes, hospitals can say what they need at
once and then get it. And thanks to crowdfunding the products are free
at the point of delivery. (That the NHS is not a charity is another
discussion for another time, I think.)
But we've got the worst of all worlds - centralisation with then silos
where they clearly don't work well either individually or together.
and testing hubs people can't get to.
Post by BrritSki
And I didn't mean to disparage the people who are helping in a small way
at a local level. I am sure they are genuinely contributing and I
shouldn't have included them in the rant at the ridiculous numbers of
companies being bandied about by the MSM as waiting to hear back about
their "offers".
Good, because I was going to pile in with a 'Many a mickle...' rant
involving all those piddling little boats who obviously weren't what was
required to rescue the armed forces from Dunkirk but many are only alive
today because they went anyway.
People want to help in whatever way they can and, from what I've been
hearing, the .gov website could easily be providing more information such
as specs and patterns for protective clothing so they can get on and do so.
Somewhere yesterday there was an item from a team who’d been the costume
makers for tv dramas. Having finished working on whatever it was they’d
remained friends and via Zoom, they’ve pooled their skills and produced a
pattern for scrubs as well as locating material.

Sincerely Chris
Sam Plusnet
2020-04-23 22:18:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
We do not want two million face visors in a hangar at Brise
Norton and then have to try to work throught the distribution
problems, we want 50, right now, in The Chestnuts Nursing Home, 200 at
A&E, 6 in the GP Surgery and so on and so on.
Earlier, the BBC was reporting that, of the 400,000 surgical gowns they
were expecting to collect from Turkey, only 32,000 were actually supplied.

That has now shifted to "It is not clear exactly what supplies the
flight contained and no clear reason was given for the delay."
--
Sam Plusnet
Chris McMillan
2020-04-26 08:52:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
On Thu, 23 Apr 2020 12:16:34 +0100, BrritSki
Post by BrritSki
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Penny
*I was concerned I might be depriving d#2 of shop delivery slots by her
ordering for me. Once or twice she (who normally has deliveries once or
twice a week) has struggled to get a fortnightly one for herself. She says
booking for me too makes no difference.
[]
I would imagine it makes no difference if you're in different areas,
certainly. If in the same one, I'd have to yield to her knowledge.
Wales, Scotland and NI are doing their own thing under devolved guvmint.
Until there's a problem and then it's the UK Gov'ts fault. Just as the
PPE and Testing failures are all the UK Gov'ts fault, but the successes
in building Nightingale Hospitals and new ventilators are down to the
Army and MercedesF1/Dyson/Ineos etc. respectively.
While I'm ranting, why are there so many different organisations doing
the same thing ? NHS PHE DHSC SAGE HRA and no doubt several others.
And can we please stop hearing about all the companies who have not
heard back about supplying PPE ? The one in today's Times was a compay
offering 2,000/week. The need is 60M/week. You contribution is utterly
meaningless when we need things at scale.
I'm sure the vast majority of the 8K or whatever the latest figure is
companies who are also waiting to hear back are either little old ladies
crotcheting mask tidies, small companies who won;t make any difference
at a national level and a fair proportion of crooks and scammers, not
all based in China and supply crap that doesn;t work.
</rant>
Your first paragraph is the corollary to the England wins a cricket
match, a great success for England; Wales wins at Rugby, hurrah for
Great Britain, no?
Looking through the telescope backwards and from 8,000 miles away, is
it not that the steady march over years and years towards centralism
by governments of all colours and flavours has had a part to play in
this? We do not want two million face visors in a hangar at Brise
Norton and then have to try to work throught the distribution
problems, we want 50, right now, in The Chestnuts Nursing Home, 200 at
A&E, 6 in the GP Surgery and so on and so on.
My proto-DiL is one of those hand-knitters - or rather, she has turned
her school technology workshops into a production facility and is
manufacturing - yes, just a few hundred a day - face visors which are
being delivered to facilities within just a few miles. Though I hate
to mention <spit>Facebook<spit> it seems it is being used in a very
local way so that clinics, homes, hospitals can say what they need at
once and then get it. And thanks to crowdfunding the products are free
at the point of delivery. (That the NHS is not a charity is another
discussion for another time, I think.)
I know. We are where we are. And where we are is a centralised state
and when stress-tested as it is today, it is not working. But when the
enquiry into all this eventually takes place, I hope the effects of
sucking dry local authorities and the subsequent hollowing out of
roles such as local public health are taken into consideration and
acted upon.
Nick
Your proto dil is the Leighton Park Skule (Quaker set up centuries ago) who
use their 3D printer and other schools and businesses who have pitched in
with the other equipment and skills and they listed the GP surgeries which
included ours being close by.

Sincerely Chris
Nick Odell
2020-04-26 22:58:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sun, 26 Apr 2020 08:52:46 GMT, Chris McMillan
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Nick Odell
On Thu, 23 Apr 2020 12:16:34 +0100, BrritSki
Post by BrritSki
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Penny
*I was concerned I might be depriving d#2 of shop delivery slots by her
ordering for me. Once or twice she (who normally has deliveries once or
twice a week) has struggled to get a fortnightly one for herself. She says
booking for me too makes no difference.
[]
I would imagine it makes no difference if you're in different areas,
certainly. If in the same one, I'd have to yield to her knowledge.
Wales, Scotland and NI are doing their own thing under devolved guvmint.
Until there's a problem and then it's the UK Gov'ts fault. Just as the
PPE and Testing failures are all the UK Gov'ts fault, but the successes
in building Nightingale Hospitals and new ventilators are down to the
Army and MercedesF1/Dyson/Ineos etc. respectively.
While I'm ranting, why are there so many different organisations doing
the same thing ? NHS PHE DHSC SAGE HRA and no doubt several others.
And can we please stop hearing about all the companies who have not
heard back about supplying PPE ? The one in today's Times was a compay
offering 2,000/week. The need is 60M/week. You contribution is utterly
meaningless when we need things at scale.
I'm sure the vast majority of the 8K or whatever the latest figure is
companies who are also waiting to hear back are either little old ladies
crotcheting mask tidies, small companies who won;t make any difference
at a national level and a fair proportion of crooks and scammers, not
all based in China and supply crap that doesn;t work.
</rant>
Your first paragraph is the corollary to the England wins a cricket
match, a great success for England; Wales wins at Rugby, hurrah for
Great Britain, no?
Looking through the telescope backwards and from 8,000 miles away, is
it not that the steady march over years and years towards centralism
by governments of all colours and flavours has had a part to play in
this? We do not want two million face visors in a hangar at Brise
Norton and then have to try to work throught the distribution
problems, we want 50, right now, in The Chestnuts Nursing Home, 200 at
A&E, 6 in the GP Surgery and so on and so on.
My proto-DiL is one of those hand-knitters - or rather, she has turned
her school technology workshops into a production facility and is
manufacturing - yes, just a few hundred a day - face visors which are
being delivered to facilities within just a few miles. Though I hate
to mention <spit>Facebook<spit> it seems it is being used in a very
local way so that clinics, homes, hospitals can say what they need at
once and then get it. And thanks to crowdfunding the products are free
at the point of delivery. (That the NHS is not a charity is another
discussion for another time, I think.)
I know. We are where we are. And where we are is a centralised state
and when stress-tested as it is today, it is not working. But when the
enquiry into all this eventually takes place, I hope the effects of
sucking dry local authorities and the subsequent hollowing out of
roles such as local public health are taken into consideration and
acted upon.
Nick
Your proto dil is the Leighton Park Skule (Quaker set up centuries ago) who
use their 3D printer and other schools and businesses who have pitched in
with the other equipment and skills and they listed the GP surgeries which
included ours being close by.
Not guilty, yeronnor! It seems lots and lots of school teachers all
over the UK are taking advantage of the empty workshops in their
schools and producing material for health care etc. This school is
near Manchester.

Nick
Nick Odell
2020-04-23 16:39:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 23 Apr 2020 09:58:42 GMT, Chris McMillan
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Penny
*I was concerned I might be depriving d#2 of shop delivery slots by her
ordering for me. Once or twice she (who normally has deliveries once or
twice a week) has struggled to get a fortnightly one for herself. She says
booking for me too makes no difference.
[]
I would imagine it makes no difference if you're in different areas,
certainly. If in the same one, I'd have to yield to her knowledge.
Wales, Scotland and NI are doing their own thing under devolved guvmint.
Only with every programme being wall to wall I can’t recall uf it was
Womans Hr, Y & Y or WATO.
Bring back signature tunes, I say!

Nick
Joe Kerr
2020-04-21 14:51:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
I do have a yen for a trip to the coast or just a drive out with all this
clear sunny weather to see the new lambs bouncing around (does anything
else gambol?).
It's hard to tell. They're all members of gambolers anonymous.
--
Ric
Mike
2020-04-21 15:28:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Joe Kerr
Post by Penny
I do have a yen for a trip to the coast or just a drive out with all this
clear sunny weather to see the new lambs bouncing around (does anything
else gambol?).
It's hard to tell. They're all members of gambolers anonymous.
That’s a rather sheepish remark!
--
Toodle Pip
John Ashby
2020-04-21 17:04:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by Joe Kerr
Post by Penny
I do have a yen for a trip to the coast or just a drive out with all this
clear sunny weather to see the new lambs bouncing around (does anything
else gambol?).
It's hard to tell. They're all members of gambolers anonymous.
That’s a rather sheepish remark!
Ewe had to ram it home, wether it needed or not. Shear impudence.

john
steve hague
2020-04-21 17:13:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by John Ashby
Post by Mike
Post by Joe Kerr
Post by Penny
I do have a yen for a trip to the coast or just a drive out with all this
clear sunny weather to see the new lambs bouncing around (does anything
else gambol?).
It's hard to tell. They're all members of gambolers anonymous.
That’s a rather sheepish remark!
Ewe had to ram it home, wether it needed or not. Shear impudence.
john
Comes as result of wooly thinking in my opinion.
Penny
2020-04-21 17:08:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Tue, 21 Apr 2020 15:28:17 GMT, Mike <***@ntlworld.com> scrawled
in the dust...
Post by Mike
Post by Joe Kerr
Post by Penny
I do have a yen for a trip to the coast or just a drive out with all this
clear sunny weather to see the new lambs bouncing around (does anything
else gambol?).
It's hard to tell. They're all members of gambolers anonymous.
:))
Post by Mike
That’s a rather sheepish remark!
Of course I can still enjoy photos of them, I've taken in previous years.
Here's one (three if you include the linked) I'm fond of
<https://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/5965467>
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Chris McMillan
2020-04-23 09:45:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
in the dust...
Post by Mike
Post by Joe Kerr
Post by Penny
I do have a yen for a trip to the coast or just a drive out with all this
clear sunny weather to see the new lambs bouncing around (does anything
else gambol?).
It's hard to tell. They're all members of gambolers anonymous.
:))
Post by Mike
That’s a rather sheepish remark!
Of course I can still enjoy photos of them, I've taken in previous years.
Here's one (three if you include the linked) I'm fond of
<https://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/5965467>
Respect!!

Sincerely Chris
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-04-24 02:46:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 23 Apr 2020 at 09:45:31, Chris McMillan
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Penny
in the dust...
[]
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Penny
Post by Mike
That’s a rather sheepish remark!
Of course I can still enjoy photos of them, I've taken in previous years.
Here's one (three if you include the linked) I'm fond of
<https://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/5965467>
Respect!!
Sincerely Chris
Good pictures, but I was a bit concerned about the red on the back of
the ewe; it looked like a rather painful injury. Was it in fact just
raddle or something similar?
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

A waist is a terrible thing to mind.
Penny
2020-04-24 08:02:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Fri, 24 Apr 2020 03:46:11 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
On Thu, 23 Apr 2020 at 09:45:31, Chris McMillan
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Penny
in the dust...
[]
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Penny
Post by Mike
That’s a rather sheepish remark!
Of course I can still enjoy photos of them, I've taken in previous years.
Here's one (three if you include the linked) I'm fond of
<https://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/5965467>
Respect!!
Sincerely Chris
Good pictures, but I was a bit concerned about the red on the back of
the ewe; it looked like a rather painful injury. Was it in fact just
raddle or something similar?
I think it is some sort of identifying mark and will match those on her
lambs but it may well be raddle and some has rubbed off onto the lamb. Some
flocks have very clear numbers painted on so the lambs can be matched with
their mother, <https://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/3288190>.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Sam Plusnet
2020-04-21 20:33:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Joe Kerr
Post by Penny
I do have a yen for a trip to the coast or just a drive out with all this
clear sunny weather to see the new lambs bouncing around (does anything
else gambol?).
It's hard to tell. They're all members of gambolers anonymous.
True.
What happens in Vagas, stays in Vagas.
--
Sam Plusnet
Mike
2020-04-22 07:24:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Joe Kerr
Post by Penny
I do have a yen for a trip to the coast or just a drive out with all this
clear sunny weather to see the new lambs bouncing around (does anything
else gambol?).
It's hard to tell. They're all members of gambolers anonymous.
True.
What happens in Vagas, stays in Vagas.
But when the chips are down...
--
Toodle Pip
BrritSki
2020-04-22 08:21:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Joe Kerr
Post by Penny
I do have a yen for a trip to the coast or just a drive out with all this
clear sunny weather to see the new lambs bouncing around (does anything
else gambol?).
It's hard to tell. They're all members of gambolers anonymous.
True.
What happens in Vagas, stays in Vagas.
Waves from the Algarve...
Penny
2020-04-22 10:26:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 22 Apr 2020 09:21:59 +0100, BrritSki <***@gmail.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by BrritSki
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Joe Kerr
Post by Penny
I do have a yen for a trip to the coast or just a drive out with all this
clear sunny weather to see the new lambs bouncing around (does anything
else gambol?).
It's hard to tell. They're all members of gambolers anonymous.
True.
What happens in Vagas, stays in Vagas.
Waves from the Algarve...
Is there a storm brewing, a tsunami (and what are you doing down there)?
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
BrritSki
2020-04-22 11:12:02 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by BrritSki
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Joe Kerr
Post by Penny
I do have a yen for a trip to the coast or just a drive out with all this
clear sunny weather to see the new lambs bouncing around (does anything
else gambol?).
It's hard to tell. They're all members of gambolers anonymous.
True.
What happens in Vagas, stays in Vagas.
Waves from the Algarve...
Is there a storm brewing, a tsunami (and what are you doing down there)?
Something I saw suggested that vagas was waves in Portugese, but it
seems I was wrong...
Penny
2020-04-22 14:15:44 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 22 Apr 2020 12:12:02 +0100, BrritSki <***@gmail.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by BrritSki
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by BrritSki
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Joe Kerr
Post by Penny
I do have a yen for a trip to the coast or just a drive out with all this
clear sunny weather to see the new lambs bouncing around (does anything
else gambol?).
It's hard to tell. They're all members of gambolers anonymous.
True.
What happens in Vagas, stays in Vagas.
Waves from the Algarve...
Is there a storm brewing, a tsunami (and what are you doing down there)?
Something I saw suggested that vagas was waves in Portugese, but it
seems I was wrong...
Oh, I sort of expected a sexual swerve from you then assumed it was a place
name but didn't check.
Vagas is vacancy in Portuguese, wave would be acenar for the verb and ondas
for the sea, I think.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
BrritSki
2020-04-22 14:40:38 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by BrritSki
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by BrritSki
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Joe Kerr
Post by Penny
I do have a yen for a trip to the coast or just a drive out with all this
clear sunny weather to see the new lambs bouncing around (does anything
else gambol?).
It's hard to tell. They're all members of gambolers anonymous.
True.
What happens in Vagas, stays in Vagas.
Waves from the Algarve...
Is there a storm brewing, a tsunami (and what are you doing down there)?
Something I saw suggested that vagas was waves in Portugese, but it
seems I was wrong...
Oh, I sort of expected a sexual swerve from you...
What a nerve ;)
Sam Plusnet
2020-04-22 21:18:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by BrritSki
Post by Penny
On Wed, 22 Apr 2020 09:21:59 +0100, BrritSki
scrawled in the dust...
Post by BrritSki
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Joe Kerr
Post by Penny
I do have a yen for a trip to the coast or just a drive out with
all
this
clear sunny weather to see the new lambs bouncing around (does anything
else gambol?).
It's hard to tell. They're all members of gambolers anonymous.
True.
What happens in Vagas, stays in Vagas.
Waves from the Algarve...
Is there a storm brewing, a tsunami (and what are you doing down there)?
Something I saw suggested that vagas was waves in Portugese, but it
seems I was wrong...
Oh, I sort of expected a sexual swerve from you...
What a nerve  ;)
That's Vagus - not Vagas.
--
Sam Plusnet
Chris McMillan
2020-04-25 12:01:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Dumrat
Post by BrritSki
Wow, this is really interesting...
http://youtu.be/bfN2JWifLCY
34'53": "Why lockdowns are the wrong policy - Swedish expert Prof. Johan Giesecke".
Biting them in the back now, though, isn't it - unless you agree with
felling your entire elderly population who are living in care in one
fell swoop, that is?
https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/apr/19/anger-in-sweden-as-elderly-pay-price-for-coronavirus-strategy
Article in the same issue about people who are left off the vulnerable
list being unable to get food.
https://www.theguardian.com/society/2020/apr/19/disabled-people-left-off-coronavirus-vulnerable-list-go-without-food
The rnib and other VI charities has set up a petition to get us put on the
list. Not holding my breath for the partially sighted/sight impaired.
Yes, it's a huge problem. The official government list only includes
people who have been made very vulnerable (or significantly more
vulnerable) by the Covid. It doesn't include any of us, VI, housebound
(or bedbound) or, not doubt, a number of other people who were already
vulnerable for other reasons. The trouble is that supermarkets, and the
like, are treating it as a definitive list of people who need support.
Post by Chris McMillan
Those having chemo are listed as vulnerable. I smell lots of rats.
Not surprising, because chemo generally suppresses your immune system,
which makes you hugely vulnerable to Covid.
Which suggests somewhere officials aren’t reading carefully. They see the
disabling condition and don’t take in the rest of the list. How else the
the bleeding obvious be ignored? My cousin tells me that her crohns
disease husband has their local shop going the extra mike daily, the
supermarket deliveries works where they are, and they were most surprised
to get a guvmint food box. Even health people check in. Which is a relief
except that crohns people live on a so called ‘unhealthy’ diet for obvious
reasons!
krw
2020-04-27 12:15:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chris McMillan
Even health people check in. Which is a relief
except that crohns people live on a so called ‘unhealthy’ diet for obvious
reasons!
The football club for which I hold a season ticket phoned up to check I
was OK. Can't see how they could actually help but thee may be others
who were able to benefit.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-04-27 15:37:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by krw
Post by Chris McMillan
Even health people check in. Which is a relief
except that crohns people live on a so called ‘unhealthy’ diet for obvious
reasons!
The football club for which I hold a season ticket phoned up to check I
was OK. Can't see how they could actually help but thee may be others
who were able to benefit.
Well, its good PR for them, but more genuinely, they may have people -
either their own staff, or (probably young) fans - who could help you
out, with things like shopping, if you _weren't_ all right.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

And indeed, Dutch isn't a lanuguage, it's a throat disease.
- Frank Slootweg in 3 Windows newsgroups, 2019-7-24
Chris McMillan
2020-04-20 17:26:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dumrat
Post by BrritSki
Wow, this is really interesting...
http://youtu.be/bfN2JWifLCY
34'53": "Why lockdowns are the wrong policy - Swedish expert Prof. Johan Giesecke".
Biting them in the back now, though, isn't it - unless you agree with felling your entire
elderly population who are living in care in one fell swoop, that is?
https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/apr/19/anger-in-sweden-as-elderly-pay-price-for-coronavirus-strategy
Discovered yesterday that mum’s home has had some deaths and the senior
manager was tested positive on Fri but was able to email me on Saturday.
Mum hasn’t responded to rehydration: nothing to be done now. The dementia
is too far entrenched now. No,one knows how long she can live.

It’s what it is.

Best Chris
Dumrat
2020-04-20 18:05:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Dumrat
Post by BrritSki
Wow, this is really interesting...
http://youtu.be/bfN2JWifLCY
34'53": "Why lockdowns are the wrong policy - Swedish expert Prof. Johan Giesecke".
Biting them in the back now, though, isn't it - unless you agree with felling your entire
elderly population who are living in care in one fell swoop, that is?
https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/apr/19/anger-in-sweden-as-elderly-pay-price-for-coronavirus-strategy
Discovered yesterday that mum’s home has had some deaths and the senior
manager was tested positive on Fri but was able to email me on Saturday.
Mum hasn’t responded to rehydration: nothing to be done now. The dementia
is too far entrenched now. No,one knows how long she can live.
It’s what it is.
Best Chris
Oh, Chris. I'm so sorry.
--
Salaam Alaykum,
Anne, Exceptionally Traditionally-built Dumrat
Nick Odell
2020-04-20 21:23:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Mon, 20 Apr 2020 17:26:10 GMT, Chris McMillan
Post by Dumrat
Post by BrritSki
Wow, this is really interesting...
http://youtu.be/bfN2JWifLCY
34'53": "Why lockdowns are the wrong policy - Swedish expert Prof. Johan Giesecke".
Biting them in the back now, though, isn't it - unless you agree with felling your entire
elderly population who are living in care in one fell swoop, that is?
https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/apr/19/anger-in-sweden-as-elderly-pay-price-for-coronavirus-strategy
Discovered yesterday that mum’s home has had some deaths and the senior
manager was tested positive on Fri but was able to email me on Saturday.
Mum hasn’t responded to rehydration: nothing to be done now. The dementia
is too far entrenched now. No,one knows how long she can live.
It’s what it is.
Very sorry to hear this, Chris.

Our thoughts and prayers are with you all.

N&L
Sid Nuncius
2020-04-20 18:52:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
On Mon, 20 Apr 2020 17:26:10 GMT, Chris McMillan
Post by Chris McMillan
Discovered yesterday that mum’s home has had some deaths and the senior
manager was tested positive on Fri but was able to email me on Saturday.
Mum hasn’t responded to rehydration: nothing to be done now. The dementia
is too far entrenched now. No,one knows how long she can live.
It’s what it is.
Very sorry to hear this, Chris.
Our thoughts and prayers are with you all.
Indeed they are.

I hope the burden of the coming days is not too heavy, Chris. I send
you my love.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Vicky Ayech
2020-04-20 20:41:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Mon, 20 Apr 2020 19:52:27 +0100, Sid Nuncius
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Nick Odell
On Mon, 20 Apr 2020 17:26:10 GMT, Chris McMillan
Discovered yesterday that mum’s home has had some deaths and the senior
manager was tested positive on Fri but was able to email me on Saturday.
Mum hasn’t responded to rehydration: nothing to be done now. The dementia
is too far entrenched now. No,one knows how long she can live.
It’s what it is.
Very sorry to hear this, Chris.
Our thoughts and prayers are with you all.
Indeed they are.
I hope the burden of the coming days is not too heavy, Chris. I send
you my love.
Take it easy, Chris. Even when you know it is coming and that your
parent no longer is really there it is a big thing when it happens.
All the best.
Chris McMillan
2020-04-23 07:05:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Nick Odell
On Mon, 20 Apr 2020 17:26:10 GMT, Chris McMillan
Post by Chris McMillan
Discovered yesterday that mum’s home has had some deaths and the senior
manager was tested positive on Fri but was able to email me on Saturday.
Mum hasn’t responded to rehydration: nothing to be done now. The dementia
is too far entrenched now. No,one knows how long she can live.
It’s what it is.
Very sorry to hear this, Chris.
Our thoughts and prayers are with you all.
Indeed they are.
I hope the burden of the coming days is not too heavy, Chris. I send
you my love.
Can’t do anything, ringing up takes attention off their tasks. It’s what
it is. The system is another matter. It’s made me physically ill far more
than the cause. Sod’s law and Covid is going to be the law of unintended
consequences magnified.

Sincerely Chris

Sincerely Chris
krw
2020-04-20 22:36:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
On Mon, 20 Apr 2020 17:26:10 GMT, Chris McMillan
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Dumrat
Post by BrritSki
Wow, this is really interesting...
http://youtu.be/bfN2JWifLCY
34'53": "Why lockdowns are the wrong policy - Swedish expert Prof. Johan Giesecke".
Biting them in the back now, though, isn't it - unless you agree with felling your entire
elderly population who are living in care in one fell swoop, that is?
https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/apr/19/anger-in-sweden-as-elderly-pay-price-for-coronavirus-strategy
Discovered yesterday that mum’s home has had some deaths and the senior
manager was tested positive on Fri but was able to email me on Saturday.
Mum hasn’t responded to rehydration: nothing to be done now. The dementia
is too far entrenched now. No,one knows how long she can live.
It’s what it is.
Very sorry to hear this, Chris.
Our thoughts and prayers are with you all.
And from here.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Min
2020-04-20 23:35:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by krw
Post by Nick Odell
On Mon, 20 Apr 2020 17:26:10 GMT, Chris McMillan
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Dumrat
Post by BrritSki
Wow, this is really interesting...
http://youtu.be/bfN2JWifLCY
34'53": "Why lockdowns are the wrong policy - Swedish expert Prof. Johan Giesecke".
Biting them in the back now, though, isn't it - unless you agree with felling your entire
elderly population who are living in care in one fell swoop, that is?
https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/apr/19/anger-in-sweden-as-elderly-pay-price-for-coronavirus-strategy
Discovered yesterday that mum’s home has had some deaths and the senior
manager was tested positive on Fri but was able to email me on Saturday.
Mum hasn’t responded to rehydration: nothing to be done now. The dementia
is too far entrenched now. No,one knows how long she can live.
It’s what it is.
Very sorry to hear this, Chris.
Our thoughts and prayers are with you all.
And from here.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
From here as well. What a dreadful situation for you.
--
Min
Joe Kerr
2020-04-20 18:31:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chris McMillan
Discovered yesterday that mum’s home has had some deaths and the senior
manager was tested positive on Fri but was able to email me on Saturday.
Mum hasn’t responded to rehydration: nothing to be done now. The dementia
is too far entrenched now. No,one knows how long she can live.
It’s what it is.
Best Chris
I hope it all goes well, Chris. (By whatever definition of "well" you
prefer.)
--
Ric
BrritSki
2020-04-20 19:04:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chris McMillan
Discovered yesterday that mum’s home has had some deaths and the senior
manager was tested positive on Fri but was able to email me on Saturday.
Mum hasn’t responded to rehydration: nothing to be done now.  The
dementia
is too far entrenched now. No,one knows how long she can live.
It’s what it is.
Best Chris
I hope it all goes well, Chris. (By whatever definition  of "well" you
prefer.)
<lw>
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-04-20 19:46:16 UTC
Reply
Permalink
[]
I hope it all goes well, Chris. (By whatever definition  of "well"
you prefer.)
<lw>
From me too.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Eve had an Apple, Adam had a Wang...
Serena Blanchflower
2020-04-20 19:43:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chris McMillan
Discovered yesterday that mum’s home has had some deaths and the senior
manager was tested positive on Fri but was able to email me on Saturday.
Mum hasn’t responded to rehydration: nothing to be done now.  The
dementia
is too far entrenched now. No,one knows how long she can live.
It’s what it is.
Best Chris
I hope it all goes well, Chris. (By whatever definition  of "well" you
prefer.)
As do I.
--
Happy hibernating and stay well,
best wishes, Serena
I love people who make me laugh. I honestly think it's the thing I like
most, to laugh. It cures a multitude of ills. It's probably the most
important thing in a person. (Audrey Hepburn)
Jenny M Benson
2020-04-20 18:34:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chris McMillan
Discovered yesterday that mum’s home has had some deaths and the senior
manager was tested positive on Fri but was able to email me on Saturday.
Mum hasn’t responded to rehydration: nothing to be done now. The dementia
is too far entrenched now. No,one knows how long she can live.
It’s what it is.
My Mum was perfectly compos mentis in her late 90s but developed a
severe depression and stopped eating for several weeks. Eventually she
consented to medication and the depression started to lift and she
decided to start eating again. But it was too late, the damage had been
done and she died after a few months. Had she not kept on drinking when
she was not eating, her end would have come a lot sooner and in so many
ways that would have been better for her and for those who loved her.

You have my sympthy, Chris.
--
Jenny M Benson
Wrexham, UK
Chris McMillan
2020-04-23 07:05:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Chris McMillan
Discovered yesterday that mum’s home has had some deaths and the senior
manager was tested positive on Fri but was able to email me on Saturday.
Mum hasn’t responded to rehydration: nothing to be done now. The dementia
is too far entrenched now. No,one knows how long she can live.
It’s what it is.
My Mum was perfectly compos mentis in her late 90s but developed a
severe depression and stopped eating for several weeks. Eventually she
consented to medication and the depression started to lift and she
decided to start eating again. But it was too late, the damage had been
done and she died after a few months. Had she not kept on drinking when
she was not eating, her end would have come a lot sooner and in so many
ways that would have been better for her and for those who loved her.
You have my sympthy, Chris.
Mum knows, in her words’ to ride to the occasion’. Because staff were
concerned and rapid response were in on Wed, she was given a device which
enabled liquid to be given as if it were at a drinking pace and rehydrated
her. It was administered for five days. No she wouldn’t eat. Yesterday an
nhs nurse rang to say she had managed to get her to eat choc chip ice
cream. I had a long chat and looked forward to talking to her named nurse.
She was on a day off, but another nurse, I think her oppo, said she was
‘alert’. Alert? Antsy, not that .i think this young foreigner would know
the word. She would have nothing, even her meds. Not that that surprised
me. They were an early battle. Yet again, somewhere, something in her
nature returns to respect men, and authority, specially medical ones.

Not now expecting any better news. Food will be offered but never forced.
As a nursing home she will be cared for by the two nurses over a 24 hr
shift.

Sincerely Chris
Vicky Ayech
2020-04-23 07:46:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 23 Apr 2020 07:05:55 GMT, Chris McMillan
Mum knows, in her words’ to ride to the occasion’. Because staff were
concerned and rapid response were in on Wed, she was given a device which
enabled liquid to be given as if it were at a drinking pace and rehydrated
her. It was administered for five days. No she wouldn’t eat. Yesterday an
nhs nurse rang to say she had managed to get her to eat choc chip ice
cream. I had a long chat and looked forward to talking to her named nurse.
She was on a day off, but another nurse, I think her oppo, said she was
‘alert’. Alert? Antsy, not that .i think this young foreigner would know
the word. She would have nothing, even her meds. Not that that surprised
me. They were an early battle. Yet again, somewhere, something in her
nature returns to respect men, and authority, specially medical ones.
Not now expecting any better news. Food will be offered but never forced.
As a nursing home she will be cared for by the two nurses over a 24 hr
shift.
Sincerely Chris
My mum refused medication while she was at home but once in a home,
aftr a hospital spell, she seemed to accept the carers as nurses and
an authority who she took meds from. She was always keen onfood,
although mushed, right to the end. She threw the medicine at me when
still at home when I tried to get her to take it. The personality
change then was difficult tomanage. In the home she was docile. It
was obviously sad for me at the time but I can imagine how much more
difficult it is with the Corona Virus and lockdown. I hope for
peaceful time from now for your family, Chris.
Paul Herber
2020-04-20 18:57:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dumrat
Post by BrritSki
Wow, this is really interesting...
http://youtu.be/bfN2JWifLCY
34'53": "Why lockdowns are the wrong policy - Swedish expert Prof. Johan Giesecke".
Biting them in the back now, though, isn't it - unless you agree with felling your entire
elderly population who are living in care in one fell swoop, that is?
https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/apr/19/anger-in-sweden-as-elderly-pay-price-for-coronavirus-strategy
Discovered yesterday that mum’s home has had some deaths and the senior
manager was tested positive on Fri but was able to email me on Saturday.
Mum hasn’t responded to rehydration: nothing to be done now. The dementia
is too far entrenched now. No,one knows how long she can live.
It’s what it is.
Best Chris
<hugs>
--
Regards, Paul Herber
https://www.paulherber.co.uk/
Sam Plusnet
2020-04-20 21:06:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Dumrat
Post by BrritSki
Wow, this is really interesting...
http://youtu.be/bfN2JWifLCY
34'53": "Why lockdowns are the wrong policy - Swedish expert Prof. Johan Giesecke".
Biting them in the back now, though, isn't it - unless you agree with felling your entire
elderly population who are living in care in one fell swoop, that is?
https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/apr/19/anger-in-sweden-as-elderly-pay-price-for-coronavirus-strategy
Discovered yesterday that mum’s home has had some deaths and the senior
manager was tested positive on Fri but was able to email me on Saturday.
Mum hasn’t responded to rehydration: nothing to be done now. The dementia
is too far entrenched now. No,one knows how long she can live.
It’s what it is.
I'm so sorry Chris.
Thinking of you & yours.
--
Sam Plusnet
steveski
2020-04-21 00:42:44 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Mon, 20 Apr 2020 17:26:10 +0000, Chris McMillan wrote:

[]
Post by Chris McMillan
Discovered yesterday that mum’s home has had some deaths and the senior
manager was tested positive on Fri but was able to email me on Saturday.
Mum hasn’t responded to rehydration: nothing to be done now. The
dementia is too far entrenched now. No,one knows how long she can live.
It’s what it is.
Very sorry to hear that, Chris. My best thoughts are with you.
--
Steveski
Kate B
2020-04-21 17:37:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Dumrat
Post by BrritSki
Wow, this is really interesting...
http://youtu.be/bfN2JWifLCY
34'53": "Why lockdowns are the wrong policy - Swedish expert Prof. Johan Giesecke".
Biting them in the back now, though, isn't it - unless you agree with felling your entire
elderly population who are living in care in one fell swoop, that is?
https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/apr/19/anger-in-sweden-as-elderly-pay-price-for-coronavirus-strategy
Discovered yesterday that mum’s home has had some deaths and the senior
manager was tested positive on Fri but was able to email me on Saturday.
Mum hasn’t responded to rehydration: nothing to be done now. The dementia
is too far entrenched now. No,one knows how long she can live.
It’s what it is.
Best Chris
Oh dear Chris, how extremely sad. And at a time like this too. Am
thinking of you. Much love xxx
--
Kate B
London
Penny
2020-04-21 18:12:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Tue, 21 Apr 2020 18:37:12 +0100, Kate B <***@nospam.demon.co.uk>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Kate B
Post by Chris McMillan
Discovered yesterday that mum’s home has had some deaths and the senior
manager was tested positive on Fri but was able to email me on Saturday.
Mum hasn’t responded to rehydration: nothing to be done now. The dementia
is too far entrenched now. No,one knows how long she can live.
It’s what it is.
Best Chris
Oh dear Chris, how extremely sad. And at a time like this too. Am
thinking of you. Much love xxx
From me too.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Peter Percival
2020-04-24 15:00:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by BrritSki
Wow, this is really interesting...
http://youtu.be/bfN2JWifLCY
So far as the BBC is concerned, the idea seems to be to gloat about the
large number of deaths there are in the US in order to be critical of
President Trump. But whoever wrote this:

"The United States, for example, has far more Covid-19 deaths than any
other country - as of 20 April, a total of over 40,000 deaths.

But the US has a population of 330 million people.

If you take the five largest countries in Western Europe - the UK,
Germany, France, Italy and Spain - their combined population is roughly
320 million.

And the total number of registered coronavirus deaths from those five
countries, as of 20 April, was over 85,000 - more than twice that of the
US."

must have missed the briefing because they've accidentally told the truth.

(It was Chris Morris & Anthony Reuben at
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/52311014.)
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-04-24 15:57:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Fri, 24 Apr 2020 at 16:00:59, Peter Percival
Post by Peter Percival
Post by BrritSki
Wow, this is really interesting...
http://youtu.be/bfN2JWifLCY
So far as the BBC is concerned, the idea seems to be to gloat about the
large number of deaths there are in the US in order to be critical of
"The United States, for example, has far more Covid-19 deaths than any
other country - as of 20 April, a total of over 40,000 deaths.
But the US has a population of 330 million people.
If you take the five largest countries in Western Europe - the UK,
Germany, France, Italy and Spain - their combined population is roughly
320 million.
And the total number of registered coronavirus deaths from those five
countries, as of 20 April, was over 85,000 - more than twice that of
the US."
So even without UK (16,509 on the 20th) the USE has far more than the
USA.

Not quoting with account of population size is pointless, so why do they
keep doing it? The media (_most_, not all, of them) just do not
understand ratios, is the only reason I can think of. (Sure, I've seen
lots of arguments saying that isn't the whole story - population
density, clustering, demographics [old/young, other]; however, if the
choice is only total bald figures or totals per 1m population, the
latter us surely more informative than the former.)
Post by Peter Percival
must have missed the briefing because they've accidentally told the truth.
(It was Chris Morris & Anthony Reuben at
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/52311014.)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

I used to dream of the day when linux was as stable as windows. Never did I
imagine that parity would be achieved by windows declining into the chaos that
engulfs and stifles linux.
- mike <***@netzero.net> in alt.windows7.general, 2018-4-1
John Ashby
2020-04-24 18:52:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter Percival
Post by BrritSki
Wow, this is really interesting...
http://youtu.be/bfN2JWifLCY
So far as the BBC is concerned, the idea seems to be to gloat about the
large number of deaths there are in the US in order to be critical of
"The United States, for example, has far more Covid-19 deaths than any
other country - as of 20 April, a total of over 40,000 deaths.
But the US has a population of 330 million people.
If you take the five largest countries in Western Europe - the UK,
Germany, France, Italy and Spain - their combined population is roughly
320 million.
And the total number of registered coronavirus deaths from those five
countries, as of 20 April, was over 85,000 - more than twice that of the
US."
must have missed the briefing because they've accidentally told the truth.
(It was Chris Morris & Anthony Reuben at
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/52311014.)
So they get criticised in your first paragraph for one thing and then
criticised in your penultimate one for the opposite. Can they ever win?

john
Kate B
2020-04-25 11:52:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by John Ashby
Post by Peter Percival
Post by BrritSki
Wow, this is really interesting...
http://youtu.be/bfN2JWifLCY
So far as the BBC is concerned, the idea seems to be to gloat about
the large number of deaths there are in the US in order to be critical
"The United States, for example, has far more Covid-19 deaths than any
other country - as of 20 April, a total of over 40,000 deaths.
But the US has a population of 330 million people.
If you take the five largest countries in Western Europe - the UK,
Germany, France, Italy and Spain - their combined population is
roughly 320 million.
And the total number of registered coronavirus deaths from those five
countries, as of 20 April, was over 85,000 - more than twice that of
the US."
must have missed the briefing because they've accidentally told the truth.
(It was Chris Morris & Anthony Reuben at
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/52311014.)
So they get criticised in your first paragraph for one thing and then
criticised in your penultimate one for the opposite. Can they ever win?
john
None of this is much use because every country provides differently
reckoned data, and I suspect the data from the USA is not actually very
comprehensive.
--
Kate B
London
Peter Percival
2020-04-25 14:52:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by John Ashby
Post by Peter Percival
Post by BrritSki
Wow, this is really interesting...
http://youtu.be/bfN2JWifLCY
So far as the BBC is concerned, the idea seems to be to gloat about
the large number of deaths there are in the US in order to be critical
"The United States, for example, has far more Covid-19 deaths than any
other country - as of 20 April, a total of over 40,000 deaths.
But the US has a population of 330 million people.
If you take the five largest countries in Western Europe - the UK,
Germany, France, Italy and Spain - their combined population is
roughly 320 million.
And the total number of registered coronavirus deaths from those five
countries, as of 20 April, was over 85,000 - more than twice that of
the US."
must have missed the briefing because they've accidentally told the truth.
(It was Chris Morris & Anthony Reuben at
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/52311014.)
So they get criticised in your first paragraph for one thing and then
criticised in your penultimate one for the opposite. Can they ever win?
john
There are two theys, are there not mon amie (I've been listening to Lord
Edgware Dies)? The they which is the World Service news reports the
number of deaths in the US with distasteful glee. Are they really
gleeful about so many deaths? I doubt it, but they jump from those
figures to attacks on Trump with all the agility of a mountain goat.
And the more deaths there are, the ammunition they have (they think) to
attack Trump. The other they is the BBC news website which takes the
same data and presents it rather more honestly.
Peter Percival
2020-04-26 18:52:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by John Ashby
Post by Peter Percival
Post by BrritSki
Wow, this is really interesting...
http://youtu.be/bfN2JWifLCY
So far as the BBC is concerned, the idea seems to be to gloat about
the large number of deaths there are in the US in order to be critical
"The United States, for example, has far more Covid-19 deaths than any
other country - as of 20 April, a total of over 40,000 deaths.
But the US has a population of 330 million people.
If you take the five largest countries in Western Europe - the UK,
Germany, France, Italy and Spain - their combined population is
roughly 320 million.
And the total number of registered coronavirus deaths from those five
countries, as of 20 April, was over 85,000 - more than twice that of
the US."
must have missed the briefing because they've accidentally told the truth.
(It was Chris Morris & Anthony Reuben at
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/52311014.)
So they get criticised in your first paragraph for one thing
Yes.
Post by John Ashby
and then
criticised in your penultimate one for the opposite.
No. There is no intended criticism there.
Post by John Ashby
Can they ever win?
john
John Ashby
2020-04-26 21:37:13 UTC
Reply
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Post by John Ashby
Post by Peter Percival
Post by BrritSki
Wow, this is really interesting...
http://youtu.be/bfN2JWifLCY
So far as the BBC is concerned, the idea seems to be to gloat about
the large number of deaths there are in the US in order to be
"The United States, for example, has far more Covid-19 deaths than
any other country - as of 20 April, a total of over 40,000 deaths.
But the US has a population of 330 million people.
If you take the five largest countries in Western Europe - the UK,
Germany, France, Italy and Spain - their combined population is
roughly 320 million.
And the total number of registered coronavirus deaths from those five
countries, as of 20 April, was over 85,000 - more than twice that of
the US."
must have missed the briefing because they've accidentally told the truth.
(It was Chris Morris & Anthony Reuben at
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/52311014.)
So they get criticised in your first paragraph for one thing
Yes.
Post by John Ashby
and then criticised in your penultimate one for the opposite.
No.  There is no intended criticism there.
Two suggestions of incompetence: "missed the briefing" and
"accidentally". You may believe you weren't criticising, but your
comment follows the pattern of remarks in the commercial media
(particularly some newspapers) denigrating the BBC whatever it does.

john
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