Discussion:
umra tv club
(too old to reply)
Vicky Ayech
2019-12-28 11:36:29 UTC
Permalink
We watched the Christmas Call the Midwife last night. I liked the calf
and thought it acted well. They ran out of the books a while back and
that was noticeable. They may have actually jumped the shark though
now. B thought Worst Episode Ever, but I am not quite sure.

I'm reading the books and there was a lot about the world inthe area
generally that was not covered in the programmes. It was very sad for
the most part and depressing.

Ok I am a GOW.
krw
2019-12-29 23:01:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
They may have actually jumped the shark though
now. B thought Worst Episode Ever, but I am not quite sure.
I would agree that it was perhaps not up to the normal standard. An
article read about the programme linked it to a book about medical
services in the Scottish Isles pre-war (and pre-NHS). For some time it
has been casting light on medical advances and changes through the late
fifties into the early sixties and I think it has given a marvellous run
of employment to Jenny Agutter and so on.

For another series which is reeling me in please watch "World on Fire".
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Sid Nuncius
2019-12-30 07:13:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by krw
For another series which is reeling me in please watch "World on Fire".
FWIW, I thought the first two episodes of Wisting on Saturday night were
promising. Nothing exceptional, but well made, good atmosphere, good
acting and I like the sound of the Norwegian (when they speak it).
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
BrritSki
2019-12-30 10:25:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by krw
For another series which is reeling me in please watch "World on Fire".
FWIW, I thought the first two episodes of Wisting on Saturday night were
promising.  Nothing exceptional, but well made, good atmosphere, good
acting and I like the sound of the Norwegian (when they speak it).
We enjoyed it too, but I thought there was something familiar about the
cop with journo daughter setup, so I looked back at my ARCs and there
they were in The Katharina Code. Is that one you downloaded too ? My
review was only 3*...
BrritSki
2019-12-30 10:39:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by BrritSki
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by krw
For another series which is reeling me in please watch "World on Fire".
FWIW, I thought the first two episodes of Wisting on Saturday night
were promising.  Nothing exceptional, but well made, good atmosphere,
good acting and I like the sound of the Norwegian (when they speak it).
We enjoyed it too, but I thought there was something familiar about the
cop with journo daughter setup, so I looked back at my ARCs and there
they were in The Katharina Code. Is that one you downloaded too ?  My
review was only 3*...
And I now see that you didn't think much of Wisting in The Cabin as
recently as last month ! :)
Sid Nuncius
2019-12-30 19:56:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by BrritSki
Post by BrritSki
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by krw
For another series which is reeling me in please watch "World on Fire".
FWIW, I thought the first two episodes of Wisting on Saturday night
were promising.  Nothing exceptional, but well made, good atmosphere,
good acting and I like the sound of the Norwegian (when they speak it).
We enjoyed it too, but I thought there was something familiar about
the cop with journo daughter setup, so I looked back at my ARCs and
there they were in The Katharina Code. Is that one you downloaded too
?  My review was only 3*...
And I now see that you didn't think much of Wisting in The Cabin as
recently as last month !   :)
No, I thought the book was very badly written/translated. I gave the TV
adaptation a go because it circumvents that, and I think they've done a
decent job so far. It may turn out to be tosh in the end, of course. 😊
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
BrritSki
2019-12-30 20:14:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by BrritSki
Post by BrritSki
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by krw
For another series which is reeling me in please watch "World on Fire".
FWIW, I thought the first two episodes of Wisting on Saturday night
were promising.  Nothing exceptional, but well made, good
atmosphere, good acting and I like the sound of the Norwegian (when
they speak it).
We enjoyed it too, but I thought there was something familiar about
the cop with journo daughter setup, so I looked back at my ARCs and
there they were in The Katharina Code. Is that one you downloaded too
?  My review was only 3*...
And I now see that you didn't think much of Wisting in The Cabin as
recently as last month !   :)
No, I thought the book was very badly written/translated.  I gave the TV
adaptation a go because it circumvents that, and I think they've done a
decent job so far.  It may turn out to be tosh in the end, of course.  😊
True. Interesting that there's always this harking back to old cases in
all 3 plots that I've read up on. I wonder of the author, who was a
policeman, has something on his mind ?
Sam Plusnet
2019-12-30 20:36:54 UTC
Permalink
No, I thought the book was very badly written/translated.  I gave the TV
adaptation a go because it circumvents that, and I think they've done a
decent job so far.  It may turn out to be tosh in the end, of course.  😊
I didn't realise that "tosh" had a specific meaning in cricket.

(stolen from the OED)

tosh, n.2 slang.

(tɒʃ)

Bosh, trash; nonsense, rubbish, twaddle; in Cricket, see quot. 1898.

   1892 Oxf. Univ. Mag. 26 Oct. 26/1 To think what I've gone through to
hear that man! Frightful tosh it'll be, too.    1898 Tit-Bits 25 June
252/3 Among the recent neologisms of the cricket field is ‘tosh’, which
means bowling of contemptible easiness.
--
Sam Plusnet
Mike
2019-12-30 08:50:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by krw
Post by Vicky Ayech
They may have actually jumped the shark though
now. B thought Worst Episode Ever, but I am not quite sure.
I would agree that it was perhaps not up to the normal standard. An
article read about the programme linked it to a book about medical
services in the Scottish Isles pre-war (and pre-NHS). For some time it
has been casting light on medical advances and changes through the late
fifties into the early sixties and I think it has given a marvellous run
of employment to Jenny Agutter and so on.
For another series which is reeling me in please watch "World on Fire".
An Australian production?
--
Toodle Pip
Vicky Ayech
2019-12-30 09:32:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by krw
Post by Vicky Ayech
They may have actually jumped the shark though
now. B thought Worst Episode Ever, but I am not quite sure.
I would agree that it was perhaps not up to the normal standard. An
article read about the programme linked it to a book about medical
services in the Scottish Isles pre-war (and pre-NHS). For some time it
has been casting light on medical advances and changes through the late
fifties into the early sixties and I think it has given a marvellous run
of employment to Jenny Agutter and so on.
For another series which is reeling me in please watch "World on Fire".
An Australian production?
BTN
Sid Nuncius
2019-12-30 09:53:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by krw
For another series which is reeling me in please watch "World on Fire".
An Australian production?
BTN
Yes.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
SODAM
2019-12-30 10:49:28 UTC
Permalink
Yes.
Please can an umrat help me refind a TV programme? I enjoyed several
episodes before the calendar went haywire. My TV will remind me as a
one-off but not follow a series and I can’t remember its name so I can‘t
watch it on catch up.

It was set in Vienna(?) and was about a trainee doctor who was working with
a detective, trying out the new-fangled science of psychology. I thought it
might have been called “ Wiener Blut” but that might just have the title of
an episode because it’s not advertised under that title.
--
SODAM
The thinking umrat’s choice for editor
Vicky Ayech
2019-12-30 11:49:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by SODAM
Yes.
Please can an umrat help me refind a TV programme? I enjoyed several
episodes before the calendar went haywire. My TV will remind me as a
one-off but not follow a series and I can’t remember its name so I can‘t
watch it on catch up.
It was set in Vienna(?) and was about a trainee doctor who was working with
a detective, trying out the new-fangled science of psychology. I thought it
might have been called “ Wiener Blut” but that might just have the title of
an episode because it’s not advertised under that title.
Vienna Blood. I did consider watching it. Are you enjoying it? I'd
probably like the venue scenes....
Vicky Ayech
2019-12-30 11:52:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by SODAM
Yes.
Please can an umrat help me refind a TV programme? I enjoyed several
episodes before the calendar went haywire. My TV will remind me as a
one-off but not follow a series and I can’t remember its name so I can‘t
watch it on catch up.
It was set in Vienna(?) and was about a trainee doctor who was working with
a detective, trying out the new-fangled science of psychology. I thought it
might have been called “ Wiener Blut” but that might just have the title of
an episode because it’s not advertised under that title.
It says 3 part series so if you've seen several that is probably all
of them.
krw
2019-12-30 13:07:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by SODAM
Yes.
Please can an umrat help me refind a TV programme? I enjoyed several
episodes before the calendar went haywire. My TV will remind me as a
one-off but not follow a series and I can’t remember its name so I can‘t
watch it on catch up.
It was set in Vienna(?) and was about a trainee doctor who was working with
a detective, trying out the new-fangled science of psychology. I thought it
might have been called “ Wiener Blut” but that might just have the title of
an episode because it’s not advertised under that title.
It says 3 part series so if you've seen several that is probably all
of them.
Watched the first one but did not think there was enough to justify the
other two.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
SODAM
2019-12-30 15:54:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by krw
Watched the first one but did not think there was enough to justify the
other two.
I thought the young actor playing the main part was very charismatic and
enjoyed his gritty partnership with the older detective. I also liked the
costumes and sets, which evoked the period very well.
--
SODAM
The thinking umrat’s choice for editor
Kate B
2019-12-30 16:51:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by SODAM
Post by krw
Watched the first one but did not think there was enough to justify the
other two.
I thought the young actor playing the main part was very charismatic and
enjoyed his gritty partnership with the older detective. I also liked the
costumes and sets, which evoked the period very well.
Loved the costumes and sets (many of which were I suspect substantially
real and not studio sets, at least the outdoor ones - just imagine
clearing the spaces outside the Hofburg for filming!), quite liked the
characters, thought Clara a most admirable person and very hardly done
by, thought the psychological stuff really clumsily stuck on; but most
of all wondered why they didn't just film it in German. The actors,
nearly all of whom were Austrian, spoke English remarkably well but
would have seemed so much more natural if they had spoken Viennese.
We're all used to subtitles now, it would have surely been easier!
--
Kate B
London
Kate B
2019-12-30 17:36:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kate B
Post by SODAM
Post by krw
Watched the first one but did not think there was enough to justify the
other two.
I thought the young actor playing the main part was very charismatic and
enjoyed his gritty partnership with the older detective. I also liked the
costumes and sets, which evoked the period very well.
Loved the costumes and sets (many of which were I suspect substantially
real and not studio sets, at least the outdoor ones - just imagine
clearing the spaces outside the Hofburg for filming!), quite liked the
characters, thought Clara a most admirable person and very hardly done
by, thought the psychological stuff really clumsily stuck on; but most
of all wondered why they didn't just film it in German. The actors,
nearly all of whom were Austrian, spoke English remarkably well but
would have seemed so much more natural if they had spoken Viennese.
We're all used to subtitles now, it would have surely been easier!
Just a small point Kate, not quite all of us are ‘used to subtitles’, to me
they make any non-English scripting totally useless as I cannot read
them:-((( . Many a detective series (for instance) is sadly rejected as I
cannot follow them.
Sorry, perhaps 'all' was a bit general. At home here we rely on
subtitles because the best beloved is profoundly deaf - we miss out on
too many old films and potentially great series on the streaming
channels because they don't have them.
--
Kate B
London
Mike
2019-12-30 17:49:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kate B
Post by Kate B
Post by SODAM
Post by krw
Watched the first one but did not think there was enough to justify the
other two.
I thought the young actor playing the main part was very charismatic and
enjoyed his gritty partnership with the older detective. I also liked the
costumes and sets, which evoked the period very well.
Loved the costumes and sets (many of which were I suspect substantially
real and not studio sets, at least the outdoor ones - just imagine
clearing the spaces outside the Hofburg for filming!), quite liked the
characters, thought Clara a most admirable person and very hardly done
by, thought the psychological stuff really clumsily stuck on; but most
of all wondered why they didn't just film it in German. The actors,
nearly all of whom were Austrian, spoke English remarkably well but
would have seemed so much more natural if they had spoken Viennese.
We're all used to subtitles now, it would have surely been easier!
Just a small point Kate, not quite all of us are ‘used to subtitles’, to me
they make any non-English scripting totally useless as I cannot read
them:-((( . Many a detective series (for instance) is sadly rejected as I
cannot follow them.
Sorry, perhaps 'all' was a bit general. At home here we rely on
subtitles because the best beloved is profoundly deaf - we miss out on
too many old films and potentially great series on the streaming
channels because they don't have them.
Though I do still wonder how viewers get on with watching the pictures AND
reading all the subtitles; is there not a ‘distraction’ factor having to
divert one’s view from the main picture to concentrate on the text? I can
see how a viewer can watch AND listen but am not sure how managing to read
subtitles as well as watching the main image can work well. I accept that I
cannot do it but then, I’m ‘special’ ;-)))
0
--
Toodle Pip
SODAM
2019-12-30 18:32:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by Kate B
Post by Kate B
Post by SODAM
Post by krw
Watched the first one but did not think there was enough to justify the
other two.
I thought the young actor playing the main part was very charismatic and
enjoyed his gritty partnership with the older detective. I also liked the
costumes and sets, which evoked the period very well.
Loved the costumes and sets (many of which were I suspect substantially
real and not studio sets, at least the outdoor ones - just imagine
clearing the spaces outside the Hofburg for filming!), quite liked the
characters, thought Clara a most admirable person and very hardly done
by, thought the psychological stuff really clumsily stuck on; but most
of all wondered why they didn't just film it in German. The actors,
nearly all of whom were Austrian, spoke English remarkably well but
would have seemed so much more natural if they had spoken Viennese.
We're all used to subtitles now, it would have surely been easier!
Just a small point Kate, not quite all of us are ‘used to subtitles’, to me
they make any non-English scripting totally useless as I cannot read
them:-((( . Many a detective series (for instance) is sadly rejected as I
cannot follow them.
Sorry, perhaps 'all' was a bit general. At home here we rely on
subtitles because the best beloved is profoundly deaf - we miss out on
too many old films and potentially great series on the streaming
channels because they don't have them.
Though I do still wonder how viewers get on with watching the pictures AND
reading all the subtitles; is there not a ‘distraction’ factor having to
divert one’s view from the main picture to concentrate on the text? I can
see how a viewer can watch AND listen but am not sure how managing to read
subtitles as well as watching the main image can work well. I accept that I
cannot do it but then, I’m ‘special’ ;-)))
0
I am fortunate to have good hearing and sight and don’t find it difficult
to read subtitles because they can be taken in at a glance, so don’t
distract from the main image. However, I have thought recently that I might
turn them on because of the lamentable diction of some (especially younger)
actors and (often) film actors. It seems to be fashionable to think it cool
to talk with the the mouth barely open and pronouncing final ‘t’ or ‘d’ is
anathema.

What a treat it is to hear old recordings of such models of clarity as Sir
John Gielgud, with every syllable audible.
--
SODAM
The thinking umrat’s choice for editor
Jim Easterbrook
2019-12-30 18:46:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by SODAM
I am fortunate to have good hearing and sight and don’t find it
difficult to read subtitles because they can be taken in at a glance, so
don’t distract from the main image. However, I have thought recently
that I might turn them on because of the lamentable diction of some
(especially younger) actors and (often) film actors.
I once tried that when watching Rab C Nesbitt. It didn't help.
--
Jim <http://www.jim-easterbrook.me.uk/>
1959/1985? M B+ G+ A L- I- S- P-- CH0(p) Ar++ T+ H0 Q--- Sh0
Vicky Ayech
2019-12-30 18:47:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by Kate B
Post by Kate B
Post by SODAM
Post by krw
Watched the first one but did not think there was enough to justify the
other two.
I thought the young actor playing the main part was very charismatic and
enjoyed his gritty partnership with the older detective. I also liked the
costumes and sets, which evoked the period very well.
Loved the costumes and sets (many of which were I suspect substantially
real and not studio sets, at least the outdoor ones - just imagine
clearing the spaces outside the Hofburg for filming!), quite liked the
characters, thought Clara a most admirable person and very hardly done
by, thought the psychological stuff really clumsily stuck on; but most
of all wondered why they didn't just film it in German. The actors,
nearly all of whom were Austrian, spoke English remarkably well but
would have seemed so much more natural if they had spoken Viennese.
We're all used to subtitles now, it would have surely been easier!
Just a small point Kate, not quite all of us are ‘used to subtitles’, to me
they make any non-English scripting totally useless as I cannot read
them:-((( . Many a detective series (for instance) is sadly rejected as I
cannot follow them.
Sorry, perhaps 'all' was a bit general. At home here we rely on
subtitles because the best beloved is profoundly deaf - we miss out on
too many old films and potentially great series on the streaming
channels because they don't have them.
Though I do still wonder how viewers get on with watching the pictures AND
reading all the subtitles; is there not a ‘distraction’ factor having to
divert one’s view from the main picture to concentrate on the text? I can
see how a viewer can watch AND listen but am not sure how managing to read
subtitles as well as watching the main image can work well. I accept that I
cannot do it but then, I’m ‘special’ ;-)))
0
I am fortunate to have good hearing and sight and don’t find it difficult
to read subtitles because they can be taken in at a glance, so don’t
distract from the main image. However, I have thought recently that I might
turn them on because of the lamentable diction of some (especially younger)
actors and (often) film actors. It seems to be fashionable to think it cool
to talk with the the mouth barely open and pronouncing final ‘t’ or ‘d’ is
anathema.
What a treat it is to hear old recordings of such models of clarity as Sir
John Gielgud, with every syllable audible.
I quite often do need the sub titles as well as having my hearing aids
in and sometimes find the having to read a distraction and am not fast
enough. I think my mind is just slowing up.
Kate B
2019-12-30 21:04:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by SODAM
Post by Mike
Post by Kate B
Post by Kate B
Post by SODAM
Post by krw
Watched the first one but did not think there was enough to justify the
other two.
I thought the young actor playing the main part was very charismatic and
enjoyed his gritty partnership with the older detective. I also liked the
costumes and sets, which evoked the period very well.
Loved the costumes and sets (many of which were I suspect substantially
real and not studio sets, at least the outdoor ones - just imagine
clearing the spaces outside the Hofburg for filming!), quite liked the
characters, thought Clara a most admirable person and very hardly done
by, thought the psychological stuff really clumsily stuck on; but most
of all wondered why they didn't just film it in German. The actors,
nearly all of whom were Austrian, spoke English remarkably well but
would have seemed so much more natural if they had spoken Viennese.
We're all used to subtitles now, it would have surely been easier!
Just a small point Kate, not quite all of us are ‘used to subtitles’, to me
they make any non-English scripting totally useless as I cannot read
them:-((( . Many a detective series (for instance) is sadly rejected as I
cannot follow them.
Sorry, perhaps 'all' was a bit general. At home here we rely on
subtitles because the best beloved is profoundly deaf - we miss out on
too many old films and potentially great series on the streaming
channels because they don't have them.
Though I do still wonder how viewers get on with watching the pictures AND
reading all the subtitles; is there not a ‘distraction’ factor having to
divert one’s view from the main picture to concentrate on the text? I can
see how a viewer can watch AND listen but am not sure how managing to read
subtitles as well as watching the main image can work well. I accept that I
cannot do it but then, I’m ‘special’ ;-)))
0
I am fortunate to have good hearing and sight and don’t find it difficult
to read subtitles because they can be taken in at a glance, so don’t
distract from the main image. However, I have thought recently that I might
turn them on because of the lamentable diction of some (especially younger)
actors and (often) film actors. It seems to be fashionable to think it cool
to talk with the the mouth barely open and pronouncing final ‘t’ or ‘d’ is
anathema.
What a treat it is to hear old recordings of such models of clarity as Sir
John Gielgud, with every syllable audible.
We don't have subtitles on live BBC One since we usually only watch the
news there in real time and live subtitling is still terrible. Most
newsreaders are fine (and of course you can read their lips mostly,
too). The Queen's Christmas message didn't need subtitles either.
--
Kate B
London
Kate B
2019-12-30 21:01:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by Kate B
Post by Kate B
Post by SODAM
Post by krw
Watched the first one but did not think there was enough to justify the
other two.
I thought the young actor playing the main part was very charismatic and
enjoyed his gritty partnership with the older detective. I also liked the
costumes and sets, which evoked the period very well.
Loved the costumes and sets (many of which were I suspect substantially
real and not studio sets, at least the outdoor ones - just imagine
clearing the spaces outside the Hofburg for filming!), quite liked the
characters, thought Clara a most admirable person and very hardly done
by, thought the psychological stuff really clumsily stuck on; but most
of all wondered why they didn't just film it in German. The actors,
nearly all of whom were Austrian, spoke English remarkably well but
would have seemed so much more natural if they had spoken Viennese.
We're all used to subtitles now, it would have surely been easier!
Just a small point Kate, not quite all of us are ‘used to subtitles’, to me
they make any non-English scripting totally useless as I cannot read
them:-((( . Many a detective series (for instance) is sadly rejected as I
cannot follow them.
Sorry, perhaps 'all' was a bit general. At home here we rely on
subtitles because the best beloved is profoundly deaf - we miss out on
too many old films and potentially great series on the streaming
channels because they don't have them.
Though I do still wonder how viewers get on with watching the pictures AND
reading all the subtitles; is there not a ‘distraction’ factor having to
divert one’s view from the main picture to concentrate on the text? I can
see how a viewer can watch AND listen but am not sure how managing to read
subtitles as well as watching the main image can work well. I accept that I
cannot do it but then, I’m ‘special’ ;-)))
0
You get used to it. It's a kind of speed-reading - you take in the whole
sentence in one go. It's not as bad as supertitles above the stage in
opera, where you can only see either the titles or the stage.
--
Kate B
London
Joe Kerr
2020-01-01 15:53:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike
Though I do still wonder how viewers get on with watching the pictures AND
reading all the subtitles; is there not a ‘distraction’ factor having to
divert one’s view from the main picture to concentrate on the text? I can
see how a viewer can watch AND listen but am not sure how managing to read
subtitles as well as watching the main image can work well. I accept that I
cannot do it but then, I’m ‘special’ ;-)))
0
I do find them a distraction and used to avoid foreign films for that
reason. In recent times I have managed Scandi Noir without too much
problem. If the soundtrack is in a language I have some knowledge of I
end up playing spot the difference between the audio and text. Sometimes
bits are missed out or even rephrased.

My mother uses subtitles and after watching a program with her I find I
have taken in very little because I was reading the subtitles without
taking in the meaning and tending to ignore the pictures. I have to try
avoiding seeing the subtitles for best effect.
--
Ric
steveski
2020-01-02 17:58:57 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 01 Jan 2020 15:53:15 +0000, Joe Kerr wrote:

[subtitling issues]
If the soundtrack is in a language I have some knowledge of I end up >
playing spot the difference between the audio and text. Sometimes bits
are missed out or even rephrased.
I have the same problems with both Welsh and Norwegian/Swedish.
--
Steveski
Penny
2020-01-02 19:22:44 UTC
Permalink
On 2 Jan 2020 17:58:57 GMT, steveski <***@invalid.com> scrawled in the
dust...
Post by steveski
[subtitling issues]
If the soundtrack is in a language I have some knowledge of I end up >
playing spot the difference between the audio and text. Sometimes bits
are missed out or even rephrased.
I have the same problems with both Welsh and Norwegian/Swedish.
I don't see it as a problem.
Subtitlers don't get a copy of the script, they just transcribe what they
hear and sometimes rephrase for speed (or mistranscribe altogether - it is
not well-paid work).

It is a source of amusement on live broadcasts, particularly the weather
forecast where I have been warned of all sorts of unlikely stuff.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Sally Thompson
2020-01-02 22:01:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
dust...
Post by steveski
[subtitling issues]
If the soundtrack is in a language I have some knowledge of I end up >
playing spot the difference between the audio and text. Sometimes bits
are missed out or even rephrased.
I have the same problems with both Welsh and Norwegian/Swedish.
I don't see it as a problem.
Subtitlers don't get a copy of the script, they just transcribe what they
hear and sometimes rephrase for speed (or mistranscribe altogether - it is
not well-paid work).
It is a source of amusement on live broadcasts, particularly the weather
forecast where I have been warned of all sorts of unlikely stuff.
My favourite ever was "piers of the realm".
--
Sally in Shropshire, UK
John Ashby
2020-01-02 22:56:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Penny
dust...
Post by steveski
[subtitling issues]
If the soundtrack is in a language I have some knowledge of I end up >
playing spot the difference between the audio and text. Sometimes bits
are missed out or even rephrased.
I have the same problems with both Welsh and Norwegian/Swedish.
I don't see it as a problem.
Subtitlers don't get a copy of the script, they just transcribe what they
hear and sometimes rephrase for speed (or mistranscribe altogether - it is
not well-paid work).
It is a source of amusement on live broadcasts, particularly the weather
forecast where I have been warned of all sorts of unlikely stuff.
My favourite ever was "piers of the realm".
That'd be young Gaveston, I presume.

john
Mike
2020-01-03 08:26:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Penny
dust...
Post by steveski
[subtitling issues]
If the soundtrack is in a language I have some knowledge of I end up >
playing spot the difference between the audio and text. Sometimes bits
are missed out or even rephrased.
I have the same problems with both Welsh and Norwegian/Swedish.
I don't see it as a problem.
Subtitlers don't get a copy of the script, they just transcribe what they
hear and sometimes rephrase for speed (or mistranscribe altogether - it is
not well-paid work).
It is a source of amusement on live broadcasts, particularly the weather
forecast where I have been warned of all sorts of unlikely stuff.
My favourite ever was "piers of the realm".
Would that be the Royal Wee?
--
Toodle Pip
Flop
2020-01-03 09:33:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
dust...
Post by steveski
[subtitling issues]
If the soundtrack is in a language I have some knowledge of I end up >
playing spot the difference between the audio and text. Sometimes bits
are missed out or even rephrased.
I have the same problems with both Welsh and Norwegian/Swedish.
I don't see it as a problem.
Subtitlers don't get a copy of the script, they just transcribe what they
hear and sometimes rephrase for speed (or mistranscribe altogether - it is
not well-paid work).
It is a source of amusement on live broadcasts, particularly the weather
forecast where I have been warned of all sorts of unlikely stuff.
What I cannot understand is how a weather reporter can stand there,
reading the text off an autocue, and a completely different text appears
in the sub-titles.

The script must have been written much earlier because the graphics
would have to be generated to match the sript.
--
Flop

Truly the Good Lord gave us computers that we might learn patience
Penny
2020-01-03 10:54:42 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 3 Jan 2020 09:33:13 +0000, Flop <***@flop.knot.me.uk> scrawled in
the dust...
Post by Flop
Post by Penny
dust...
Post by steveski
[subtitling issues]
If the soundtrack is in a language I have some knowledge of I end up >
playing spot the difference between the audio and text. Sometimes bits
are missed out or even rephrased.
I have the same problems with both Welsh and Norwegian/Swedish.
I don't see it as a problem.
Subtitlers don't get a copy of the script, they just transcribe what they
hear and sometimes rephrase for speed (or mistranscribe altogether - it is
not well-paid work).
It is a source of amusement on live broadcasts, particularly the weather
forecast where I have been warned of all sorts of unlikely stuff.
What I cannot understand is how a weather reporter can stand there,
reading the text off an autocue, and a completely different text appears
in the sub-titles.
The script must have been written much earlier because the graphics
would have to be generated to match the sript.
Because 'Subtitlers don't get a copy of the script'.
Jim tells me there is a degree of automation on weather forecast subtitles
but I fear it still needs a lot of work.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
SODAM
2020-01-03 14:40:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Penny
dust...
Post by steveski
[subtitling issues]
If the soundtrack is in a language I have some knowledge of I end up >
playing spot the difference between the audio and text. Sometimes bits
are missed out or even rephrased.
I have the same problems with both Welsh and Norwegian/Swedish.
I don't see it as a problem.
Subtitlers don't get a copy of the script, they just transcribe what they
hear and sometimes rephrase for speed (or mistranscribe altogether - it is
not well-paid work).
It is a source of amusement on live broadcasts, particularly the weather
forecast where I have been warned of all sorts of unlikely stuff.
My favourite ever was "piers of the realm".
I loved (at the appearance of a young woman in Joseph Losey’s DG - Donna
Anna?) “What a sight! It lacerates my viscera.”
--
SODAM
The thinking umrat’s choice for editor
Sam Plusnet
2020-01-03 20:20:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by SODAM
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Penny
dust...
Post by steveski
[subtitling issues]
If the soundtrack is in a language I have some knowledge of I end up >
playing spot the difference between the audio and text. Sometimes bits
are missed out or even rephrased.
I have the same problems with both Welsh and Norwegian/Swedish.
I don't see it as a problem.
Subtitlers don't get a copy of the script, they just transcribe what they
hear and sometimes rephrase for speed (or mistranscribe altogether - it is
not well-paid work).
It is a source of amusement on live broadcasts, particularly the weather
forecast where I have been warned of all sorts of unlikely stuff.
My favourite ever was "piers of the realm".
I loved (at the appearance of a young woman in Joseph Losey’s DG - Donna
Anna?) “What a sight! It lacerates my viscera.”
Well stap me vitals!
--
Sam Plusnet
Tony Smith Gloucestershire
2020-01-02 19:37:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Joe Kerr
Post by Mike
Though I do still wonder how viewers get on with watching the pictures AND
reading all the subtitles; is there not a ‘distraction’ factor having to
divert one’s view from the main picture to concentrate on the text? I can
see how a viewer can watch AND listen but am not sure how managing to read
subtitles as well as watching the main image can work well. I accept that I
cannot do it but then, I’m ‘special’ ;-)))
0
I do find them a distraction and used to avoid foreign films for that
reason. In recent times I have managed Scandi Noir without too much
problem. If the soundtrack is in a language I have some knowledge of I
end up playing spot the difference between the audio and text. Sometimes
bits are missed out or even rephrased.
My mother uses subtitles and after watching a program with her I find I
have taken in very little because I was reading the subtitles without
taking in the meaning and tending to ignore the pictures. I have to try
avoiding seeing the subtitles for best effect.
--
Ric
We once went to an Italian opera (which we already knew) in Prague with Czech surtitles. We managed to deduce the czech for "my God" and "Good Lord" and such like.
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-01-04 01:08:04 UTC
Permalink
In message <516d0b49-c10e-41ad-82c6-***@googlegroups.com>, Tony
Smith Gloucestershire <***@gmail.com> writes:
[]
Post by Tony Smith Gloucestershire
We once went to an Italian opera (which we already knew) in Prague with
Czech surtitles. We managed to deduce the czech for "my God" and "Good
Lord" and such like.
I spent some of my language-formative years in western West Germany, in
reach of Dutch TV; then (late 1960s into '70s - I don't know if still),
they showed a lot of British and American programming, but unlike German
TV, they didn't dub it, just original sound with Dutch subtitles. We
therefore picked up a certain amount of Dutch.

Welterusten (sp?).
["Goodnight".]
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

"Young man, if you think I am going to climb up there you are greatly
mistaken. I am Melba." - Dame Nellie, in June 1920, on being shown the tall
aerials that would enable her voice to be heard around the world.
Joe Kerr
2020-01-04 21:23:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I spent some of my language-formative years in western West Germany, in
reach of Dutch TV; then (late 1960s into '70s - I don't know if still),
they showed a lot of British and American programming, but unlike German
TV, they didn't dub it, just original sound with Dutch subtitles. We
therefore picked up a certain amount of Dutch.
Welterusten (sp?).
["Goodnight".]
I have been told by Dutch people that they learned English from watching
subtitled movies.
--
Ric
Jim Easterbrook
2020-01-04 22:35:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by Joe Kerr
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I spent some of my language-formative years in western West Germany, in
reach of Dutch TV; then (late 1960s into '70s - I don't know if still),
they showed a lot of British and American programming, but unlike
German TV, they didn't dub it, just original sound with Dutch
subtitles. We therefore picked up a certain amount of Dutch.
Welterusten (sp?).
["Goodnight".]
I have been told by Dutch people that they learned English from watching
subtitled movies.
Whilst working on an international project one of my Dutch colleagues
told me her nephew's first words were "Thunderbirds are go!".
--
Jim <http://www.jim-easterbrook.me.uk/>
1959/1985? M B+ G+ A L- I- S- P-- CH0(p) Ar++ T+ H0 Q--- Sh0
Anne B
2020-01-11 12:43:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by Joe Kerr
Post by Mike
Though I do still wonder how viewers get on with watching the pictures AND
reading all the subtitles; is there not a ‘distraction’ factor having to
divert one’s view from the main picture to concentrate on the text? I can
see how a viewer can watch AND listen but am not sure how managing to read
subtitles as well as watching the main image can work well. I accept that I
cannot do it but then, I’m ‘special’ ;-)))
0
I do find them a distraction and used to avoid foreign films for that
reason. In recent times I have managed Scandi Noir without too much
problem. If the soundtrack is in a language I have some knowledge of I
end up playing spot the difference between the audio and text. Sometimes
bits are missed out or even rephrased.
Subtitles aren't nearly as annoying as when they fade the original just
enough to be audible behind dubbed speech, so you can almost listen to
the original but not quite. If they must dub it, I'd much rather they
muted the original altogether, but I'd rather they played the original
at an audible level and added subtitles.

Anne B
Kate B
2020-01-11 14:10:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Anne B
Post by Joe Kerr
Post by Mike
Though I do still wonder how viewers get on with watching the pictures AND
reading all the subtitles; is there not a ‘distraction’ factor having to
divert one’s view from the main picture to concentrate on the text? I can
see how a viewer can watch AND listen but am not sure how managing to read
subtitles as well as watching the main image can work well. I accept that I
cannot do it but then, I’m ‘special’ ;-)))
0
I do find them a distraction and used to avoid foreign films for that
reason. In recent times I have managed Scandi Noir without too much
problem. If the soundtrack is in a language I have some knowledge of I
end up playing spot the difference between the audio and text.
Sometimes bits are missed out or even rephrased.
Subtitles aren't nearly as annoying as when they fade the original just
enough to be audible behind dubbed speech, so you can almost listen to
the original but not quite. If they must dub it, I'd much rather they
muted the original altogether, but I'd rather they played the original
at an audible level and added subtitles.
I deeply dislike dubbed soundtracks. The acoustic is never right and the
acting of the voices never convincing. Worst of all was a series of
Montalbano where they dubbed the German actress playing Silvia - she
sounded as if she was reading the part in a different room entirely from
Salvo.
--
Kate B
London
Mike
2020-01-11 15:42:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kate B
Post by Anne B
Post by Joe Kerr
Post by Mike
Though I do still wonder how viewers get on with watching the pictures AND
reading all the subtitles; is there not a ‘distraction’ factor having to
divert one’s view from the main picture to concentrate on the text? I can
see how a viewer can watch AND listen but am not sure how managing to read
subtitles as well as watching the main image can work well. I accept that I
cannot do it but then, I’m ‘special’ ;-)))
0
I do find them a distraction and used to avoid foreign films for that
reason. In recent times I have managed Scandi Noir without too much
problem. If the soundtrack is in a language I have some knowledge of I
end up playing spot the difference between the audio and text.
Sometimes bits are missed out or even rephrased.
Subtitles aren't nearly as annoying as when they fade the original just
enough to be audible behind dubbed speech, so you can almost listen to
the original but not quite. If they must dub it, I'd much rather they
muted the original altogether, but I'd rather they played the original
at an audible level and added subtitles.
I deeply dislike dubbed soundtracks. The acoustic is never right and the
acting of the voices never convincing. Worst of all was a series of
Montalbano where they dubbed the German actress playing Silvia - she
sounded as if she was reading the part in a different room entirely from
Salvo.
As of course, she would have been!
--
Toodle Pip
Anne B
2020-01-12 10:28:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kate B
Post by Anne B
Post by Joe Kerr
Post by Mike
Though I do still wonder how viewers get on with watching the pictures AND
reading all the subtitles; is there not a ‘distraction’ factor having to
divert one’s view from the main picture to concentrate on the text? I can
see how a viewer can watch AND listen but am not sure how managing to read
subtitles as well as watching the main image can work well. I accept that I
cannot do it but then, I’m ‘special’ ;-)))
0
I do find them a distraction and used to avoid foreign films for that
reason. In recent times I have managed Scandi Noir without too much
problem. If the soundtrack is in a language I have some knowledge of
I end up playing spot the difference between the audio and text.
Sometimes bits are missed out or even rephrased.
Subtitles aren't nearly as annoying as when they fade the original
just enough to be audible behind dubbed speech, so you can almost
listen to the original but not quite. If they must dub it, I'd much
rather they muted the original altogether, but I'd rather they played
the original at an audible level and added subtitles.
I deeply dislike dubbed soundtracks. The acoustic is never right and the
acting of the voices never convincing. Worst of all was a series of
Montalbano where they dubbed the German actress playing Silvia - she
sounded as if she was reading the part in a different room entirely from
Salvo.
My comments were aimed at news and current affairs broadcasts rather
than drama. Either subtitle OR dub, but if you must dub, don't leave the
original audible.

Anne B

Mike Ruddock
2019-12-31 08:44:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kate B
Post by Kate B
Post by SODAM
Post by krw
Watched the first one but did not think there was enough to justify the
other two.
I thought the young actor playing the main part was very charismatic and
enjoyed his gritty partnership with the older detective. I also liked the
costumes and sets, which evoked the period very well.
Loved the costumes and sets (many of which were I suspect substantially
real and not studio sets, at least the outdoor ones - just imagine
clearing the spaces outside the Hofburg for filming!), quite liked the
characters, thought Clara a most admirable person and very hardly done
by, thought the psychological stuff really clumsily stuck on; but most
of all wondered why they didn't just film it in German. The actors,
nearly all of whom were Austrian, spoke English remarkably well but
would have seemed so much more natural if they had spoken Viennese.
We're all used to subtitles now, it would have surely been easier!
Just a small point Kate, not quite all of us are ‘used to subtitles’, to me
they make any non-English scripting totally useless as I cannot read
them:-((( . Many a detective series (for instance) is sadly rejected as I
cannot follow them.
Sorry, perhaps 'all' was a bit general. At home here we rely on
subtitles because the best beloved is profoundly deaf - we miss out on
too many old films and potentially great series on the streaming
channels because they don't have them.
Some streamed series have subtitles. We watch The Crown with subtitles.

Mike Ruddock
Vicky Ayech
2019-12-31 09:40:46 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 31 Dec 2019 08:44:27 +0000, Mike Ruddock
Post by Mike Ruddock
Post by Kate B
Post by Kate B
Post by SODAM
Post by krw
Watched the first one but did not think there was enough to justify the
other two.
I thought the young actor playing the main part was very charismatic and
enjoyed his gritty partnership with the older detective. I also liked the
costumes and sets, which evoked the period very well.
Loved the costumes and sets (many of which were I suspect substantially
real and not studio sets, at least the outdoor ones - just imagine
clearing the spaces outside the Hofburg for filming!), quite liked the
characters, thought Clara a most admirable person and very hardly done
by, thought the psychological stuff really clumsily stuck on; but most
of all wondered why they didn't just film it in German. The actors,
nearly all of whom were Austrian, spoke English remarkably well but
would have seemed so much more natural if they had spoken Viennese.
We're all used to subtitles now, it would have surely been easier!
Just a small point Kate, not quite all of us are ‘used to subtitles’,
to me
they make any non-English scripting totally useless as I cannot read
them:-((( . Many a detective series (for instance) is sadly rejected as I
cannot follow them.
Sorry, perhaps 'all' was a bit general. At home here we rely on
subtitles because the best beloved is profoundly deaf - we miss out on
too many old films and potentially great series on the streaming
channels because they don't have them.
Some streamed series have subtitles. We watch The Crown with subtitles.
Mike Ruddock
Yes we have them on but they are not needed as everyone speaks the
Queen's English, clearly.
Kate B
2019-12-31 10:20:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike Ruddock
Post by Kate B
Post by Kate B
Post by SODAM
Post by krw
Watched the first one but did not think there was enough to justify the
other two.
I thought the young actor playing the main part was very
charismatic and
enjoyed his gritty partnership with the older detective. I also liked the
costumes and sets, which evoked the period very well.
Loved the costumes and sets (many of which were I suspect substantially
real and not studio sets, at least the outdoor ones - just imagine
clearing the spaces outside the Hofburg for filming!), quite liked the
characters, thought Clara a most admirable person and very hardly done
by, thought the psychological stuff really clumsily stuck on; but most
of all wondered why they didn't just film it in German. The actors,
nearly all of whom were Austrian, spoke English remarkably well but
would have seemed so much more natural if they had spoken Viennese.
We're all used to subtitles now, it would have surely been easier!
Just a small point Kate, not quite all of us are ‘used to subtitles’, to me
they make any non-English scripting totally useless as I cannot read
them:-((( . Many a detective series (for instance) is sadly rejected as I
cannot follow them.
Sorry, perhaps 'all' was a bit general. At home here we rely on
subtitles because the best beloved is profoundly deaf - we miss out on
too many old films and potentially great series on the streaming
channels because they don't have them.
Some streamed series have subtitles. We watch The Crown with subtitles.
Yes, some do. We've enjoyed House of Cards, and Goliath, and The
Americans. But surprisingly many don't.
--
Kate B
London
Penny
2019-12-31 11:35:04 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 31 Dec 2019 10:20:33 +0000, Kate B <***@nospam.demon.co.uk>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Kate B
Post by Mike Ruddock
Some streamed series have subtitles. We watch The Crown with subtitles.
Yes, some do. We've enjoyed House of Cards, and Goliath, and The
Americans. But surprisingly many don't.
Long before streamed services I used subtitles when watching the X files.
The sound (and sometimes enunciation) is dreadful on American shows. I now
watch a lot of CBS reruns and sometimes run a scene several times and still
don't understand all that has been said. I wish they provided subs.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Penny
2019-12-31 09:00:22 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 30 Dec 2019 16:51:26 +0000, Kate B <***@nospam.demon.co.uk>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Kate B
Post by SODAM
Post by krw
Watched the first one but did not think there was enough to justify the
other two.
I thought the young actor playing the main part was very charismatic and
enjoyed his gritty partnership with the older detective. I also liked the
costumes and sets, which evoked the period very well.
Loved the costumes and sets (many of which were I suspect substantially
real and not studio sets, at least the outdoor ones - just imagine
clearing the spaces outside the Hofburg for filming!), quite liked the
characters, thought Clara a most admirable person and very hardly done
by, thought the psychological stuff really clumsily stuck on; but most
of all wondered why they didn't just film it in German. The actors,
nearly all of whom were Austrian, spoke English remarkably well but
would have seemed so much more natural if they had spoken Viennese.
We're all used to subtitles now, it would have surely been easier!
Maybe they filmed it twice, like Hinterland.

Talking to d#2 over the weekend, she had recently watched Hinterland on
Netflix where it was entirely in English. I understand they also made a
version entirely in Welsh. The one I saw on BBC Wales was in both depending
on the character speaking. I watched with English subtitles for the Welsh
dialogue, possibly Welsh ones were also available.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Kate B
2019-12-31 10:25:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Kate B
Post by SODAM
Post by krw
Watched the first one but did not think there was enough to justify the
other two.
I thought the young actor playing the main part was very charismatic and
enjoyed his gritty partnership with the older detective. I also liked the
costumes and sets, which evoked the period very well.
Loved the costumes and sets (many of which were I suspect substantially
real and not studio sets, at least the outdoor ones - just imagine
clearing the spaces outside the Hofburg for filming!), quite liked the
characters, thought Clara a most admirable person and very hardly done
by, thought the psychological stuff really clumsily stuck on; but most
of all wondered why they didn't just film it in German. The actors,
nearly all of whom were Austrian, spoke English remarkably well but
would have seemed so much more natural if they had spoken Viennese.
We're all used to subtitles now, it would have surely been easier!
Maybe they filmed it twice, like Hinterland.
Talking to d#2 over the weekend, she had recently watched Hinterland on
Netflix where it was entirely in English. I understand they also made a
version entirely in Welsh. The one I saw on BBC Wales was in both depending
on the character speaking. I watched with English subtitles for the Welsh
dialogue, possibly Welsh ones were also available.
We liked that too, and watched in on S4C which is available on Virgin. I
am all for people speaking their first language in such circumstances.

Did anyone watch Giri/Haji? We were entranced.
--
Kate B
London
krw
2019-12-31 10:39:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kate B
Did anyone watch Giri/Haji? We were entranced.
On the hard disk waiting to be watched.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
BrritSki
2019-12-31 11:46:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kate B
Did anyone watch Giri/Haji? We were entranced.
Yes and yes.
Very strange ending though, esp. the B&W scene on the roof.
Kate B
2019-12-31 11:51:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by BrritSki
Post by Kate B
Did anyone watch Giri/Haji? We were entranced.
Yes and yes.
Very strange ending though, esp. the B&W scene on the roof.
Indeed, but strangely and inexplicably satisfying. You just wanted them
all, even the gangsters, to be happy. The dance was incredibly beautiful.
--
Kate B
London
BrritSki
2019-12-31 11:52:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kate B
Post by BrritSki
Post by Kate B
Did anyone watch Giri/Haji? We were entranced.
Yes and yes.
Very strange ending though, esp. the B&W scene on the roof.
Indeed, but strangely and inexplicably satisfying. You just wanted them
all, even the gangsters, to be happy. The dance was incredibly beautiful.
Yes, it did fit in and we enjoyed it overall despite the high levels of
graphic violence :)
Jenny M Benson
2019-12-31 11:12:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kate B
Loved the costumes and sets (many of which were I suspect substantially
real and not studio sets, at least the outdoor ones - just imagine
clearing the spaces outside the Hofburg for filming!), quite liked the
characters, thought Clara a most admirable person and very hardly done
by, thought the psychological stuff really clumsily stuck on; but most
of all wondered why they didn't just film it in German. The actors,
nearly all of whom were Austrian, spoke English remarkably well but
would have seemed so much more natural if they had spoken Viennese.
We're all used to subtitles now, it would have surely been easier!
I wouldn't have watched if it had been "foreign speech" and subtitles.
I really can't be doing with that and don't watch anything subtitled.
Yes, I'm sure I do miss some really good stuff, but it would never be
good enough to overcome my aversion, I'm afraid.
--
Jenny M Benson
Wrexham, UK
Vicky Ayech
2019-12-31 21:46:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by SODAM
Post by krw
Watched the first one but did not think there was enough to justify the
other two.
I thought the young actor playing the main part was very charismatic and
enjoyed his gritty partnership with the older detective. I also liked the
costumes and sets, which evoked the period very well.
Ok I watched the first today. It was all very dark. The clothes, the
photography, no sunshine or light.Very depressing. The story was dark
and depressing too and of course he was Off The Case. Hero detectives
often are. I felt very opressed by the climate socially as my family
would have been there then and felt upset about the electric shock
treatments as my cousin was in and our of the Marsden and other places
and they used that on her.

She was very depressed and suicidal, but had a miserable life as had
Crohn's disease from the age of about 17 and treatment then was to
remove chunks of the bowel. And the shock treatment was painful; and
scary and unhelpful. It destroyed memory too.
Vicky Ayech
2019-12-31 21:46:59 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 31 Dec 2019 21:46:19 +0000, Vicky Ayech
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by SODAM
Post by krw
Watched the first one but did not think there was enough to justify the
other two.
I thought the young actor playing the main part was very charismatic and
enjoyed his gritty partnership with the older detective. I also liked the
costumes and sets, which evoked the period very well.
Ok I watched the first today. It was all very dark. The clothes, the
photography, no sunshine or light.Very depressing. The story was dark
and depressing too and of course he was Off The Case. Hero detectives
often are. I felt very opressed by the climate socially as my family
would have been there then and felt upset about the electric shock
treatments as my cousin was in and our of the Marsden and other places
and they used that on her.
She was very depressed and suicidal, but had a miserable life as had
Crohn's disease from the age of about 17 and treatment then was to
remove chunks of the bowel. And the shock treatment was painful; and
scary and unhelpful. It destroyed memory too.
I meant to add I don't think I'll watch the other two.
SODAM
2019-12-30 15:54:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
.
It says 3 part series so if you've seen several that is probably all
of them.
Thanks for the name, Vicky. Yes, I think I probably saw three. That’s
annoying, because to me it didn’t have any sense of completion. I’ll have
to watch the last episode more carefully and see if there are pointers that
I missed.

I enjoyed the Gavin and Stacey Christmas special, which finished on such a
cliffhanger, but have heard both Ruth Jones and James Corden say there
won’t be any further episodes. What a tease!
--
SODAM
The thinking umrat’s choice for editor
krw
2019-12-30 16:27:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by SODAM
I enjoyed the Gavin and Stacey Christmas special, which finished on such a
cliffhanger, but have heard both Ruth Jones and James Corden say there
won’t be any further episodes. What a tease!
As did I; however unless someone is actually going to explain the
fishing trip I am not at all sure there is much more to say.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Mike
2019-12-30 15:22:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by krw
For another series which is reeling me in please watch "World on Fire".
An Australian production?
BTN
Yes.
Ooh! I theng you very much! Possibly my last this year?
--
Toodle Pip
Sid Nuncius
2020-01-01 06:50:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by Mike
Post by krw
For another series which is reeling me in please watch "World on Fire".
An Australian production?
BTN
Yes.
Ooh! I theng you very much! Possibly my last this year?
As previously announced, nominations for the Awards to be announced at
the 2020 Ceremony (this coming Sunday) closed on 20th December. Yours
will be a candidate for a BTA at the 2021 Ceremony.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Mike
2020-01-01 08:52:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Mike
Post by Mike
Post by krw
For another series which is reeling me in please watch "World on Fire".
An Australian production?
BTN
Yes.
Ooh! I theng you very much! Possibly my last this year?
As previously announced, nominations for the Awards to be announced at
the 2020 Ceremony (this coming Sunday) closed on 20th December. Yours
will be a candidate for a BTA at the 2021 Ceremony.
But it was still my last contribution of 2019 as it turned out.
--
Toodle Pip
Vicky Ayech
2019-12-30 09:31:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by krw
World on Fire"
I saw it was on but there have been so many programmes about WW2 I
haven't wanted to see it. I quite enjoyed the one about the policeman
during the war...Umbrella. A series that ran for quite a while and
went on a bit after the war..his son was in the air force...his female
driver was his assistant..

Whoever mentioned ER though, thanks. I know there have been lots of
hospital series but I am enjoying this. Not much like Emergency Ward
10. Less ward.
Mike Ruddock
2019-12-30 09:40:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by krw
World on Fire"
I saw it was on but there have been so many programmes about WW2 I
haven't wanted to see it. I quite enjoyed the one about the policeman
during the war...Umbrella. A series that ran for quite a while and
went on a bit after the war..his son was in the air force...his female
driver was his assistant..
Whoever mentioned ER though, thanks. I know there have been lots of
hospital series but I am enjoying this. Not much like Emergency Ward
10. Less ward.
Foyles War?

Mike Ruddock
Vicky Ayech
2019-12-30 11:47:04 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 30 Dec 2019 09:40:33 +0000, Mike Ruddock
Post by Mike Ruddock
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by krw
World on Fire"
I saw it was on but there have been so many programmes about WW2 I
haven't wanted to see it. I quite enjoyed the one about the policeman
during the war...Umbrella. A series that ran for quite a while and
went on a bit after the war..his son was in the air force...his female
driver was his assistant..
Whoever mentioned ER though, thanks. I know there have been lots of
hospital series but I am enjoying this. Not much like Emergency Ward
10. Less ward.
Foyles War?
Mike Ruddock
Yes, thank you.
Mike
2019-12-30 09:41:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by krw
World on Fire"
I saw it was on but there have been so many programmes about WW2 I
haven't wanted to see it. I quite enjoyed the one about the policeman
during the war...Umbrella. A series that ran for quite a while and
went on a bit after the war..his son was in the air force...his female
driver was his assistant..
Whoever mentioned ER though, thanks. I know there have been lots of
hospital series but I am enjoying this. Not much like Emergency Ward
10. Less ward.
Foyle’s War?
--
Toodle Pip
krw
2020-01-03 14:58:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
We watched the Christmas Call the Midwife last night. I liked the calf
and thought it acted well. They ran out of the books a while back and
that was noticeable. They may have actually jumped the shark though
now. B thought Worst Episode Ever, but I am not quite sure.
I'm reading the books and there was a lot about the world inthe area
generally that was not covered in the programmes. It was very sad for
the most part and depressing.
Ok I am a GOW.
Last night we finished watching "War of the Worlds" an alleged
adaptation of a rather famous book.

I can advise that for some reason I lost my mind and three hours of my
life watching this absolute trash which almost completely forgot the
source material and devised a completely new story where although no-one
had anything somehow books could still get printed.

Under no circumstances should this ever be aired again. The lead actor
ended up dead which was just as well as he could not be bothered to
enunciate and for some reason Woking was being served by Great Western
trains.

I cannot understand how this was ever approved.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Mike
2020-01-03 15:53:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by krw
Post by Vicky Ayech
We watched the Christmas Call the Midwife last night. I liked the calf
and thought it acted well. They ran out of the books a while back and
that was noticeable. They may have actually jumped the shark though
now. B thought Worst Episode Ever, but I am not quite sure.
I'm reading the books and there was a lot about the world inthe area
generally that was not covered in the programmes. It was very sad for
the most part and depressing.
Ok I am a GOW.
Last night we finished watching "War of the Worlds" an alleged
adaptation of a rather famous book.
I can advise that for some reason I lost my mind and three hours of my
life watching this absolute trash which almost completely forgot the
source material and devised a completely new story where although no-one
had anything somehow books could still get printed.
Under no circumstances should this ever be aired again. The lead actor
ended up dead which was just as well as he could not be bothered to
enunciate and for some reason Woking was being served by Great Western
trains.
I cannot understand how this was ever approved.
Maybe it was the same rubbish as I wasted three hours disliking. Seemed to
be shot on very badly lit sets in a sort of colourised sepia tone a lot of
the time and bore very little relationship to a book with a similar title!
--
Toodle Pip
Penny
2020-01-03 19:35:37 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 3 Jan 2020 14:58:28 +0000, krw <***@whitnet.uk> scrawled in the
dust...
Post by krw
Last night we finished watching "War of the Worlds" an alleged
adaptation of a rather famous book.
I can advise that for some reason I lost my mind and three hours of my
life watching this absolute trash which almost completely forgot the
source material and devised a completely new story where although no-one
had anything somehow books could still get printed.
Under no circumstances should this ever be aired again. The lead actor
ended up dead which was just as well as he could not be bothered to
enunciate and for some reason Woking was being served by Great Western
trains.
I cannot understand how this was ever approved.
War of the Worlds it wasn't but I quite enjoyed it nonetheless - if only
for Umbrella, the Cornish mine-owner's missus (sorry, I'm all umbrellas at
the moment).

I didn't expect to enjoy Dracula (I've never read the book but have seen a
couple of adaptations).
I'm enjoying this new one and will certainly watch the final episode
tonight. The 'horror' is barely glimpsed (always the best way IMO). The
witty lines feel a bit out of place but there aren't too many of them.

S

P

O

I

L

E

R

A Count who has prepared himself for 19th century England may not find
himself well-suited to 21st century Whitby.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
steveski
2020-01-04 01:33:59 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 03 Jan 2020 19:35:37 +0000, Penny wrote:

[]
Post by Penny
S
P
O
I
L
E
R
A Count who has prepared himself for 19th century England may not find
himself well-suited to 21st century Whitby.
Had lunch at the Magpie recently - magnificent fish and chips. As good,
if not better, than the original Harry Ramsdens (I can never remember
whether it was Shipley or Bingley). Part of a North York Moors Railway
holiday. We stayed in Pickering.
--
Steveski
Nick Odell
2020-01-03 22:38:07 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 3 Jan 2020 14:58:28 +0000, krw <***@whitnet.uk> wrote:
<snip>
Post by krw
Under no circumstances should this ever be aired again. The lead actor
ended up dead which was just as well as he could not be bothered to
enunciate and for some reason Woking was being served by Great Western
trains.
I thought Woking was being served by Pizza Express.

Nick
krw
2020-01-03 22:56:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
<snip>
Post by krw
Under no circumstances should this ever be aired again. The lead actor
ended up dead which was just as well as he could not be bothered to
enunciate and for some reason Woking was being served by Great Western
trains.
I thought Woking was being served by Pizza Express.
Nick
Only on certain important days.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
steveski
2020-01-04 01:38:02 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 03 Jan 2020 22:38:07 +0000, Nick Odell wrote:

[]
Post by Nick Odell
I thought Woking was being served by Pizza Express.
Woking is "the feeling that you get when you've gone into the kitchen and
forgotten what it is you went in for".

My second favourite quote from 'The Meaning of Liff'.
--
Steveski
Sam Plusnet
2020-01-04 19:23:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by steveski
[]
Post by Nick Odell
I thought Woking was being served by Pizza Express.
Woking is "the feeling that you get when you've gone into the kitchen and
forgotten what it is you went in for".
My second favourite quote from 'The Meaning of Liff'.
Surely Woking is the attempt to inculcate an advanced sense of social
justice in those around you.
--
Sam Plusnet
Min
2020-01-04 00:25:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
We watched the Christmas Call the Midwife last night. I liked the calf
and thought it acted well. They ran out of the books a while back and
that was noticeable. They may have actually jumped the shark though
now. B thought Worst Episode Ever, but I am not quite sure.
I'm reading the books and there was a lot about the world inthe area
generally that was not covered in the programmes. It was very sad for
the most part and depressing.
Ok I am a GOW.
I was at a 20s-themed party on NYE and the host & hostess started talking
about the *series* Hamish Macbeth. Having read all the books, I was somewhat
puzzled to hear about his dog "Wee Jock". Anyway, finding that the series were
available on Amazon, I have been binge-watching. It's excellent, who would not
adore Robert Carlyle...but why call it Hamish Macbeth?! Why not call it 'A
Scottish policeman who might sort of remind you a bit of Hamish Macbeth'? Not
a very snappy title, but more honest. Carlola Dunn's 'Daisy Dalrymple' books
have as the blurb "For fans of Lord Peter Wimsey" simply because the protagonist
is an 'Hoourable' in the 20s. Anyway, I was deeply saddened, when trying to
find out what the author of 'Hamish Macbeth' thought of the series, to find out
she had passed at 83 on 30 December. RIP Marion Chesney, AKA M C Beaton.
--
Min
Min
2020-01-04 01:29:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Min
is an 'Hoourable' in the 20s. Anyway, I was deeply saddened, when trying to
find out what the author of 'Hamish Macbeth' thought of the series, to find out
she had passed at 83 on 30 December. RIP Marion Chesney, AKA M C Beaton.
--
Min
*Honourable*
steveski
2020-01-04 01:43:58 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 03 Jan 2020 16:25:53 -0800, Min wrote:

[]
Post by Min
I was at a 20s-themed party on NYE and the host & hostess started
talking about the *series* Hamish Macbeth. Having read all the books, I
was somewhat puzzled to hear about his dog "Wee Jock". Anyway, finding
that the series were available on Amazon, I have been binge-watching.
It's excellent, who would not adore Robert Carlyle...but why call it
Hamish Macbeth?! Why not call it 'A Scottish policeman who might sort
of remind you a bit of Hamish Macbeth'? Not a very snappy title, but
more honest. Carlola Dunn's 'Daisy Dalrymple' books have as the blurb
"For fans of Lord Peter Wimsey" simply because the protagonist is an
'Hoourable' in the 20s. Anyway, I was deeply saddened, when trying to
find out what the author of 'Hamish Macbeth' thought of the series, to
find out she had passed at 83 on 30 December. RIP Marion Chesney, AKA M
C Beaton.
In the TV series, there was no mention of 'Sonsie', whom I quite liked.

Also there was no mention, in the original books, of him smoking illicit
herbage. [1]
--
Steveski

[1] Not that I have the slightest objection to that :-)
Min
2020-01-05 00:26:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by steveski
[]
Post by Min
I was at a 20s-themed party on NYE and the host & hostess started
talking about the *series* Hamish Macbeth. Having read all the books, I
was somewhat puzzled to hear about his dog "Wee Jock". Anyway, finding
that the series were available on Amazon, I have been binge-watching.
It's excellent, who would not adore Robert Carlyle...but why call it
Hamish Macbeth?! Why not call it 'A Scottish policeman who might sort
of remind you a bit of Hamish Macbeth'? Not a very snappy title, but
more honest. Carlola Dunn's 'Daisy Dalrymple' books have as the blurb
"For fans of Lord Peter Wimsey" simply because the protagonist is an
'Hoourable' in the 20s. Anyway, I was deeply saddened, when trying to
find out what the author of 'Hamish Macbeth' thought of the series, to
find out she had passed at 83 on 30 December. RIP Marion Chesney, AKA M
C Beaton.
In the TV series, there was no mention of 'Sonsie', whom I quite liked.
Indeed, Steveski. I can see the problems of getting a wildcat to learn
lines and not trip over the furniture, but I was looking forward to Lugs....
Post by steveski
Also there was no mention, in the original books, of him smoking illicit
herbage. [1]
In the books, he was a reformed smoker, but still longed for one...I was
wondering whether Robert Carlyle was such a heavy smoker that he had to
have them written into his role...?
--
Min
Penny
2020-01-04 08:59:28 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 3 Jan 2020 16:25:53 -0800 (PST), Min <***@googlemail.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Min
I was at a 20s-themed party on NYE and the host & hostess started talking
about the *series* Hamish Macbeth. Having read all the books, I was somewhat
puzzled to hear about his dog "Wee Jock". Anyway, finding that the series were
available on Amazon, I have been binge-watching. It's excellent, who would not
adore Robert Carlyle...but why call it Hamish Macbeth?! Why not call it 'A
Scottish policeman who might sort of remind you a bit of Hamish Macbeth'? Not
a very snappy title, but more honest.
I've never read the books but enjoyed the series when first aired and
watched it all again when it turned up last year, probably on one of the
CBS channels or Pick.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
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