Discussion:
Schools reopening?
(too old to reply)
Penny
2020-05-11 19:57:10 UTC
Permalink
Since they've started talking about the reopening of schools, I've heard it
said that young children rarely suffer much from Covid-19 (though I think
we have heard of more than one dying from it). This is given as a factor in
the suggestion that the return to school should first be for Years 1 and 6.

Teachers are not happy about this - who can blame them? - given the virtual
impossibility of keeping a bunch of 6 year-olds physically distant from
each other, whether inside or out.

What I haven't heard mentioned by anyone is the problems which may be
associated with getting the children to and from school (there may be other
children in the family who are not yet allowed back to school) and the
possibility of the children who are attending school bringing the virus
home with them and infecting their parents. Who would look after them then?

Is this another example of government not thinking things through or not
asking the right people? Or have I missed something? Quite possible as my
absorbtion of 'news' has reduced in recent weeks.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Rosalind Mitchell
2020-05-11 20:15:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
Since they've started talking about the reopening of schools, I've heard it
said that young children rarely suffer much from Covid-19 (though I think
we have heard of more than one dying from it). This is given as a factor in
the suggestion that the return to school should first be for Years 1 and 6.
Teachers are not happy about this - who can blame them? - given the virtual
impossibility of keeping a bunch of 6 year-olds physically distant from
each other, whether inside or out.
What I haven't heard mentioned by anyone is the problems which may be
associated with getting the children to and from school (there may be other
children in the family who are not yet allowed back to school) and the
possibility of the children who are attending school bringing the virus
home with them and infecting their parents. Who would look after them then?
Is this another example of government not thinking things through or not
asking the right people? Or have I missed something? Quite possible as my
absorbtion of 'news' has reduced in recent weeks.
What tickles me is the hand-wringing in some quarters about the damage
done to the education of primary school pupils in losing two or three
months of school to a deadly epidemic. If it's that bad, what damage
might be caused by stealing a whole year from them to rectify an
administrative anomaly.

That's what happened to me, and to everybody else of around my age who
had an August birthday and lived in Cheshire at the time; the time being
the cold and snowy January of 1963 when I and the others were shifted up
a year so that Cheshire County Council could start its school year on 1
September like everybody else. Suddenly I went from being oldest in my
class, socially confident and academically thriving, to being out of
place and struggling. I don't think I fully recovered until about six
years later when I was taking the bulk of my O-levels. I have tried in
vain to find information on how others fared; there seems to be no
public record of the event. It wasn't a promotion on academic grounds;
there were several others in my cohort who were similarly shifted but I
was the only one shifted to the 11-plus-bound class.

I wonder if there might be somebody in academia or the media who could
help me pick up on investigating this long-buried scandal.

R
Vicky Ayech
2020-05-11 21:02:53 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 11 May 2020 21:15:24 +0100, Rosalind Mitchell
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
Post by Penny
Since they've started talking about the reopening of schools, I've heard it
said that young children rarely suffer much from Covid-19 (though I think
we have heard of more than one dying from it). This is given as a factor in
the suggestion that the return to school should first be for Years 1 and 6.
Teachers are not happy about this - who can blame them? - given the virtual
impossibility of keeping a bunch of 6 year-olds physically distant from
each other, whether inside or out.
What I haven't heard mentioned by anyone is the problems which may be
associated with getting the children to and from school (there may be other
children in the family who are not yet allowed back to school) and the
possibility of the children who are attending school bringing the virus
home with them and infecting their parents. Who would look after them then?
Is this another example of government not thinking things through or not
asking the right people? Or have I missed something? Quite possible as my
absorbtion of 'news' has reduced in recent weeks.
What tickles me is the hand-wringing in some quarters about the damage
done to the education of primary school pupils in losing two or three
months of school to a deadly epidemic. If it's that bad, what damage
might be caused by stealing a whole year from them to rectify an
administrative anomaly.
That's what happened to me, and to everybody else of around my age who
had an August birthday and lived in Cheshire at the time; the time being
the cold and snowy January of 1963 when I and the others were shifted up
a year so that Cheshire County Council could start its school year on 1
September like everybody else. Suddenly I went from being oldest in my
class, socially confident and academically thriving, to being out of
place and struggling. I don't think I fully recovered until about six
years later when I was taking the bulk of my O-levels. I have tried in
vain to find information on how others fared; there seems to be no
public record of the event. It wasn't a promotion on academic grounds;
there were several others in my cohort who were similarly shifted but I
was the only one shifted to the 11-plus-bound class.
I wonder if there might be somebody in academia or the media who could
help me pick up on investigating this long-buried scandal.
R
Well, my birthday is very early in September and second grandson's is
too. I was one of the oldest in my class but it didn't seem an
advantage for me. Obviously abilities in a class will vary wildly so
some younger ones are brighter. Older less so. Second grandson's
birthday is 2 days after mine (best birthday present ever!) and he
will be held back in nursery for a year longer than his friends.

Meanwhile my older daughter's birthday is July. She was the youngest
in her class and as she'd been induced I think was still younger
really. Maybe not quite ready when induced. She developed slowly
during the infants and was still catching up in the juniors.

Her younger sister's birthday was May and she was very tired when
beginning school. Both were half day until Christmas and second
daughter used to come home for lunch even from January and if she fell
asleep after eating I'd not take her back to school. Both were fine
by secondary school, and I suppose I was, and you did well too in the
end, didn't you?
Penny
2020-05-11 22:56:58 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 11 May 2020 22:02:53 +0100, Vicky Ayech <***@gmail.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Vicky Ayech
Well, my birthday is very early in September and second grandson's is
too. I was one of the oldest in my class but it didn't seem an
advantage for me. Obviously abilities in a class will vary wildly so
some younger ones are brighter. Older less so. Second grandson's
birthday is 2 days after mine (best birthday present ever!) and he
will be held back in nursery for a year longer than his friends.
School year cut-offs are never going to work well for everyone. If you
could only persuade the parents to consider this before conception...

Two of my nephews, brothers, were born 13 months apart, in August and
September. They were always very different in outlook and ability, the
older being something of a timid plodder, the younger, creative and
adventurous. I always thought they would have done well together in the
same school year but, because of the way these things work, they were two
school years apart.

The older had to do 4 years at University, the first spent bringing his
maths up to the necessary standard for the course. The younger got bored at
school and, after the trauma of his parents' divorce, dropped out and
wandered off to the south of France - I haven't seen him for years.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Mike
2020-05-12 07:53:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
Since they've started talking about the reopening of schools, I've heard it
said that young children rarely suffer much from Covid-19 (though I think
we have heard of more than one dying from it). This is given as a factor in
the suggestion that the return to school should first be for Years 1 and 6.
Teachers are not happy about this - who can blame them? - given the virtual
impossibility of keeping a bunch of 6 year-olds physically distant from
each other, whether inside or out.
What I haven't heard mentioned by anyone is the problems which may be
associated with getting the children to and from school (there may be other
children in the family who are not yet allowed back to school) and the
possibility of the children who are attending school bringing the virus
home with them and infecting their parents. Who would look after them then?
Is this another example of government not thinking things through or not
asking the right people? Or have I missed something? Quite possible as my
absorbtion of 'news' has reduced in recent weeks.
And ‘wot about the Teachers then?’
--
Toodle Pip
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