Discussion:
OT - ask EU: Tourmaline and/or magnets for medical purposes
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J. P. Gilliver (John)
2019-11-27 00:12:02 UTC
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Do anyrats know anything about Tourmaline/magnetic products for medical
purposes - or self-heating products?

My friend has asked me to get her some "Tourmaline socks" for Christmas.
I've ordered them as they'll make her happy, but I must say they seem to
be the worst sort of quack medical/pseudoscience, that presses all my
buttons (the bad ones). An example of the socks:
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Liamostee-Tourmaline-Magnetic-Self-Heating-Therapy/dp/B07PM777GP
The same sort of thing seems to be made into belts, neck braces, and so
on. Sold mainly as pain-relief, with a side order of "self-heating",
especially the socks. The products have tourmalines and magnets in them.
They have no battery or similar power source, so basic physics tells me
they don't _create_ heat ("FIR" - far infrared - or otherwise!). [The
only way I can think of for them to _generate_ heat would be if they are
radioactive, and anything that is radioactive would be dangerous -
especially if worn touching the skin! - at much lower levels than
required to be feelable as warm!] As far as I can tell, tourmaline
itself is just a boron silicate mineral, which when it contains assorted
other materials takes on various colours, and makes common gemstones (I
mean they're not expensive).
Reading some of the amazon customer reviews (for the back and belt
product), it seems they _do_ get warm (some say too hot!) _when worn_.
It seems they do this by stimulating blood flow - so the heat is not
coming from the product, but the wearer's own body heat; it also seems
that it's the magnets, not the tourmaline stones, that have the effect
(some of the reviews say as much). [There may be some benefit - despite
the snake-oil! - from _that_ effect; heat often does ease some pains.]
Wikipedia on Tourmaline makes no mention of either medical or
"self-heating" properties/uses; NICE is mute on the matter; the (US) FDA
seems to be too.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

I hate people who quote Shakespeare at you but are proud that they can't add
up. Stupid People. - Carol Vorderman (Radio Times, 1-7 March 2003)
Mike Ruddock
2019-11-27 08:22:22 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Do anyrats know anything about Tourmaline/magnetic products for medical
purposes - or self-heating products?
My friend has asked me to get her some "Tourmaline socks" for Christmas.
I've ordered them as they'll make her happy, but I must say they seem to
be the worst sort of quack medical/pseudoscience, that presses all my
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Liamostee-Tourmaline-Magnetic-Self-Heating-Therapy/dp/B07PM777GP
The same sort of thing seems to be made into belts, neck braces, and so
on. Sold mainly as pain-relief, with a side order of "self-heating",
especially the socks. The products have tourmalines and magnets in them.
They have no battery or similar power source, so basic physics tells me
they don't _create_ heat ("FIR" - far infrared - or otherwise!). [The
only way I can think of for them to _generate_ heat would be if they are
radioactive, and anything that is radioactive would be dangerous -
especially if worn touching the skin! - at much lower levels than
required to be feelable as warm!] As far as I can tell, tourmaline
itself is just a boron silicate mineral, which when it contains assorted
other materials takes on various colours, and makes common gemstones (I
mean they're not expensive).
Reading some of the amazon customer reviews (for the back and belt
product), it seems they _do_ get warm (some say too hot!) _when worn_.
It seems they do this by stimulating blood flow - so the heat is not
coming from the product, but the wearer's own body heat; it also seems
that it's the magnets, not the tourmaline stones, that have the effect
(some of the reviews say as much). [There may be some benefit - despite
the snake-oil! - from _that_ effect; heat often does ease some pains.]
Wikipedia on Tourmaline makes no mention of either medical or
"self-heating" properties/uses; NICE is mute on the matter; the (US) FDA
seems to be too.
All I know about tourmaline is that in the old days before polaroid was
invented tourmaline was always quoted when explaining the polarisation
of light. Not taht it is very good at that as it is commonly almost opaque.

Mike Ruddock
Clive Arthur
2019-11-27 10:01:53 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Do anyrats know anything about Tourmaline/magnetic products for medical
purposes - or self-heating products?
<snip>

Blood conducts electricity albeit imperfectly, it's salty. Moving a
conductor through a magnetic field will induce a current in the
conductor. A current flowing through an imperfect conductor will
generate heat. The energy to do this comes from the flow of blood - in
other words the blood flow will be impeded locally.

So strapping a magnet to your body will cause local heating and
diminished blood flow. To such a minute degree that there's no evidence
of any therapeutic effect.

But placebos can work very well, I always keep a few handy.

Cheers
--
Clive
Mike
2019-11-27 10:21:32 UTC
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Post by Clive Arthur
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Do anyrats know anything about Tourmaline/magnetic products for medical
purposes - or self-heating products?
<snip>
Blood conducts electricity albeit imperfectly, it's salty. Moving a
conductor through a magnetic field will induce a current in the
conductor. A current flowing through an imperfect conductor will
generate heat. The energy to do this comes from the flow of blood - in
other words the blood flow will be impeded locally.
So strapping a magnet to your body will cause local heating and
diminished blood flow. To such a minute degree that there's no evidence
of any therapeutic effect.
But placebos can work very well, I always keep a few handy.
Cheers
Always place bos in your medicine cabinet out of reach of children...
--
Toodle Pip
Clive Arthur
2019-11-27 10:44:35 UTC
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Post by Mike
Post by Clive Arthur
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Do anyrats know anything about Tourmaline/magnetic products for medical
purposes - or self-heating products?
<snip>
Blood conducts electricity albeit imperfectly, it's salty. Moving a
conductor through a magnetic field will induce a current in the
conductor. A current flowing through an imperfect conductor will
generate heat. The energy to do this comes from the flow of blood - in
other words the blood flow will be impeded locally.
So strapping a magnet to your body will cause local heating and
diminished blood flow. To such a minute degree that there's no evidence
of any therapeutic effect.
But placebos can work very well, I always keep a few handy.
Cheers
Always place bos in your medicine cabinet out of reach of children...
I always try to heed the medical advice, "Keep out of reach of children".

Cheers
--
Clive
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2019-11-27 14:05:26 UTC
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Post by Clive Arthur
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Do anyrats know anything about Tourmaline/magnetic products for
medical purposes - or self-heating products?
[]
Post by Clive Arthur
Blood conducts electricity albeit imperfectly, it's salty. Moving a
conductor through a magnetic field will induce a current in the
conductor. A current flowing through an imperfect conductor will
generate heat. The energy to do this comes from the flow of blood - in
other words the blood flow will be impeded locally.
So strapping a magnet to your body will cause local heating and
diminished blood flow. To such a minute degree that there's no
evidence of any therapeutic effect.
Interesting. Some of the _negative_ reviews on amazon of the back
belt/neck straps were that they got _too_ hot (several reviewers said
the skin went red; some thought it might have done more harm than just
leave a mark that went away a few minutes after removal). So I'm willing
to believe (modern magnets can be _very_ strong) that there can be some
genuine heating effect (possibly aided by the constricting effect of a
belt anyway), though not for any of the reasons claimed by the sellers.

In particular, nothing to do with the tourmalines! Only the magnets.
Post by Clive Arthur
But placebos can work very well, I always keep a few handy.
Cheers
(-:. Yes. Having told my friends the idea, and that it's Latin for "I
will please", the husband (who shares my scepticism - he's the one with
the back pain, which _nothing_ - conventional or quack - does much for,
except temporarily from prescribed morphine, or whisky) has named the
pills she takes (she takes daily assorted things made from plants etc.)
"please me" pills. Even she sometimes calls them that now, but she still
takes them (-:.

The effect _is_ pretty universal: I sometimes take ibuprofen for various
things, particularly toothache, but couldn't _swear_ that they are the
reason it abates after a little while. And when I'm tired before I want
to be, I have a coffee - but whether it's the caffeine in one spoonful
of instant (I don't like fancy coffee), or the spoonful of sugar, or
simply the act of getting out of my chair to make it!, that makes me
feel more awake, I don't know. (I _like_ a mug of something warm, sweet,
and milky anyway.)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Anybody who thinks there can be unlimited growth in a static, limited
environment, is either mad or an economist. - Sir David Attenborough, in
Radio Times 10-16 November 2012
Nick Leverton
2019-11-27 14:29:01 UTC
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Post by Clive Arthur
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Do anyrats know anything about Tourmaline/magnetic products for medical
purposes - or self-heating products?
<snip>
Blood conducts electricity albeit imperfectly, it's salty. Moving a
conductor through a magnetic field will induce a current in the
conductor. A current flowing through an imperfect conductor will
generate heat. The energy to do this comes from the flow of blood - in
other words the blood flow will be impeded locally.
So strapping a magnet to your body will cause local heating and
diminished blood flow. To such a minute degree that there's no evidence
of any therapeutic effect.
But placebos can work very well, I always keep a few handy.
The strange thing about the placebo effect is that it can sometimes
be real ... So can its unpleasant opposite, the nocebo effect.
Even stranger is that dearer looking placebos can be more effective than
cheaper ones. These are all validated psychological effects.

Whilst placebos may be medically ineffective on blind trials and have
no known mode of physical action, if someone gets comfort from such
things then I would be very cautious about scoffing, as the mind/body
interactions in how diseases make us feel are still not well understood.

Nick
--
"The Internet, a sort of ersatz counterfeit of real life"
-- Janet Street-Porter, BBC2, 19th March 1996
Clive Arthur
2019-11-27 15:30:28 UTC
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On 27/11/2019 14:29, Nick Leverton wrote:

<snipped>
Post by Nick Leverton
Even stranger is that dearer looking placebos can be more effective than
cheaper ones.
Nick
I don't see that as strange at all - as an analogy, if you spend £1000
on speaker cables, they /will/ sound better to you than cheap ones.
There's more to sound perception than air vibrations, and there's more
to pain perception than something else which I can't think of a name for.

Cheers
--
Clive
Nick Leverton
2019-11-27 16:12:03 UTC
Reply
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Post by Clive Arthur
<snipped>
Post by Nick Leverton
Even stranger is that dearer looking placebos can be more effective than
cheaper ones.
Nick
I don't see that as strange at all - as an analogy, if you spend £1000
on speaker cables, they /will/ sound better to you than cheap ones.
There's more to sound perception than air vibrations, and there's more
to pain perception than something else which I can't think of a name for.
Umbrella ? :)

Nick
--
"The Internet, a sort of ersatz counterfeit of real life"
-- Janet Street-Porter, BBC2, 19th March 1996
BrritSki
2019-11-27 16:42:06 UTC
Reply
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Post by Clive Arthur
<snipped>
Post by Nick Leverton
Even stranger is that dearer looking placebos can be more effective than
cheaper ones.
Nick
I don't see that as strange at all - as an analogy, if you spend £1000
on speaker cables, they /will/ sound better to you than cheap ones.
There's more to sound perception than air vibrations, and there's more
to pain perception than something else which I can't think of a name for.
You've got a nerve...
Penny
2019-11-27 16:49:41 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 27 Nov 2019 00:12:02 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Do anyrats know anything about Tourmaline/magnetic products for medical
purposes - or self-heating products?
My friend has asked me to get her some "Tourmaline socks" for Christmas.
I've ordered them as they'll make her happy, but I must say they seem to
be the worst sort of quack medical/pseudoscience, that presses all my
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Liamostee-Tourmaline-Magnetic-Self-Heating-Therapy/dp/B07PM777GP
The same sort of thing seems to be made into belts, neck braces, and so
on. Sold mainly as pain-relief, with a side order of "self-heating",
especially the socks. The products have tourmalines and magnets in them.
I've never come across anything containing tourmaline which claimed medical
benefits but have seen various thing with magnets in which did - I've tried
some of those.

I have worn a bangle with magnets all around it, used insoles with little
magnets and other 'bumps' (of the same flexible plastic material as the
rest of the insole) which were called 'reflexology' insoles. I can't say
whether they did me any good. I'm sure they did me no harm.

I have had reflexology sessions which certainly pleased me, possibly
because I liked the practitioner and enjoyed our chats. I think it upset
the reflexology practitioner when I was found to have gall stones and she
had not been aware of them first. I've used a version of it myself to
definite good effect (it can be done on hands as well as feet). No magnets
involved.

However, with this background and previously read suggestions that magnets
were useful if you have arthritis, I carried a fairly strong magnet in my
pocket for a while after I was told the pain in my leg was down to an
arthritic hip. I have no idea if it was helpful or not. I often forgot to
take it from that pocket to put it in the one I was wearing and didn't miss
it, as I miss my meds when I forget to take them.

As for heat - in my experience, if some part of my body hurts it tends to
give off heat all by itself, even when the hurt is not caused by infection.
Presumably blood does its repair thing* and sends in the troops which heat
the area up a bit. If magnets can increase that effect it may be a good
thing.

*I was reading about horseshoe crabs recently. Their blood, which is blue,
it highly active on the repair front and will enclose and exclude any
foreign matter, such as bacteria and viruses, so they can't hurt anything.
Consequently horseshoe crabs are harvested and used as blood donors before
being returned to the sea. The blood, or some part of it, is then used to
clean human blood for transfusions. Work is being done to synthesise the
factor in the crab blood which does this magic. Then the crabs can go back
to being used as fish bait instead.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Serena Blanchflower
2019-11-27 17:19:25 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
On Wed, 27 Nov 2019 00:12:02 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Do anyrats know anything about Tourmaline/magnetic products for medical
purposes - or self-heating products?
My friend has asked me to get her some "Tourmaline socks" for Christmas.
I've ordered them as they'll make her happy, but I must say they seem to
be the worst sort of quack medical/pseudoscience, that presses all my
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Liamostee-Tourmaline-Magnetic-Self-Heating-Therapy/dp/B07PM777GP
The same sort of thing seems to be made into belts, neck braces, and so
on. Sold mainly as pain-relief, with a side order of "self-heating",
especially the socks. The products have tourmalines and magnets in them.
I've never come across anything containing tourmaline which claimed medical
benefits but have seen various thing with magnets in which did - I've tried
some of those.
Some years ago, I thought my then cat was close to deciding she'd had
enough and that she would rather depart this life, after two trips to
the vet, in a week, for opiates to deal with the pain she was in from
arthritis. Having heard the idea that magnets could help with arthritic
pain and being ready to try almost anything for her, I got her a
magnetic collar to see if that would help.

When the collar arrived, Lucy was barely able to walk, just manage to
totter short distances. The following morning, I went out to the garden
to talk to my (then new) gardener; Lucy followed me outside, down two
short flights of steps. She then saw, and chased, a butterfly - even
managing the odd star jump, when she tried to catch it. After this, she
decided that, rather than going back up the steps towards the house, she
would climb the forsythia and go up that way, instead!

Clearly the placebo effect wasn't likely to be too relevant to how she
reacted to it and the difference in how much she could do was too great
for it to be likely that it was tweaking my perception of how much she
could do. When I told the gardener why I was looking so astounded, he
told me that his wife had fairly severe fibromyalgia and that she'd
found a magnetic bracelet made a huge difference.

A few weeks later, when I mentioned it to the vet, expecting her to
scoff, she said she'd known other cats who had reacted really well to them.
--
Best wishes, Serena
Every life should have nine cats. (Anon)
Vicky Ayech
2019-11-27 17:51:51 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 27 Nov 2019 17:19:25 +0000, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Penny
On Wed, 27 Nov 2019 00:12:02 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Do anyrats know anything about Tourmaline/magnetic products for medical
purposes - or self-heating products?
My friend has asked me to get her some "Tourmaline socks" for Christmas.
I've ordered them as they'll make her happy, but I must say they seem to
be the worst sort of quack medical/pseudoscience, that presses all my
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Liamostee-Tourmaline-Magnetic-Self-Heating-Therapy/dp/B07PM777GP
The same sort of thing seems to be made into belts, neck braces, and so
on. Sold mainly as pain-relief, with a side order of "self-heating",
especially the socks. The products have tourmalines and magnets in them.
I've never come across anything containing tourmaline which claimed medical
benefits but have seen various thing with magnets in which did - I've tried
some of those.
Some years ago, I thought my then cat was close to deciding she'd had
enough and that she would rather depart this life, after two trips to
the vet, in a week, for opiates to deal with the pain she was in from
arthritis. Having heard the idea that magnets could help with arthritic
pain and being ready to try almost anything for her, I got her a
magnetic collar to see if that would help.
When the collar arrived, Lucy was barely able to walk, just manage to
totter short distances. The following morning, I went out to the garden
to talk to my (then new) gardener; Lucy followed me outside, down two
short flights of steps. She then saw, and chased, a butterfly - even
managing the odd star jump, when she tried to catch it. After this, she
decided that, rather than going back up the steps towards the house, she
would climb the forsythia and go up that way, instead!
Clearly the placebo effect wasn't likely to be too relevant to how she
reacted to it and the difference in how much she could do was too great
for it to be likely that it was tweaking my perception of how much she
could do. When I told the gardener why I was looking so astounded, he
told me that his wife had fairly severe fibromyalgia and that she'd
found a magnetic bracelet made a huge difference.
A few weeks later, when I mentioned it to the vet, expecting her to
scoff, she said she'd known other cats who had reacted really well to them.
B, who has fibromyalgia, has three magnet bracelets. He's not sure
they help but I did borrow them to wear and thought they might help
arthritis a bit. My hands often hurt and my wrists and I never wear a
watch or bracelet unless going out when I need the watch, but these,
which are heavy, were ok.
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2019-11-27 23:15:29 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Wed, 27 Nov 2019 17:19:25 +0000, Serena Blanchflower
[]
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Penny
I've never come across anything containing tourmaline which claimed medical
benefits but have seen various thing with magnets in which did - I've tried
some of those.
[]
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by Serena Blanchflower
When the collar arrived, Lucy was barely able to walk, just manage to
totter short distances. The following morning, I went out to the garden
to talk to my (then new) gardener; Lucy followed me outside, down two
short flights of steps. She then saw, and chased, a butterfly - even
managing the odd star jump, when she tried to catch it. After this, she
decided that, rather than going back up the steps towards the house, she
would climb the forsythia and go up that way, instead!
Wow!
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Clearly the placebo effect wasn't likely to be too relevant to how she
reacted to it and the difference in how much she could do was too great
for it to be likely that it was tweaking my perception of how much she
could do. When I told the gardener why I was looking so astounded, he
told me that his wife had fairly severe fibromyalgia and that she'd
found a magnetic bracelet made a huge difference.
A few weeks later, when I mentioned it to the vet, expecting her to
scoff, she said she'd known other cats who had reacted really well to them.
Sounds fairly conclusive!
Post by Vicky Ayech
B, who has fibromyalgia, has three magnet bracelets. He's not sure
they help but I did borrow them to wear and thought they might help
arthritis a bit. My hands often hurt and my wrists and I never wear a
watch or bracelet unless going out when I need the watch, but these,
which are heavy, were ok.
Inconclusive, I suppose, but at least (as another post said) will do no
_harm_. Though as Penny says, to do with magnets rather than
tourmalines.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

The motto of the Royal Society is: 'Take nobody's word for it'. Scepticism has
value. - Brian Cox, RT 2015/3/14-20
Penny
2019-11-27 18:21:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 27 Nov 2019 17:19:25 +0000, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
When the collar arrived, Lucy was barely able to walk, just manage to
totter short distances. The following morning, I went out to the garden
to talk to my (then new) gardener; Lucy followed me outside, down two
short flights of steps. She then saw, and chased, a butterfly - even
managing the odd star jump, when she tried to catch it. After this, she
decided that, rather than going back up the steps towards the house, she
would climb the forsythia and go up that way, instead!
Clearly the placebo effect wasn't likely to be too relevant to how she
reacted to it and the difference in how much she could do was too great
for it to be likely that it was tweaking my perception of how much she
could do. When I told the gardener why I was looking so astounded, he
told me that his wife had fairly severe fibromyalgia and that she'd
found a magnetic bracelet made a huge difference.
A few weeks later, when I mentioned it to the vet, expecting her to
scoff, she said she'd known other cats who had reacted really well to them.
Wow!
<wanders off to figure out how to make a magnet collar>
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Serena Blanchflower
2019-11-27 19:44:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Wed, 27 Nov 2019 17:19:25 +0000, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
When the collar arrived, Lucy was barely able to walk, just manage to
totter short distances. The following morning, I went out to the garden
to talk to my (then new) gardener; Lucy followed me outside, down two
short flights of steps. She then saw, and chased, a butterfly - even
managing the odd star jump, when she tried to catch it. After this, she
decided that, rather than going back up the steps towards the house, she
would climb the forsythia and go up that way, instead!
Clearly the placebo effect wasn't likely to be too relevant to how she
reacted to it and the difference in how much she could do was too great
for it to be likely that it was tweaking my perception of how much she
could do. When I told the gardener why I was looking so astounded, he
told me that his wife had fairly severe fibromyalgia and that she'd
found a magnetic bracelet made a huge difference.
A few weeks later, when I mentioned it to the vet, expecting her to
scoff, she said she'd known other cats who had reacted really well to them.
Wow!
<wanders off to figure out how to make a magnet collar>
It was a standard cat collar, with a small magnet attached on the inside
of it.
--
Best wishes, Serena
Do not meddle in the affairs of dragons, because you are crunchy and
taste good with ketchup.
Penny
2019-11-27 19:49:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 27 Nov 2019 19:44:10 +0000, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Penny
Wow!
<wanders off to figure out how to make a magnet collar>
It was a standard cat collar, with a small magnet attached on the inside
of it.
Hm, I'm now wondering if wearing earphones/headphones can get rid of a
headache.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
John Ashby
2019-11-27 20:11:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
On Wed, 27 Nov 2019 19:44:10 +0000, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Penny
Wow!
<wanders off to figure out how to make a magnet collar>
It was a standard cat collar, with a small magnet attached on the inside
of it.
Hm, I'm now wondering if wearing earphones/headphones can get rid of a
headache.
Only if the volume is loud enough to blot out what he's saying.

john
Penny
2019-11-27 23:59:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 27 Nov 2019 20:11:32 +0000, John Ashby <***@yahoo.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by John Ashby
Post by Penny
On Wed, 27 Nov 2019 19:44:10 +0000, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Penny
Wow!
<wanders off to figure out how to make a magnet collar>
It was a standard cat collar, with a small magnet attached on the inside
of it.
Hm, I'm now wondering if wearing earphones/headphones can get rid of a
headache.
Only if the volume is loud enough to blot out what he's saying.
I tried it with an ear bud in one ear - so I could still hear the TV. The
earpiece was not connected to anything. The headache reduced a bit while I
was wearing it. Worth further exploration when I haven't already taken a
painkiller.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Min
2019-11-28 06:37:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Apropos tourmaline, it is a very beautiful stone. When I take up Jewellery and Silversmithing again (Impossible at the moment, as I fear dogs and hot silver would mix all too well, to the detriment of the former...) I have two lovely slices of watermelon tourmaline that I purchased in a little shop in Kabul....
Some of the rarer colours command very high prices, and, if the stuff in the socks is either Opaque black schorl or yellow tsilaisite, they have high magnetic susceptibilities due to high concentrations of iron and manganese respectively. It's a fascinating mineral altogether, so less of the common! ;-)
--
Min (who is up at this hour after an inordinately long spell in Casualty with a (thankfully) unbroken finger).
Mike
2019-11-28 08:22:29 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Min
Apropos tourmaline, it is a very beautiful stone. When I take up
Jewellery and Silversmithing again (Impossible at the moment, as I fear
dogs and hot silver would mix all too well, to the detriment of the
former...) I have two lovely slices of watermelon tourmaline that I
purchased in a little shop in Kabul....
Some of the rarer colours command very high prices, and, if the stuff in
the socks is either Opaque black schorl or yellow tsilaisite, they have
high magnetic susceptibilities due to high concentrations of iron and
manganese respectively. It's a fascinating mineral altogether, so less of the common! ;-)
Ooh Min! I hope your snipper riffle finger wasn’t involved in any way?
--
Toodle Pip
BrritSki
2019-11-28 08:45:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Min
Apropos tourmaline, it is a very beautiful stone. When I take up Jewellery and Silversmithing again (Impossible at the moment, as I fear dogs and hot silver would mix all too well, to the detriment of the former...) I have two lovely slices of watermelon tourmaline that I purchased in a little shop in Kabul....
Some of the rarer colours command very high prices, and, if the stuff in the socks is either Opaque black schorl or yellow tsilaisite,
Bless you !
SODAM
2019-11-28 12:43:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Min (who is up at this hour after an >inordinately long spell in Casualty
with a >(thankfully) unbroken finger).
Thank goodness it wasn’t your typing finger!
--
SODAM
The thinking umrat’s choice for editor
Min
2019-11-28 06:40:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Apropos tourmaline, it is a very beautiful stone. When I take up Jewellery
and Silversmithing again (Impossible at the moment, as I fear dogs and hot
silver would mix all too well, to the detriment of the former...) I have two
lovely slices of watermelon tourmaline that I purchased in a little shop in
Kabul....
Some of the rarer colours command very high prices, and, if the stuff in the
socks is either Opaque black schorl or yellow tsilaisite, they have high
magnetic susceptibilities due to high concentrations of iron and manganese
respectively. It's a fascinating mineral altogether, so less of the common!
;-)
--
Min (who is up at this hour after an inordinately long spell in Casualty
with a (thankfully) unbroken finger).
Penny
2019-11-28 09:54:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 27 Nov 2019 22:40:14 -0800 (PST), Min <***@googlemail.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Min
Min (who is up at this hour after an inordinately long spell in Casualty
with a (thankfully) unbroken finger).
Ouch!
Arnica ointment may help, when I used it on a possibly broken toe the pain
and swelling reduced rapidly.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Vicky Ayech
2019-11-28 09:56:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 27 Nov 2019 22:40:14 -0800 (PST), Min
Post by Min
Min (who is up at this hour after an inordinately long spell in Casualty
with a (thankfully) unbroken finger).
Not broken is good. Hope all is well soon.
Chris McMillan
2019-11-28 10:47:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
On Wed, 27 Nov 2019 22:40:14 -0800 (PST), Min
Post by Min
Min (who is up at this hour after an inordinately long spell in Casualty
with a (thankfully) unbroken finger).
Not broken is good. Hope all is well soon.
Get well soon, Min!

Sincerely Chris
Serena Blanchflower
2019-11-28 13:45:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Min
Min (who is up at this hour after an inordinately long spell in Casualty
with a (thankfully) unbroken finger).
Glad to hear it's unbroken and I hope it isn't too long before it's back
to being a fully functional finger.
--
Best wishes, Serena
If you are going through hell, keep going. (Winston Churchill)
Penny
2019-11-28 13:12:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 27 Nov 2019 23:59:11 +0000, Penny <***@labyrinth.freeuk.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by John Ashby
Post by Penny
Hm, I'm now wondering if wearing earphones/headphones can get rid of a
headache.
Only if the volume is loud enough to blot out what he's saying.
I tried it with an ear bud in one ear - so I could still hear the TV. The
earpiece was not connected to anything. The headache reduced a bit while I
was wearing it. Worth further exploration when I haven't already taken a
painkiller.
No painkiller this morning (did I mention I've had this headache for a
couple of weeks?) and I tried an in-the-ear-but-not-an-earbud type this
morning. Headache has definitely reduced (though not gone away completely)
and if I remove the earphone the pain creeps up a notch.

Pros of this type of earphone - they hardly impede my hearing at all.
Cons - if used in my left ear it seems to amplify my tinnitus, more likely
just isolating it a bit so it's easier to hear(imagine?).

Now I just need a way for the thing to stop falling out...
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Kate B
2019-11-28 14:20:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by John Ashby
Post by Penny
Hm, I'm now wondering if wearing earphones/headphones can get rid of a
headache.
Only if the volume is loud enough to blot out what he's saying.
I tried it with an ear bud in one ear - so I could still hear the TV. The
earpiece was not connected to anything. The headache reduced a bit while I
was wearing it. Worth further exploration when I haven't already taken a
painkiller.
No painkiller this morning (did I mention I've had this headache for a
couple of weeks?) and I tried an in-the-ear-but-not-an-earbud type this
morning. Headache has definitely reduced (though not gone away completely)
and if I remove the earphone the pain creeps up a notch.
Pros of this type of earphone - they hardly impede my hearing at all.
Cons - if used in my left ear it seems to amplify my tinnitus, more likely
just isolating it a bit so it's easier to hear(imagine?).
Now I just need a way for the thing to stop falling out...
Penny, do you know what causes the headache? If not, then I think you
ought to get advice, a headache that goes on for a couple of weeks could
be a bad thing. Or it could be your pillow (which it was in my case).
Best to find out.
--
Kate B
London
Mike
2019-11-28 16:13:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Kate B
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by John Ashby
Post by Penny
Hm, I'm now wondering if wearing earphones/headphones can get rid of a
headache.
Only if the volume is loud enough to blot out what he's saying.
I tried it with an ear bud in one ear - so I could still hear the TV. The
earpiece was not connected to anything. The headache reduced a bit while I
was wearing it. Worth further exploration when I haven't already taken a
painkiller.
No painkiller this morning (did I mention I've had this headache for a
couple of weeks?) and I tried an in-the-ear-but-not-an-earbud type this
morning. Headache has definitely reduced (though not gone away completely)
and if I remove the earphone the pain creeps up a notch.
Pros of this type of earphone - they hardly impede my hearing at all.
Cons - if used in my left ear it seems to amplify my tinnitus, more likely
just isolating it a bit so it's easier to hear(imagine?).
Now I just need a way for the thing to stop falling out...
Penny, do you know what causes the headache? If not, then I think you
ought to get advice, a headache that goes on for a couple of weeks could
be a bad thing. Or it could be your pillow (which it was in my case).
Best to find out.
Oh be fair Kate! It is hardly the done thing to blame your headache on
Penny’s pillow!;-)
--
Toodle Pip
Penny
2019-11-28 21:56:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 28 Nov 2019 14:20:52 +0000, Kate B <***@nospam.demon.co.uk>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Kate B
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by John Ashby
Post by Penny
Hm, I'm now wondering if wearing earphones/headphones can get rid of a
headache.
Only if the volume is loud enough to blot out what he's saying.
I tried it with an ear bud in one ear - so I could still hear the TV. The
earpiece was not connected to anything. The headache reduced a bit while I
was wearing it. Worth further exploration when I haven't already taken a
painkiller.
No painkiller this morning (did I mention I've had this headache for a
couple of weeks?) and I tried an in-the-ear-but-not-an-earbud type this
morning. Headache has definitely reduced (though not gone away completely)
and if I remove the earphone the pain creeps up a notch.
Pros of this type of earphone - they hardly impede my hearing at all.
Cons - if used in my left ear it seems to amplify my tinnitus, more likely
just isolating it a bit so it's easier to hear(imagine?).
Now I just need a way for the thing to stop falling out...
Penny, do you know what causes the headache? If not, then I think you
ought to get advice, a headache that goes on for a couple of weeks could
be a bad thing. Or it could be your pillow (which it was in my case).
Best to find out.
I'm pretty sure it's a combination of the seasonal low sun (though not
lately) and fumes from the boiler (still trying to get someone to
investigate for me, finding competent tradesmen here is tricky) both of
which are migraine triggers for me. I've had lots of migraines with aura as
well but not in the last few days.

I did have a weird effect in one eye yesterday morning and scurried off to
Specsavers to get that checked. I'm assured it's just a floater and my
retina is intact. It's a bit like being haunted by a fruit fly, everywhere
I look, there it is, whizzing around as I move my eye.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Kate B
2019-11-28 22:51:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Kate B
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by John Ashby
Post by Penny
Hm, I'm now wondering if wearing earphones/headphones can get rid of a
headache.
Only if the volume is loud enough to blot out what he's saying.
I tried it with an ear bud in one ear - so I could still hear the TV. The
earpiece was not connected to anything. The headache reduced a bit while I
was wearing it. Worth further exploration when I haven't already taken a
painkiller.
No painkiller this morning (did I mention I've had this headache for a
couple of weeks?) and I tried an in-the-ear-but-not-an-earbud type this
morning. Headache has definitely reduced (though not gone away completely)
and if I remove the earphone the pain creeps up a notch.
Pros of this type of earphone - they hardly impede my hearing at all.
Cons - if used in my left ear it seems to amplify my tinnitus, more likely
just isolating it a bit so it's easier to hear(imagine?).
Now I just need a way for the thing to stop falling out...
Penny, do you know what causes the headache? If not, then I think you
ought to get advice, a headache that goes on for a couple of weeks could
be a bad thing. Or it could be your pillow (which it was in my case).
Best to find out.
I'm pretty sure it's a combination of the seasonal low sun (though not
lately) and fumes from the boiler (still trying to get someone to
investigate for me, finding competent tradesmen here is tricky) both of
which are migraine triggers for me. I've had lots of migraines with aura as
well but not in the last few days.
I did have a weird effect in one eye yesterday morning and scurried off to
Specsavers to get that checked. I'm assured it's just a floater and my
retina is intact. It's a bit like being haunted by a fruit fly, everywhere
I look, there it is, whizzing around as I move my eye.
Fumes from the boiler sounds nasty. They can be truly poisonous. I hope
you find a boilerman soon. Do you have Checkatrade or one of those
trusted trader schemes? We have always had good luck with their
recommendations. As for your eyes, floaters are usually benign, if
annoying, but if one ever stays fixed then get it checked out as soon as
you can (a very present anxiety for me right now...)
--
Kate B
London
Tony Smith Gloucestershire
2019-11-28 23:45:56 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Penny, I once had floaters while at some German Christmas Market - maybe Augsburg - but they cleared away.
Penny
2019-11-29 08:58:03 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 28 Nov 2019 22:51:54 +0000, Kate B <***@nospam.demon.co.uk>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Kate B
As for your eyes, floaters are usually benign, if
annoying, but if one ever stays fixed then get it checked out as soon as
you can (a very present anxiety for me right now...)
I've never had one quite like this before, hanging around for days in the
same place. The optometrist said they can last for months but I'll probably
'tune it out' after a while.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Chris McMillan
2019-11-29 16:48:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Kate B
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Kate B
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by John Ashby
Post by Penny
Hm, I'm now wondering if wearing earphones/headphones can get rid of a
headache.
Only if the volume is loud enough to blot out what he's saying.
I tried it with an ear bud in one ear - so I could still hear the TV. The
earpiece was not connected to anything. The headache reduced a bit while I
was wearing it. Worth further exploration when I haven't already taken a
painkiller.
No painkiller this morning (did I mention I've had this headache for a
couple of weeks?) and I tried an in-the-ear-but-not-an-earbud type this
morning. Headache has definitely reduced (though not gone away completely)
and if I remove the earphone the pain creeps up a notch.
Pros of this type of earphone - they hardly impede my hearing at all.
Cons - if used in my left ear it seems to amplify my tinnitus, more likely
just isolating it a bit so it's easier to hear(imagine?).
Now I just need a way for the thing to stop falling out...
Penny, do you know what causes the headache? If not, then I think you
ought to get advice, a headache that goes on for a couple of weeks could
be a bad thing. Or it could be your pillow (which it was in my case).
Best to find out.
I'm pretty sure it's a combination of the seasonal low sun (though not
lately) and fumes from the boiler (still trying to get someone to
investigate for me, finding competent tradesmen here is tricky) both of
which are migraine triggers for me. I've had lots of migraines with aura as
well but not in the last few days.
I did have a weird effect in one eye yesterday morning and scurried off to
Specsavers to get that checked. I'm assured it's just a floater and my
retina is intact. It's a bit like being haunted by a fruit fly, everywhere
I look, there it is, whizzing around as I move my eye.
Fumes from the boiler sounds nasty. They can be truly poisonous. I hope
you find a boilerman soon. Do you have Checkatrade or one of those
trusted trader schemes? We have always had good luck with their
recommendations. As for your eyes, floaters are usually benign, if
annoying, but if one ever stays fixed then get it checked out as soon as
you can (a very present anxiety for me right now...)
See wot I wrote to Penny, Kate. Very scary indeed!

Sincerely Chris
Mike
2019-11-29 15:07:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Kate B
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by John Ashby
Post by Penny
Hm, I'm now wondering if wearing earphones/headphones can get rid of a
headache.
Only if the volume is loud enough to blot out what he's saying.
I tried it with an ear bud in one ear - so I could still hear the TV. The
earpiece was not connected to anything. The headache reduced a bit while I
was wearing it. Worth further exploration when I haven't already taken a
painkiller.
No painkiller this morning (did I mention I've had this headache for a
couple of weeks?) and I tried an in-the-ear-but-not-an-earbud type this
morning. Headache has definitely reduced (though not gone away completely)
and if I remove the earphone the pain creeps up a notch.
Pros of this type of earphone - they hardly impede my hearing at all.
Cons - if used in my left ear it seems to amplify my tinnitus, more likely
just isolating it a bit so it's easier to hear(imagine?).
Now I just need a way for the thing to stop falling out...
Penny, do you know what causes the headache? If not, then I think you
ought to get advice, a headache that goes on for a couple of weeks could
be a bad thing. Or it could be your pillow (which it was in my case).
Best to find out.
I'm pretty sure it's a combination of the seasonal low sun (though not
lately) and fumes from the boiler (still trying to get someone to
investigate for me, finding competent tradesmen here is tricky) both of
which are migraine triggers for me. I've had lots of migraines with aura as
well but not in the last few days.
I did have a weird effect in one eye yesterday morning and scurried off to
Specsavers to get that checked. I'm assured it's just a floater and my
retina is intact. It's a bit like being haunted by a fruit fly, everywhere
I look, there it is, whizzing around as I move my eye.
Just for your information Penny, an important indicator of retinal
detaching getting started is the seeing of flashing and pin pricks of
light. If this happens, hot foot it to A&E or your local eye dept. Lie back
if you are able as this helps to keep the retina ‘flat’ and do not exert
yourself.
--
Toodle Pip
Penny
2019-11-29 16:34:50 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Fri, 29 Nov 2019 15:07:09 GMT, Mike <***@ntlworld.com> scrawled
in the dust...
Post by Mike
Just for your information Penny, an important indicator of retinal
detaching getting started is the seeing of flashing and pin pricks of
light.
The optometrist mentioned this and I had actually noticed a couple of very
small bright spots but he had a jolly good look and assured me my retina
was intact
Post by Mike
If this happens, hot foot it to A&E or your local eye dept. Lie back
if you are able as this helps to keep the retina ‘flat’ and do not exert
yourself.
Easy for you to say. The nearest A&E is a 45 minute* drive away.

As it was I drove from college, via Lidl where I bought a few things, to
Specsavers in the town centre. They made me an emergency appointment for 45
minutes time, asked if I'd like to wait or come back in half an hour for
the drops and asked if I'd driven there because it would be unwise to drive
after I'd had the drops.

I drove home, put shopping away, made a quick sandwich and walked back into
town, arriving very puffed out. Had one drop put in one eye and sat and ate
my lunch and read a book until called in for the examination.

I reckon I could see well enough to drive home, there was just a sort of
soft-focus effect around the edges in my right eye but do understand why I
was told not to.

Goodness knows how long it would have taken to get to A&E if not allowed to
drive myself. I believe the X75 bus stops there, it runs every 2 hours,
last bus back around 6pm.


* as reckoned by a local ambulance driver, I've known it take an hour and a
half.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Mike
2019-11-29 16:44:13 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
in the dust...
Post by Mike
Just for your information Penny, an important indicator of retinal
detaching getting started is the seeing of flashing and pin pricks of
light.
The optometrist mentioned this and I had actually noticed a couple of very
small bright spots but he had a jolly good look and assured me my retina
was intact
Post by Mike
If this happens, hot foot it to A&E or your local eye dept. Lie back
if you are able as this helps to keep the retina ‘flat’ and do not exert
yourself.
Easy for you to say. The nearest A&E is a 45 minute* drive away.
As it was I drove from college, via Lidl where I bought a few things, to
Specsavers in the town centre. They made me an emergency appointment for 45
minutes time, asked if I'd like to wait or come back in half an hour for
the drops and asked if I'd driven there because it would be unwise to drive
after I'd had the drops.
I drove home, put shopping away, made a quick sandwich and walked back into
town, arriving very puffed out. Had one drop put in one eye and sat and ate
my lunch and read a book until called in for the examination.
I reckon I could see well enough to drive home, there was just a sort of
soft-focus effect around the edges in my right eye but do understand why I
was told not to.
Goodness knows how long it would have taken to get to A&E if not allowed to
drive myself. I believe the X75 bus stops there, it runs every 2 hours,
last bus back around 6pm.
* as reckoned by a local ambulance driver, I've known it take an hour and a
half.
But the ambulance driver has the advantage of ‘blues and twos’ over your
own vehicle;-)
--
Toodle Pip
Penny
2019-11-29 18:50:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Fri, 29 Nov 2019 16:44:13 GMT, Mike <***@ntlworld.com> scrawled
in the dust...
Post by Mike
Post by Penny
in the dust...
Goodness knows how long it would have taken to get to A&E if not allowed to
drive myself. I believe the X75 bus stops there, it runs every 2 hours,
last bus back around 6pm.
* as reckoned by a local ambulance driver, I've known it take an hour and a
half.
But the ambulance driver has the advantage of ‘blues and twos’ over your
own vehicle;-)
That doesn't help much if the hold-up is down to floods, a major accident,
or tractors/livestock-trailers/timber-trailers or multiple caravans on the
narrow diversion routes.

I stopped once to let a fire-engine with blues and twos on out of a side
road before following it back to my town. It switched off the blues and
twos as soon as it was on the main road and didn't seem to be in a great
hurry. I figured it was on its way back to the fire station and the end of
the shift, or a meal, was imminent.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Mike
2019-11-29 19:08:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
in the dust...
Post by Mike
Post by Penny
in the dust...
Goodness knows how long it would have taken to get to A&E if not allowed to
drive myself. I believe the X75 bus stops there, it runs every 2 hours,
last bus back around 6pm.
* as reckoned by a local ambulance driver, I've known it take an hour and a
half.
But the ambulance driver has the advantage of ‘blues and twos’ over your
own vehicle;-)
That doesn't help much if the hold-up is down to floods, a major accident,
or tractors/livestock-trailers/timber-trailers or multiple caravans on the
narrow diversion routes.
I stopped once to let a fire-engine with blues and twos on out of a side
road before following it back to my town. It switched off the blues and
twos as soon as it was on the main road and didn't seem to be in a great
hurry. I figured it was on its way back to the fire station and the end of
the shift, or a meal, was imminent.
Years back, I was being transferred from The Royal Berkshire Hospital to
Moorfields in Lunnun; all happened on a day of a transport strike and chaos
in Lunnun. On the outskirts of the city, we were struggling along at 0.01
mph when a police car appeared and offered to ‘blues and twos’ us to our
destination. There I was sitting up in the ambulance watching car after car
pulling up on to the kerb to allow us to speed our escorted way to
horsepiddal!
--
Toodle Pip
Chris McMillan
2019-11-29 16:42:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Kate B
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by John Ashby
Post by Penny
Hm, I'm now wondering if wearing earphones/headphones can get rid of a
headache.
Only if the volume is loud enough to blot out what he's saying.
I tried it with an ear bud in one ear - so I could still hear the TV. The
earpiece was not connected to anything. The headache reduced a bit while I
was wearing it. Worth further exploration when I haven't already taken a
painkiller.
No painkiller this morning (did I mention I've had this headache for a
couple of weeks?) and I tried an in-the-ear-but-not-an-earbud type this
morning. Headache has definitely reduced (though not gone away completely)
and if I remove the earphone the pain creeps up a notch.
Pros of this type of earphone - they hardly impede my hearing at all.
Cons - if used in my left ear it seems to amplify my tinnitus, more likely
just isolating it a bit so it's easier to hear(imagine?).
Now I just need a way for the thing to stop falling out...
Penny, do you know what causes the headache? If not, then I think you
ought to get advice, a headache that goes on for a couple of weeks could
be a bad thing. Or it could be your pillow (which it was in my case).
Best to find out.
I'm pretty sure it's a combination of the seasonal low sun (though not
lately) and fumes from the boiler (still trying to get someone to
investigate for me, finding competent tradesmen here is tricky) both of
which are migraine triggers for me. I've had lots of migraines with aura as
well but not in the last few days.
I did have a weird effect in one eye yesterday morning and scurried off to
Specsavers to get that checked. I'm assured it's just a floater and my
retina is intact. It's a bit like being haunted by a fruit fly, everywhere
I look, there it is, whizzing around as I move my eye.
Ask them about the state of your vitreous. If you haven’t, I’ll fill you
in.

Sincerely Chris
Chris J Dixon
2019-11-29 18:46:45 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Ask them about the state of your vitreous. If you haven’t, I’ll fill you
in.
I thought for a moment this was an attempt at humour. ;-)

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk @ChrisJDixon1
Plant amazing Acers.
John Ashby
2019-11-29 18:47:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by Chris McMillan
Ask them about the state of your vitreous. If you haven’t, I’ll fill you
in.
I thought for a moment this was an attempt at humour. ;-)
Chris
Or a threat.

john
Chris McMillan
2019-12-01 12:23:56 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chris J Dixon
Ask them about the state of your vitreous. If you haven’t, I’ll fill you
in.
I thought for a moment this was an attempt at humour. ;-)
Chris
I’m not surprised. I thought about writing it in full but you’d have still
got me!

Sincerely Chris
Penny
2019-11-29 18:57:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Fri, 29 Nov 2019 16:42:33 GMT, Chris McMillan
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Penny
I did have a weird effect in one eye yesterday morning and scurried off to
Specsavers to get that checked. I'm assured it's just a floater and my
retina is intact. It's a bit like being haunted by a fruit fly, everywhere
I look, there it is, whizzing around as I move my eye.
Ask them about the state of your vitreous. If you haven’t, I’ll fill you
in.
He said what I was seeing was a floater in the vitreous humour. I think the
French term 'mouches volantes' describes what I'm seeing very well.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Kate B
2019-11-29 22:58:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
On Fri, 29 Nov 2019 16:42:33 GMT, Chris McMillan
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Penny
I did have a weird effect in one eye yesterday morning and scurried off to
Specsavers to get that checked. I'm assured it's just a floater and my
retina is intact. It's a bit like being haunted by a fruit fly, everywhere
I look, there it is, whizzing around as I move my eye.
Ask them about the state of your vitreous. If you haven’t, I’ll fill you
in.
He said what I was seeing was a floater in the vitreous humour. I think the
French term 'mouches volantes' describes what I'm seeing very well.
When one has reached - ahem - a certain distinguished period of one's
life, the vitreous humour, which is a kind of gel, may get a bit gellier
and can detach itself from areas of the retina. This causes lots of
flashing lights round the edges of your sight for a while but is not
actually dangerous like a retina detaching. I have had this, and loads
of floaters since forever. As eye problems go, these are relatively benign.
--
Kate B
London
Chris McMillan
2019-12-01 12:23:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
On Fri, 29 Nov 2019 16:42:33 GMT, Chris McMillan
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Penny
I did have a weird effect in one eye yesterday morning and scurried off to
Specsavers to get that checked. I'm assured it's just a floater and my
retina is intact. It's a bit like being haunted by a fruit fly, everywhere
I look, there it is, whizzing around as I move my eye.
Ask them about the state of your vitreous. If you haven’t, I’ll fill you
in.
He said what I was seeing was a floater in the vitreous humour. I think the
French term 'mouches volantes' describes what I'm seeing very well.
Do you know if your vitreous humour has detached yet? At our age its a
natural sign of ageing and is usually not known about till the optician
tells you. Both mine have pulled on blood vessels but no one knows why it
seems.

The side effects are so similar to a retinal detachment.

Sincerely Chris
Mike
2019-12-01 12:35:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Penny
On Fri, 29 Nov 2019 16:42:33 GMT, Chris McMillan
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Penny
I did have a weird effect in one eye yesterday morning and scurried off to
Specsavers to get that checked. I'm assured it's just a floater and my
retina is intact. It's a bit like being haunted by a fruit fly, everywhere
I look, there it is, whizzing around as I move my eye.
Ask them about the state of your vitreous. If you haven’t, I’ll fill you
in.
He said what I was seeing was a floater in the vitreous humour. I think the
French term 'mouches volantes' describes what I'm seeing very well.
Do you know if your vitreous humour has detached yet? At our age its a
natural sign of ageing and is usually not known about till the optician
tells you. Both mine have pulled on blood vessels but no one knows why it
seems.
The side effects are so similar to a retinal detachment.
Sincerely Chris
How progress marcheth onward: I had my second lot of surgery on my right
eye for retinal detachment only months after the first attempt had failed
in 1979. I didn’t learn until later that this was pioneering a new surgical
technique and I was only the second person to undergo the technique - the
first patient’s op. failed apparently so I was the first success; slides of
my eye surgery formed the basis of a lecture tour of the USA at the time.
The technique? Oh don’t worry about that - it is ‘out of date’ now!
--
Toodle Pip
Penny
2019-12-01 17:41:56 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sun, 01 Dec 2019 12:23:57 GMT, Chris McMillan
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Penny
On Fri, 29 Nov 2019 16:42:33 GMT, Chris McMillan
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Penny
I did have a weird effect in one eye yesterday morning and scurried off to
Specsavers to get that checked. I'm assured it's just a floater and my
retina is intact. It's a bit like being haunted by a fruit fly, everywhere
I look, there it is, whizzing around as I move my eye.
Ask them about the state of your vitreous. If you haven’t, I’ll fill you
in.
He said what I was seeing was a floater in the vitreous humour. I think the
French term 'mouches volantes' describes what I'm seeing very well.
Do you know if your vitreous humour has detached yet? At our age its a
natural sign of ageing and is usually not known about till the optician
tells you. Both mine have pulled on blood vessels but no one knows why it
seems.
Erme, I thought he said it was a piece of detritus in the vitreous humour,
presumably a bit of it which had detached itself from the rest. He asked
about blood in the eye but I haven't had red eyes lately.

I'm getting used to it a bit, that fly has stopped making me jump and flick
at my face.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
BrritSki
2019-11-28 14:22:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
No painkiller this morning (did I mention I've had this headache for a
couple of weeks?) and I tried an in-the-ear-but-not-an-earbud type this
morning. Headache has definitely reduced (though not gone away completely)
and if I remove the earphone the pain creeps up a notch.
Pros of this type of earphone - they hardly impede my hearing at all.
Cons - if used in my left ear it seems to amplify my tinnitus, more likely
just isolating it a bit so it's easier to hear(imagine?).
Now I just need a way for the thing to stop falling out...
Auditory duct tape. HTH HAND ;)
John Ashby
2019-11-28 16:16:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by John Ashby
Post by Penny
Hm, I'm now wondering if wearing earphones/headphones can get rid of a
headache.
Only if the volume is loud enough to blot out what he's saying.
I tried it with an ear bud in one ear - so I could still hear the TV. The
earpiece was not connected to anything. The headache reduced a bit while I
was wearing it. Worth further exploration when I haven't already taken a
painkiller.
No painkiller this morning (did I mention I've had this headache for a
couple of weeks?) and I tried an in-the-ear-but-not-an-earbud type this
morning. Headache has definitely reduced (though not gone away completely)
and if I remove the earphone the pain creeps up a notch.
Pros of this type of earphone - they hardly impede my hearing at all.
Cons - if used in my left ear it seems to amplify my tinnitus, more likely
just isolating it a bit so it's easier to hear(imagine?).
Now I just need a way for the thing to stop falling out...
Loop the wire over the pinna rather than leaving it to dangle with its
weight pulling the earpiece out.

john
Sjouke Burry
2019-11-27 22:26:03 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
On Wed, 27 Nov 2019 19:44:10 +0000, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Penny
Wow!
<wanders off to figure out how to make a magnet collar>
It was a standard cat collar, with a small magnet attached on the inside
of it.
Hm, I'm now wondering if wearing earphones/headphones can get rid of a
headache.
Yes.If you dont connect them to an audio source,,,,,,
Mike
2019-11-28 08:18:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sjouke Burry
Post by Penny
On Wed, 27 Nov 2019 19:44:10 +0000, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Penny
Wow!
<wanders off to figure out how to make a magnet collar>
It was a standard cat collar, with a small magnet attached on the inside
of it.
Hm, I'm now wondering if wearing earphones/headphones can get rid of a
headache.
Yes.If you dont connect them to an audio source,,,,,,
Hello Sjouke , are you new to these parts, if so, welcome!
--
Toodle Pip
Sjouke Burry
2019-11-28 17:56:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by Sjouke Burry
Post by Penny
On Wed, 27 Nov 2019 19:44:10 +0000, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Penny
Wow!
<wanders off to figure out how to make a magnet collar>
It was a standard cat collar, with a small magnet attached on the inside
of it.
Hm, I'm now wondering if wearing earphones/headphones can get rid of a
headache.
Yes.If you dont connect them to an audio source,,,,,,
Hello Sjouke , are you new to these parts, if so, welcome!
Lurking for a few months now. :)
Serena Blanchflower
2019-11-28 18:36:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sjouke Burry
Post by Mike
Post by Sjouke Burry
Post by Penny
On Wed, 27 Nov 2019 19:44:10 +0000, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Penny
Wow!
<wanders off to figure out how to make a magnet collar>
It was a standard cat collar, with a small magnet attached on the inside
of it.
Hm, I'm now wondering if wearing earphones/headphones can get rid of a
headache.
Yes.If you dont connect them to an audio source,,,,,,
Hello Sjouke , are you new to these parts, if so, welcome!
Lurking for a few months now. :)
Glad you decided to delurk and welcome to umra :)
--
Best wishes, Serena
I have the body of an eighteen year old. I keep it in the fridge. (Spike
Milligan)
Sid Nuncius
2019-11-28 18:54:45 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Sjouke Burry
Post by Mike
Hello Sjouke , are you new to these parts, if so, welcome!
Lurking for a few months now. :)
Glad you decided to delurk and welcome to umra :)
Indeed - and there's no going back now...
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Chris McMillan
2019-11-28 19:17:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Sjouke Burry
Post by Mike
Post by Sjouke Burry
Post by Penny
On Wed, 27 Nov 2019 19:44:10 +0000, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Penny
Wow!
<wanders off to figure out how to make a magnet collar>
It was a standard cat collar, with a small magnet attached on the inside
of it.
Hm, I'm now wondering if wearing earphones/headphones can get rid of a
headache.
Yes.If you dont connect them to an audio source,,,,,,
Hello Sjouke , are you new to these parts, if so, welcome!
Lurking for a few months now. :)
Glad you decided to delurk and welcome to umra :)
Welcome Sjouke!

Sincerely Chris
Vicky Ayech
2019-11-28 18:59:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 28 Nov 2019 18:56:26 +0100, Sjouke Burry
Post by Sjouke Burry
Post by Mike
Post by Sjouke Burry
Post by Penny
On Wed, 27 Nov 2019 19:44:10 +0000, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Penny
Wow!
<wanders off to figure out how to make a magnet collar>
It was a standard cat collar, with a small magnet attached on the inside
of it.
Hm, I'm now wondering if wearing earphones/headphones can get rid of a
headache.
Yes.If you dont connect them to an audio source,,,,,,
Hello Sjouke , are you new to these parts, if so, welcome!
Lurking for a few months now. :)
Welcome. You made a fine entrance :)
SODAM
2019-11-28 19:40:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sjouke Burry
Post by Mike
Hello Sjouke , are you new to these parts, if so, welcome!
Lurking for a few months now. :)
Hurrah! That rare thing, a new umrat.

Come in, sit down and have a virtual cup of tea.

Which Archers character do you like 1) best 2) least 3) you don’t listen ?
Hint: there are no wrong answers.
--
SODAM
The thinking umrat’s choice for editor
Chris McMillan
2019-11-29 16:32:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by SODAM
Post by Sjouke Burry
Post by Mike
Hello Sjouke , are you new to these parts, if so, welcome!
Lurking for a few months now. :)
Hurrah! That rare thing, a new umrat.
Come in, sit down and have a virtual cup of tea.
Which Archers character do you like 1) best 2) least 3) you don’t listen ?
Hint: there are no wrong answers.
Or are you a choccie addict?

Sincerely Chris
Penny
2019-11-28 21:57:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 28 Nov 2019 18:56:26 +0100, Sjouke Burry
Post by Sjouke Burry
Post by Mike
Post by Sjouke Burry
Post by Penny
On Wed, 27 Nov 2019 19:44:10 +0000, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Penny
Wow!
<wanders off to figure out how to make a magnet collar>
It was a standard cat collar, with a small magnet attached on the inside
of it.
Hm, I'm now wondering if wearing earphones/headphones can get rid of a
headache.
Yes.If you dont connect them to an audio source,,,,,,
Hello Sjouke , are you new to these parts, if so, welcome!
Lurking for a few months now. :)
Great delurk - welcome :)
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
BrritSki
2019-11-28 08:44:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sjouke Burry
Post by Penny
On Wed, 27 Nov 2019 19:44:10 +0000, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Penny
Wow!
<wanders off to figure out how to make a magnet collar>
It was a standard cat collar, with a small magnet attached on the inside
of it.
Hm, I'm now wondering if wearing earphones/headphones can get rid of a
headache.
Yes.If you dont connect them to an audio source,,,,,,
I heard that. Pardon ?

PS Welcome if you're new, rather than an umrat in a new coat...
Sam Plusnet
2019-11-28 19:52:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by BrritSki
Post by Sjouke Burry
Post by Penny
On Wed, 27 Nov 2019 19:44:10 +0000, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Penny
Wow!
<wanders off to figure out how to make a magnet collar>
It was a standard cat collar, with a small magnet attached on the inside
of it.
Hm, I'm now wondering if wearing earphones/headphones can get rid of a
headache.
Yes.If you dont connect them to an audio source,,,,,,
I heard that. Pardon ?
PS   Welcome if you're new, rather than an umrat in a new coat...
Shirley the wearing of new coats takes place after Christmas when you
show off what you bought in the January Sales - or am I being terribly
old fashioned?

P.S. +1 on the welcome to that newrat. Splendid de-lurk.
--
Sam Plusnet
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2019-11-27 23:12:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
On Wed, 27 Nov 2019 00:12:02 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Do anyrats know anything about Tourmaline/magnetic products for medical
purposes - or self-heating products?
[]
Post by Penny
I've never come across anything containing tourmaline which claimed medical
benefits but have seen various thing with magnets in which did - I've tried
some of those.
[]
Post by Penny
As for heat - in my experience, if some part of my body hurts it tends to
give off heat all by itself, even when the hurt is not caused by infection.
Presumably blood does its repair thing* and sends in the troops which heat
the area up a bit. If magnets can increase that effect it may be a good
thing.
I hadn't thought of that - given the added constriction of a belt (or
whatever), you may be on to something there.
Post by Penny
*I was reading about horseshoe crabs recently. Their blood, which is blue,
it highly active on the repair front and will enclose and exclude any
foreign matter, such as bacteria and viruses, so they can't hurt anything.
Consequently horseshoe crabs are harvested and used as blood donors before
being returned to the sea. The blood, or some part of it, is then used to
clean human blood for transfusions. Work is being done to synthesise the
factor in the crab blood which does this magic. Then the crabs can go back
to being used as fish bait instead.
Fascinating! Thanks.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

The motto of the Royal Society is: 'Take nobody's word for it'. Scepticism has
value. - Brian Cox, RT 2015/3/14-20
Anne B
2019-11-28 08:21:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Penny
*I was reading about horseshoe crabs recently. Their blood, which is blue,
it highly active on the repair front and will enclose and exclude any
foreign matter, such as bacteria and viruses, so they can't hurt anything.
Consequently horseshoe crabs are harvested and used as blood donors before
being returned to the sea. The blood, or some part of it, is then used to
clean human blood for transfusions. Work is being done to synthesise the
factor in the crab blood which does this magic. Then the crabs can go back
to being used as fish bait instead.
Fascinating! Thanks.
I read something about that too, which went on to say that they had
found that it lowered the breeding success of the crabs whose blood had
been 'harvested' and that this pratice is probably not sustainable in
the long term.

Anne B
Penny
2019-11-28 10:00:41 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 28 Nov 2019 08:21:11 +0000, Anne B <***@btinternet.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Anne B
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Penny
*I was reading about horseshoe crabs recently. Their blood, which is blue,
it highly active on the repair front and will enclose and exclude any
foreign matter, such as bacteria and viruses, so they can't hurt anything.
Consequently horseshoe crabs are harvested and used as blood donors before
being returned to the sea. The blood, or some part of it, is then used to
clean human blood for transfusions. Work is being done to synthesise the
factor in the crab blood which does this magic. Then the crabs can go back
to being used as fish bait instead.
Fascinating! Thanks.
I read something about that too, which went on to say that they had
found that it lowered the breeding success of the crabs whose blood had
been 'harvested' and that this pratice is probably not sustainable in
the long term.
I shared it on Facebook - perhaps you saw it there.
Horseshoe crabs (probably all crabs, now I think about it) have a history
far far longer than humans, we really should take more care of these
things. I wondered if returning them to the sea in an area a long way from
where they were caught, was a factor in the lower breeding success.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Steve Hague
2019-11-28 11:24:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
Post by Anne B
the long term.
I shared it on Facebook - perhaps you saw it there.
Horseshoe crabs (probably all crabs, now I think about it) have a history
far far longer than humans, we really should take more care of these
things. I wondered if returning them to the sea in an area a long way from
where they were caught, was a factor in the lower breeding success.
Horseshoe crabs are neither crabs nor horseshoes, but they are amazing
creatures with a very long history indeed. Iirc, their closest relatives
are woodlice. I like woodlice too.
Steve
Penny
2019-11-28 13:04:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 28 Nov 2019 11:24:55 +0000, Steve Hague <***@gmail.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Penny
Post by Anne B
the long term.
I shared it on Facebook - perhaps you saw it there.
Horseshoe crabs (probably all crabs, now I think about it) have a history
far far longer than humans, we really should take more care of these
things. I wondered if returning them to the sea in an area a long way from
where they were caught, was a factor in the lower breeding success.
Horseshoe crabs are neither crabs nor horseshoes, but they are amazing
creatures with a very long history indeed. Iirc, their closest relatives
are woodlice. I like woodlice too.
Well if woodlice could be blood donors I can provide a seemingly endless
supply!
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
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