Discussion:
pass the parcel ...
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DavidK
2019-09-20 09:45:52 UTC
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Are Phoebe and co wanting to rent land or buy? There's that large plot
that Brian bought from BL and then had to sell back at a loss in order
to generate some cash.
Penny
2019-09-20 10:23:48 UTC
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On Fri, 20 Sep 2019 10:45:52 +0100, DavidK <***@invalid.invalid>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by DavidK
Are Phoebe and co wanting to rent land or buy? There's that large plot
that Brian bought from BL and then had to sell back at a loss in order
to generate some cash.
Wasn't there also a parcel near Spiritual Home he hung onto to pacify Kate,
that would be ideal for rewilding. Or is that the bit you are talking
about?
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Mike
2019-09-20 10:59:56 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by DavidK
Are Phoebe and co wanting to rent land or buy? There's that large plot
that Brian bought from BL and then had to sell back at a loss in order
to generate some cash.
Wasn't there also a parcel near Spiritual Home he hung onto to pacify Kate,
that would be ideal for rewilding. Or is that the bit you are talking
about?
It strikes me that a good source of supply of parcels would be via Parcel
Farce - or maybe my awaited Amazon goods from China are still lying fallow
elsewhere.
--
Toodle Pip
krw
2019-09-20 11:00:33 UTC
Reply
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Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by DavidK
Are Phoebe and co wanting to rent land or buy? There's that large plot
that Brian bought from BL and then had to sell back at a loss in order
to generate some cash.
Wasn't there also a parcel near Spiritual Home he hung onto to pacify Kate,
that would be ideal for rewilding. Or is that the bit you are talking
about?
He sold all the BL land back to BL. The piece not sold was part of Home
Farm land.

They could rewild the green cemetery area.

They want to lease as they cannot afford to buy. But there are simply
not 400 acres available in Ambridge if you look at farm acreages
Home Farm 1550 or so
Brookfield 469
Bridge 172 acres
Berrow Estate 1020 acres
Grange Farm 50 acres

Where are you going to find 400 acres from that?

Overend farm or whatever it was is not given!
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
DavidK
2019-11-18 09:27:02 UTC
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Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by DavidK
Are Phoebe and co wanting to rent land or buy? There's that large plot
that Brian bought from BL and then had to sell back at a loss in order
to generate some cash.
Wasn't there also a parcel near Spiritual Home he hung onto to pacify Kate,
that would be ideal for rewilding. Or is that the bit you are talking
about?
He sold all the BL land back to BL.  The piece not sold was part of Home
Farm land.
They could rewild the green cemetery area.
They want to lease as they cannot afford to buy.  But there are simply
not 400 acres available in Ambridge if you look at farm acreages
Home Farm 1550 or so
Brookfield 469
Bridge 172 acres
Berrow Estate 1020 acres
Grange Farm 50 acres
Where are you going to find 400 acres from that?
Overend farm or whatever it was is not given!
I'll take my consultancy fees in virtual mint aero thank you
carolet
2019-11-18 16:06:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by DavidK
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by DavidK
Are Phoebe and co wanting to rent land or buy? There's that large plot
that Brian bought from BL and then had to sell back at a loss in order
to generate some cash.
Wasn't there also a parcel near Spiritual Home he hung onto to pacify Kate,
that would be ideal for rewilding. Or is that the bit you are talking
about?
He sold all the BL land back to BL.  The piece not sold was part of
Home Farm land.
They could rewild the green cemetery area.
They want to lease as they cannot afford to buy.  But there are simply
not 400 acres available in Ambridge if you look at farm acreages
Home Farm 1550 or so
Brookfield 469
Bridge 172 acres
Berrow Estate 1020 acres
Grange Farm 50 acres
Where are you going to find 400 acres from that?
Overend farm or whatever it was is not given!
I'll take my consultancy fees in virtual mint aero thank you
I'm not so sure that you deserve it. The land that Brian bought was
already pretty wild, wasn't it? They must be talking about a different
area of land that is currently being cultivated.
--
CaroleT
DavidK
2019-11-18 19:00:07 UTC
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Post by carolet
Post by DavidK
I'll take my consultancy fees in virtual mint aero thank you
I'm not so sure that you deserve it. The land that Brian bought was
already pretty wild, wasn't it? They must be talking about a different
area of land that is currently being cultivated.
All together now, "wild, it was livid!", there, doesn't that feel better?

I think it was poor-grade but maybe it just needed some of Adam's
herbal-leys (lays?). I don't suppose Phoebe and co are allowed to put
fertiliser on rewilded land but I would guess that herbal-lay seeds
would be allowed.
Sid Nuncius
2019-11-19 06:49:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by DavidK
Post by carolet
Post by DavidK
I'll take my consultancy fees in virtual mint aero thank you
I'm not so sure that you deserve it. The land that Brian bought was
already pretty wild, wasn't it? They must be talking about a different
area of land that is currently being cultivated.
All together now, "wild, it was livid!", there, doesn't that feel better?
I think it was poor-grade but maybe it just needed some of Adam's
herbal-leys (lays?).
All together now:
"There are nine and sixty ways of constructing herbal lays,
And every single one of them is right."


Well, it feels better to me. So there.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Mike
2019-11-19 08:13:12 UTC
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Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by DavidK
Post by carolet
Post by DavidK
I'll take my consultancy fees in virtual mint aero thank you
I'm not so sure that you deserve it. The land that Brian bought was
already pretty wild, wasn't it? They must be talking about a different
area of land that is currently being cultivated.
All together now, "wild, it was livid!", there, doesn't that feel better?
I think it was poor-grade but maybe it just needed some of Adam's
herbal-leys (lays?).
"There are nine and sixty ways of constructing herbal lays,
And every single one of them is right."
Well, it feels better to me. So there.
Are you evangelical about that Sid? You know, a Lay Preacher?
--
Toodle Pip
BrritSki
2019-11-19 08:16:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by DavidK
Post by carolet
Post by DavidK
I'll take my consultancy fees in virtual mint aero thank you
I'm not so sure that you deserve it. The land that Brian bought was
already pretty wild, wasn't it? They must be talking about a
different area of land that is currently being cultivated.
All together now, "wild, it was livid!", there, doesn't that feel better?
I think it was poor-grade but maybe it just needed some of Adam's
herbal-leys (lays?).
"There are nine and sixty ways of constructing herbal lays,
And every single one of them is right."
Well, it feels better to me.  So there.
69. <snigger>

PS And thanks for the introduction to the pome.
For umrats who don't know it:
<http://www.kiplingsociety.co.uk/poems_neolithic.htm>
Chris J Dixon
2019-11-19 08:31:59 UTC
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Post by BrritSki
PS And thanks for the introduction to the pome.
<http://www.kiplingsociety.co.uk/poems_neolithic.htm>
Every day is a school day! ;-)

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk @ChrisJDixon1
Plant amazing Acers.
Tony Smith Gloucestershire
2019-11-19 08:47:03 UTC
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Thanks for the pome.
Jenny M Benson
2019-11-19 10:20:17 UTC
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Post by Sid Nuncius
"There are nine and sixty ways of constructing herbal lays,
And every single one of them is right."
Well, it feels better to me.  So there.
69.  <snigger>
PS  And thanks for the introduction to the pome.
<http://www.kiplingsociety.co.uk/poems_neolithic.htm>
Gosh! How has that escaped me in all these years? Thank you Sid and
Brritters. Once again proof that Umra is life-enriching.
--
Jenny M Benson
http://jennygenes.blogspot.co.uk/
Penny
2019-11-19 11:47:25 UTC
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On Tue, 19 Nov 2019 10:20:17 +0000, Jenny M Benson <***@hotmail.co.uk>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Sid Nuncius
"There are nine and sixty ways of constructing herbal lays,
And every single one of them is right."
Well, it feels better to me.  So there.
69.  <snigger>
PS  And thanks for the introduction to the pome.
<http://www.kiplingsociety.co.uk/poems_neolithic.htm>
Gosh! How has that escaped me in all these years? Thank you Sid and
Brritters. Once again proof that Umra is life-enriching.
Languid wave
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Nick Leverton
2019-11-19 12:05:56 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Sid Nuncius
"There are nine and sixty ways of constructing herbal lays,
And every single one of them is right."
Well, it feels better to me.  So there.
69.  <snigger>
PS  And thanks for the introduction to the pome.
<http://www.kiplingsociety.co.uk/poems_neolithic.htm>
Gosh! How has that escaped me in all these years? Thank you Sid and
Brritters. Once again proof that Umra is life-enriching.
Languid wave
Worth reading the background notes linked in tiny type at the bottom of
the page, also.

Nick
--
"The Internet, a sort of ersatz counterfeit of real life"
-- Janet Street-Porter, BBC2, 19th March 1996
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2019-11-19 12:39:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Nick Leverton
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Sid Nuncius
"There are nine and sixty ways of constructing herbal lays,
And every single one of them is right."
Well, it feels better to me.  So there.
69.  <snigger>
PS  And thanks for the introduction to the pome.
<http://www.kiplingsociety.co.uk/poems_neolithic.htm>
Gosh! How has that escaped me in all these years? Thank you Sid and
Brritters. Once again proof that Umra is life-enriching.
Languid wave
Yes. A little heavy-going for me, but pleasing in that the rhymes and
rhythm/scansion are (on light reading, anyway) perfect, unlike that of
many poets - over quite a long poem.
Post by Nick Leverton
Worth reading the background notes linked in tiny type at the bottom of
the page, also.
Agreed. Nice that someone has gone into such depth! Such intellectual
rigour is most pleasing.
Post by Nick Leverton
Nick
John
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Never. For me, there has to be a meaning. There's not much meaning in eating
bugs. - Darcey Bussell (on whether she'd appear on /I'm a Celebrity/), in RT
2015/11/28-12/4
BrritSki
2019-11-19 12:53:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Nick Leverton
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Sid Nuncius
"There are nine and sixty ways of constructing herbal lays,
And every single one of them is right."
Well, it feels better to me.  So there.
69.  <snigger>
PS  And thanks for the introduction to the pome.
<http://www.kiplingsociety.co.uk/poems_neolithic.htm>
Gosh! How has that escaped me in all these years? Thank you Sid and
Brritters. Once again proof that Umra is life-enriching.
Languid wave
Worth reading the background notes linked in tiny type at the bottom of
the page, also.
Indeed. Ta.
Sid Nuncius
2019-11-19 18:18:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Nick Leverton
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Sid Nuncius
"There are nine and sixty ways of constructing herbal lays,
And every single one of them is right."
Well, it feels better to me.  So there.
69.  <snigger>
PS  And thanks for the introduction to the pome.
<http://www.kiplingsociety.co.uk/poems_neolithic.htm>
Gosh! How has that escaped me in all these years? Thank you Sid and
Brritters. Once again proof that Umra is life-enriching.
Languid wave
Worth reading the background notes linked in tiny type at the bottom of
the page, also.
Indeed. And, FWIW, I think the story The Knife And The Naked Chalk
which is cited in the notes is very good, too. In spite of the rather
whimsical set-up (common to all his Puck stories) the depiction of the
sacrifice and terrible loneliness of godhead makes it one of Kipling's
most haunting for me, and one of his most insightful, too.
https://www.telelib.com/authors/K/KiplingRudyard/prose/RewardsFaries/nakedchalk.html
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Vicky Ayech
2019-11-19 21:45:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Tue, 19 Nov 2019 18:18:28 +0000, Sid Nuncius
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Nick Leverton
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Sid Nuncius
"There are nine and sixty ways of constructing herbal lays,
And every single one of them is right."
Well, it feels better to me.  So there.
69.  <snigger>
PS  And thanks for the introduction to the pome.
<http://www.kiplingsociety.co.uk/poems_neolithic.htm>
Gosh! How has that escaped me in all these years? Thank you Sid and
Brritters. Once again proof that Umra is life-enriching.
Languid wave
Worth reading the background notes linked in tiny type at the bottom of
the page, also.
Indeed. And, FWIW, I think the story The Knife And The Naked Chalk
which is cited in the notes is very good, too. In spite of the rather
whimsical set-up (common to all his Puck stories) the depiction of the
sacrifice and terrible loneliness of godhead makes it one of Kipling's
most haunting for me, and one of his most insightful, too.
https://www.telelib.com/authors/K/KiplingRudyard/prose/RewardsFaries/nakedchalk.html
I'm a fan of his verse and of the stories too. All the Puck ones,
Stalky, Jungle Book, Just So ones. I can quote chunks of his poems as
I loved them as a child and learned some. I did this one for a Lamda
exam
https://www.poetryloverspage.com/poets/kipling/song_of_little_hunter.html
The list of available poetry books doesn't seem toinclude the one I
have
A Choice of Kipling's Verse. It's water-logged as I used to declaim
in the bath :)
Sid Nuncius
2019-11-20 07:04:28 UTC
Reply
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Post by Vicky Ayech
On Tue, 19 Nov 2019 18:18:28 +0000, Sid Nuncius
<Kipling>
Post by Vicky Ayech
I'm a fan of his verse and of the stories too. All the Puck ones,
Stalky, Jungle Book, Just So ones. I can quote chunks of his poems as
I loved them as a child and learned some. I did this one for a Lamda
exam
https://www.poetryloverspage.com/poets/kipling/song_of_little_hunter.html
The list of available poetry books doesn't seem toinclude the one I
have
A Choice of Kipling's Verse. It's water-logged as I used to declaim
in the bath :)
Yes, I was brought up on The Just So Stories and The Jungle Books,read
Stalky at school and have been a Kipling fan ever since. He can be
politically dodgy but IMO no more so than most of his period. Ditto his
anti-semitism. He can be over sentimental at times; his dead children
are a bit much in stories like They, for example, but given the loss of
his daughter and then his son it's understandable. And so on.
Nevertheless, he was a very fine writer; he could be very funny, very
perceptive and very humane - and he was an exceptionally good man with
an adjective, IMO. I've read a lot of his work over the years, mainly
with great pleasure, and I think he's too glibly dismissed as a
tub-thumping, racist imperialist these days.

YMMV.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2019-11-20 09:59:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
In message <***@mid.individual.net>, Sid Nuncius
<***@hotmail.co.uk> writes:
[]
Post by Sid Nuncius
Yes, I was brought up on The Just So Stories and The Jungle Books,read
Yes, I read those (I think for myself rather than having those read to
me).
Post by Sid Nuncius
Stalky at school and have been a Kipling fan ever since. He can be
I don't remember reading Stalky at all: if they were school stories, I
think I read more Bunter from that period. (I think Jennings and
Derbyshire were somewhat later.)
Post by Sid Nuncius
politically dodgy but IMO no more so than most of his period. Ditto
[]
Post by Sid Nuncius
with an adjective, IMO. I've read a lot of his work over the years,
mainly with great pleasure, and I think he's too glibly dismissed as a
tub-thumping, racist imperialist these days.
Yes, other times by their standards, not ours.
Post by Sid Nuncius
YMMV.
And he does make some nice cakes. (Sorry, IGMC.)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Veni, Vidi, Vera (I came, I saw, we'll meet again) - Mik from S+AS Limited
(***@saslimited.demon.co.uk), 1998
Vicky Ayech
2019-11-20 11:22:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 20 Nov 2019 09:59:07 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Sid Nuncius
Yes, I was brought up on The Just So Stories and The Jungle Books,read
Yes, I read those (I think for myself rather than having those read to
me).
Post by Sid Nuncius
Stalky at school and have been a Kipling fan ever since. He can be
I don't remember reading Stalky at all: if they were school stories, I
think I read more Bunter from that period. (I think Jennings and
Derbyshire were somewhat later.)
You should try Stalky, jpg. They are not your average school story.
Stalky is fine for adults. He was cool. And tehre is India stuff too.

I Loved some story poems. The Wreck of the Mary Gloster.
I've seen your carriages blocking half of the Oxford Road
But never the Doctor's broughham, to help the missus unload.

Or The Law of the Jungle. How the wolf pack dynamics work.
Penny
2019-11-20 12:55:44 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 20 Nov 2019 09:59:07 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Sid Nuncius
Yes, I was brought up on The Just So Stories and The Jungle Books,read
Yes, I read those (I think for myself rather than having those read to
me).
My father loved reading them out loud so I grew up with them too and later
read other Kipling myself.
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Sid Nuncius
Stalky at school and have been a Kipling fan ever since. He can be
But not Stalky - maybe we didn't have any in the house.
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I don't remember reading Stalky at all: if they were school stories, I
think I read more Bunter from that period. (I think Jennings and
Derbyshire were somewhat later.)
I read all the Jennings and Derbyshire books, borrowed from my brothers.
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Sid Nuncius
politically dodgy but IMO no more so than most of his period. Ditto
[]
Post by Sid Nuncius
with an adjective, IMO. I've read a lot of his work over the years,
mainly with great pleasure, and I think he's too glibly dismissed as a
tub-thumping, racist imperialist these days.
I think I was blind to all that at the time. Many things which were
commonplace in my childhood would horrify my own children.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
DavidK
2019-11-20 10:11:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
I'm a fan of his verse and of the stories too. All the Puck ones,
Stalky, Jungle Book, Just So ones
I liked the Jungle Book* and Just So stories but I'm pleased I remember
being oldly mildly interested by the Stalky stories. IIRC they involve
killing a cat so that they can push it under a rival house's
floor-boards and torturing a sixth-former because he was torturing a
younger boy.

*Particularly "The letting In of the Jungle" or something like that.
Sid Nuncius
2019-11-20 18:08:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by DavidK
Post by Vicky Ayech
I'm a fan of his verse and of the stories too. All the Puck ones,
Stalky, Jungle Book, Just So ones
I liked the Jungle Book* and Just So stories but I'm pleased I remember
being oldly mildly interested by the Stalky stories. IIRC they involve
killing a cat so that they can push it under a rival house's
floor-boards and torturing a sixth-former because he was torturing a
younger boy.
They find a dead cat rather than killing one and put it under King's
House floorboards because King has, wholly unfairly, encouraged his boys
to sneer at Stalky and friends as unwashed an smelly. And yes, they
bully ("torture" may be a better word) a loathsome senior boy in exactly
the way he bullied a very small boy. Many of the Stalky stories are of
revenge for injustice or slight or hubris (as are some of his other
stories, like the famous The Village That Voted The Earth Was Flat)
which appealed to me as an 11- or 12-year-old but don't so much now.
There's still some great prose, though.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
DavidK
2019-11-21 11:33:03 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by DavidK
Post by Vicky Ayech
I'm a fan of his verse and of the stories too. All the Puck ones,
Stalky, Jungle Book, Just So ones
I liked the Jungle Book* and Just So stories but I'm pleased I
remember being oldly mildly interested by the Stalky stories. IIRC
they involve killing a cat so that they can push it under a rival
house's floor-boards and torturing a sixth-former because he was
torturing a younger boy.
They find a dead cat rather than killing one and put it under King's
House floorboards because King has, wholly unfairly, encouraged his boys
to sneer at Stalky and friends as unwashed an smelly. And yes, they
bully ("torture" may be a better word) a loathsome senior boy in exactly
the way he bullied a very small boy.  Many of the Stalky stories are of
revenge for injustice or slight or hubris (as are some of his other
stories, like the famous The Village That Voted The Earth Was Flat)
which appealed to me as an 11- or 12-year-old but don't so much now.
There's still some great prose, though.
From <http://www.gutenberg.org/files/3006/3006-0.txt>

.....

“This is piffling,” said McTurk. “Let's get our sallies, and go and
shoot bunnies.”

.....

Three saloon-pistols, with a supply of bulleted breech-caps, were stored
in Stalky's trunk,

....

They crawled out, brushed one another clean, slid the saloon-pistols
down a trouser-leg, and hurried forth to a deep and solitary Devonshire
lane in whose flanks a boy might sometimes slay a young rabbit. They
threw themselves down under the rank elder bushes, and began to think
aloud.

.....

“Then why did he want the tuppence, Turkey? He's gettin' too beastly
independent. Hi! There's a bunny. No, it ain't. It's a cat, by Jove! You
plug first.”
Sid Nuncius
2019-11-21 18:29:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by DavidK
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by DavidK
Post by Vicky Ayech
I'm a fan of his verse and of the stories too. All the Puck ones,
Stalky, Jungle Book, Just So ones
I liked the Jungle Book* and Just So stories but I'm pleased I
remember being oldly mildly interested by the Stalky stories. IIRC
they involve killing a cat so that they can push it under a rival
house's floor-boards and torturing a sixth-former because he was
torturing a younger boy.
They find a dead cat rather than killing one and put it under King's
House floorboards because King has, wholly unfairly, encouraged his
boys to sneer at Stalky and friends as unwashed an smelly. And yes,
they bully ("torture" may be a better word) a loathsome senior boy in
exactly the way he bullied a very small boy.  Many of the Stalky
stories are of revenge for injustice or slight or hubris (as are some
of his other stories, like the famous The Village That Voted The Earth
Was Flat) which appealed to me as an 11- or 12-year-old but don't so
much now. There's still some great prose, though.
From <http://www.gutenberg.org/files/3006/3006-0.txt>
.....
“This is piffling,” said McTurk. “Let's get our sallies, and go and
shoot bunnies.”
.....
Three saloon-pistols, with a supply of bulleted breech-caps, were stored
in Stalky's trunk,
....
They crawled out, brushed one another clean, slid the saloon-pistols
down a trouser-leg, and hurried forth to a deep and solitary Devonshire
lane in whose flanks a boy might sometimes slay a young rabbit. They
threw themselves down under the rank elder bushes, and began to think
aloud.
.....
“Then why did he want the tuppence, Turkey? He's gettin' too beastly
independent. Hi! There's a bunny. No, it ain't. It's a cat, by Jove! You
plug first.”
Apologies - my mistake. I'd forgotten that they shot the cat themselves
for sport. They didn't do it specifically to hide her under the boards,
but thought of that later. Not that it in any way mitigates the
gratuitous cruelty of shooting her, you understand - just explaining the
source of my faulty memory.

There is quite a lot of gratuitous cruelty in Stalky & Co. It can be
seen as an unpleasant character trait in Kipling (possibly with some
justification) but I also think it's simply an accurate reflection of
the reality of many boys' schools - both at the time and more recently.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Mike Ruddock
2019-11-21 12:05:49 UTC
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Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Tue, 19 Nov 2019 18:18:28 +0000, Sid Nuncius
<Kipling>
Post by Vicky Ayech
I'm a fan of his verse and of the stories too. All the Puck ones,
Stalky, Jungle Book, Just So ones. I can quote chunks of his poems as
I loved them as a child and learned some. I did this one for a Lamda
exam
https://www.poetryloverspage.com/poets/kipling/song_of_little_hunter.html
The list of available poetry books doesn't seem toinclude the one I
have
A Choice of Kipling's Verse.   It's water-logged as I used to declaim
in the bath :)
Yes, I was brought up on The Just So Stories and The Jungle Books,read
Stalky at school and have been a Kipling fan ever since.  He can be
politically dodgy but IMO no more so than most of his period.  Ditto his
anti-semitism.  He can be over sentimental at times; his dead children
are a bit much in stories like They, for example, but given the loss of
his daughter and then his son it's understandable.  And so on.
Nevertheless, he was a very fine writer; he could be very funny, very
perceptive and very humane - and he was an exceptionally good man with
an adjective, IMO.  I've read a lot of his work over the years, mainly
with great pleasure, and I think he's too glibly dismissed as a
tub-thumping, racist imperialist these days.
YMMV.
I used to teach in North Devon and Westward Ho! (don't forget the
screamer) was a place we frequently visited. The school Stalky and Co is
set in was there. I can't recall what use the building is put to now,
but it was still there when I lived in Bideford.
Mike Ruddock
Steve Hague
2019-11-20 08:43:34 UTC
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Post by Sid Nuncius
"There are nine and sixty ways of constructing herbal lays,
And every single one of them is right."
Well, it feels better to me.  So there.
69.  <snigger>
PS  And thanks for the introduction to the pome.
<http://www.kiplingsociety.co.uk/poems_neolithic.htm>
Gosh!  How has that escaped me in all these years?  Thank you Sid and
Brritters.  Once again proof that Umra is life-enriching.
I didn't know that one either, although to be fair I've only eve been an
occasional Kippler.
Steve
Sid Nuncius
2019-11-20 08:52:36 UTC
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Post by Steve Hague
Post by Sid Nuncius
"There are nine and sixty ways of constructing herbal lays,
And every single one of them is right."
Well, it feels better to me.  So there.
69.  <snigger>
PS  And thanks for the introduction to the pome.
<http://www.kiplingsociety.co.uk/poems_neolithic.htm>
Gosh!  How has that escaped me in all these years?  Thank you Sid and
Brritters.  Once again proof that Umra is life-enriching.
I didn't know that one either, although to be fair I've only eve been an
occasional Kippler.
Which in turn reminds me of this little gem by J.K. Stephen[1] (of which
Kipling said that he would have given much to have written it himself):

Will there never come a season
Which shall rid us from the curse
Of a prose which knows no reason
And an unmelodious verse:
When the world shall cease to wonder
At the genius of an Ass,
And a boy's eccentric blunder
Shall not bring success to pass:

When mankind shall be delivered
From the clash of magazines,
And the inkstand shall be shivered
Into countless smithereens:
When there stands a muzzled stripling,
Mute, beside a muzzled bore:
When the Rudyards cease from Kipling
And the Haggards Ride no more.


[1]Who also wrote this brilliant parody of Wordsworth:

Two voices are there: one is of the deep;
It learns the storm-cloud's thunderous melody,
Now roars, now murmurs with the changing sea,
Now bird-like pipes, now closes soft in sleep:
And one is of an old half-witted sheep
Which bleats articulate monotony,
And indicates that two and one are three,
That grass is green, lakes damp, and mountains steep:
And, Wordsworth, both are thine: at certain times
Forth from the heart of thy melodious rhymes,
The form and pressure of high thoughts will burst:
At other times - good Lord! I'd rather be
Quite unacquainted with the ABC
Than write such hopeless rubbish as thy worst.


That's enough poems - Ed.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Nick Odell
2019-11-20 09:18:14 UTC
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On Wed, 20 Nov 2019 08:52:36 +0000, Sid Nuncius
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Sid Nuncius
"There are nine and sixty ways of constructing herbal lays,
And every single one of them is right."
Well, it feels better to me.  So there.
69.  <snigger>
PS  And thanks for the introduction to the pome.
<http://www.kiplingsociety.co.uk/poems_neolithic.htm>
Gosh!  How has that escaped me in all these years?  Thank you Sid and
Brritters.  Once again proof that Umra is life-enriching.
I didn't know that one either, although to be fair I've only eve been an
occasional Kippler.
Which in turn reminds me of this little gem by J.K. Stephen[1] (of which
Will there never come a season
Which shall rid us from the curse
Of a prose which knows no reason
When the world shall cease to wonder
At the genius of an Ass,
And a boy's eccentric blunder
When mankind shall be delivered
From the clash of magazines,
And the inkstand shall be shivered
When there stands a muzzled stripling,
When the Rudyards cease from Kipling
And the Haggards Ride no more.
Two voices are there: one is of the deep;
It learns the storm-cloud's thunderous melody,
Now roars, now murmurs with the changing sea,
And one is of an old half-witted sheep
Which bleats articulate monotony,
And indicates that two and one are three,
And, Wordsworth, both are thine: at certain times
Forth from the heart of thy melodious rhymes,
At other times - good Lord! I'd rather be
Quite unacquainted with the ABC
Than write such hopeless rubbish as thy worst.
That's enough poems - Ed.
Nothing like Wordsworth IMO
- The Poem's about 40,000 words too short.

#Nick
Sid Nuncius
2019-11-20 18:13:04 UTC
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Post by Nick Odell
On Wed, 20 Nov 2019 08:52:36 +0000, Sid Nuncius
Post by Sid Nuncius
Two voices are there: one is of the deep;
It learns the storm-cloud's thunderous melody,
Now roars, now murmurs with the changing sea,
And one is of an old half-witted sheep
Which bleats articulate monotony,
And indicates that two and one are three,
And, Wordsworth, both are thine: at certain times
Forth from the heart of thy melodious rhymes,
At other times - good Lord! I'd rather be
Quite unacquainted with the ABC
Than write such hopeless rubbish as thy worst.
That's enough poems - Ed.
Nothing like Wordsworth IMO
- The Poem's about 40,000 words too short.
:o)) So you had to study the boodly Prelude, then?

It's actually based around two of Wordsworth's sonnets:

' Thoughts of a Briton on the Subjugation of Switzerland'
Two Voices are there -one is of the Sea,
One of the Mountains; each a mighty Voice:
In both from age to age thou didst rejoice;
They were thy chosen music, Liberty!
There came a tyrant, and with holy glee
Thou fought'st against him; but hast vainly striven:
Thou from thy Alpine holds at length art driven
Where not a torrent murmurs heard by thee.
Of one deep bliss thine ear hath been bereft;
Then cleave, O cleave to that which still is left;
For, high-souled Maid, what sorrow would it be
That Mountain floods should thunder as before,
And Ocean bellow from his rocky shore,
And neither awful Voice be heard by Thee!

and

The world is too much with us; late and soon,
Getting and spending, we lay waste our powers;
Little we see in Nature that is ours;
We have given our hearts away, a sordid boon!
This Sea that bares her bosom to the moon,
The winds that will be howling at all hours,
And are up-gathered now like sleeping flowers,
For this, for everything, we are out of tune;
It moves us not.--Great God! I'd rather be
A Pagan suckled in a creed outworn;
So might I, standing on this pleasant lea,
Have glimpses that would make me less forlorn;
Have sight of Proteus rising from the sea;
Or hear old Triton blow his wreathed horn.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Penny
2019-11-20 13:00:29 UTC
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On Wed, 20 Nov 2019 08:52:36 +0000, Sid Nuncius
Post by Sid Nuncius
When the Rudyards cease from Kipling
And the Haggards Ride no more.
Love it!

All that sprang to my mind was this from the Muppet Show:
"Do you like Kippling?"
"I don't know, I've never kippled."
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
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