Discussion:
OT but sort of Lord peter connected
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Vicky Ayech
2019-09-19 10:37:45 UTC
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There is a There is a Lord Peter Wimsey Appreciation Society on fb.
They were discussing names servants are called by in the books and one
person posted this to illustrate a point. I enjoyed the beginning
which covered the point and read it all
https://ebooks.adelaide.edu.au/s/saki/clovis/chapter26.html?fbclid=IwAR1o9wJHfQPg8uI1q0cbDTgYjgZS3o5YtXlWHqRIYFnKTjPmQNNxJYI9xN4
Thought somerats might like it.

The whole book is free for the kindle edition.
Serena Blanchflower
2019-09-19 14:46:39 UTC
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Post by Vicky Ayech
There is a There is a Lord Peter Wimsey Appreciation Society on fb.
They were discussing names servants are called by in the books and one
person posted this to illustrate a point. I enjoyed the beginning
which covered the point and read it all
https://ebooks.adelaide.edu.au/s/saki/clovis/chapter26.html?fbclid=IwAR1o9wJHfQPg8uI1q0cbDTgYjgZS3o5YtXlWHqRIYFnKTjPmQNNxJYI9xN4
Thought somerats might like it.
The whole book is free for the kindle edition.
Saki is to be highly recommended, for any umrats who aren't already on
familiar terms with him :)
--
Best wishes, Serena
And, while it was regarded as pretty good evidence of criminality to be
living in a slum, for some reason owning a whole street of them merely
got you invited to the very best social occasions. (Terry Pratchett)
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2019-09-19 17:40:52 UTC
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Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Vicky Ayech
There is a There is a Lord Peter Wimsey Appreciation Society on fb.
They were discussing names servants are called by in the books and one
person posted this to illustrate a point. I enjoyed the beginning
which covered the point and read it all
https://ebooks.adelaide.edu.au/s/saki/clovis/chapter26.html?fbclid=IwAR
1o9wJHfQPg8uI1q0cbDTgYjgZS3o5YtXlWHqRIYFnKTjPmQNNxJYI9xN4
Thought somerats might like it.
The whole book is free for the kindle edition.
Saki is to be highly recommended, for any umrats who aren't already on
familiar terms with him :)
I passed a pleasant few minutes reading it. I drank no Sake while doing
so though, so was a little puzzled by that reference: the piece seemed
more Wimsey-cal than eastern ... (-:
--


Three- (or four-) way referendum, if we _have_ to have another one.

(Where has the "treat northern Ireland differently" option gone?)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

"The great tragedy of science, the slaying of a beautiful theory by an ugly
fact. - Thomas Henry Huxley
Serena Blanchflower
2019-09-19 20:03:36 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Vicky Ayech
There is a There is a Lord Peter Wimsey Appreciation Society on fb.
They were discussing names servants are called by in the books and one
person posted this to illustrate a point. I enjoyed the beginning
which covered the point and read it all
https://ebooks.adelaide.edu.au/s/saki/clovis/chapter26.html?fbclid=IwAR
1o9wJHfQPg8uI1q0cbDTgYjgZS3o5YtXlWHqRIYFnKTjPmQNNxJYI9xN4
Thought somerats might like it.
 The whole book is free for the kindle edition.
Saki is to be  highly recommended, for any umrats who aren't already
on familiar terms with him :)
I passed a pleasant few minutes reading it. I drank no Sake while doing
so though, so was a little puzzled by that reference: the piece seemed
You obviously didn't notice the name of the author, Hector Hugh Munro,
who wrote under the pen name of Saki. He generally wrote about the same
section of society that PG Wodehouse satirised, but with a much more
sardonic view and with a far darker edge to his writing.
--
Best wishes, Serena
The advantage of a bad memory is that one enjoys several times the same
good things for the first time (Friedrich Nietzsche)
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2019-09-19 21:33:50 UTC
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Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Vicky Ayech
There is a There is a Lord Peter Wimsey Appreciation Society on fb.
They were discussing names servants are called by in the books and one
person posted this to illustrate a point. I enjoyed the beginning
which covered the point and read it all
https://ebooks.adelaide.edu.au/s/saki/clovis/chapter26.html?fbclid=IwAR
1o9wJHfQPg8uI1q0cbDTgYjgZS3o5YtXlWHqRIYFnKTjPmQNNxJYI9xN4
Thought somerats might like it.
 The whole book is free for the kindle edition.
Saki is to be  highly recommended, for any umrats who aren't already
on familiar terms with him :)
I passed a pleasant few minutes reading it. I drank no Sake while
doing so though, so was a little puzzled by that reference: the piece
You obviously didn't notice the name of the author, Hector Hugh Munro,
who wrote under the pen name of Saki. He generally wrote about the
same section of society that PG Wodehouse satirised, but with a much
more sardonic view and with a far darker edge to his writing.
Ah. I didn't know that; I assumed Saki _was_ an easterner, as was
presumably the intention when the name was coined.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Abandon hope, all ye who <ENTER> here.
Sid Nuncius
2019-09-20 05:27:00 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Serena Blanchflower
You obviously didn't notice the name of the author, Hector Hugh Munro,
who wrote under the pen name of Saki.  He generally wrote about the
same section of society that PG Wodehouse satirised, but with a much
more sardonic view and with a far darker edge to his writing.
Ah. I didn't know that; I assumed Saki _was_ an easterner, as was
presumably the intention when the name was coined.
His name was Hector Hugh Monro. Born in Burma of British parents and
returned to England aged two. (Killed by a sniper while serving in WWI,
BTW, but that's of no relevance to his name.)

From Wiki:
The pen name "Saki" is most commonly assumed to be a reference to the
cupbearer in the Rubáiyát of Omar Khayyam. Both Rothay Reynolds and
Ethel Munro confirm this.

This reference is stated as fact by Emlyn Williams in his introduction
to a Saki anthology published in 1978. However, "Saki" may also or
instead be a reference to the South American monkey of that name, which
at least two commentators, Tom Sharpe and Will Self, have connected to
the "small, long-tailed monkey from the Western Hemisphere" that is a
central character in "The Remoulding of Groby Lington".

HTH
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Sid Nuncius
2019-09-19 18:32:30 UTC
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Saki is to be  highly recommended, for any umrats who aren't already on
familiar terms with him :)
<languid wave>
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
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