Discussion:
Where are you all???
(too old to reply)
Mike McMillan
2021-05-07 12:09:46 UTC
Permalink
Err……, that’s it really!
--
Toodle Pip (My other iPad is an old Pro)
Jenny M Benson
2021-05-07 12:21:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike McMillan
Err……, that’s it really!
Speaking only for myself, sitting out in the sun, knitting.

I have wandered in a couple of times (by way of exercise!) and wondered
where everyrat was.
--
Jenny M Benson
Penny
2021-05-07 13:27:18 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 7 May 2021 13:21:16 +0100, Jenny M Benson <***@hotmail.co.uk>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Mike McMillan
Err……, that’s it really!
Speaking only for myself, sitting out in the sun, knitting.
I have wandered in a couple of times (by way of exercise!) and wondered
where everyrat was.
MTAAW
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Chris
2021-05-07 15:22:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Mike McMillan
Err……, that’s it really!
Speaking only for myself, sitting out in the sun, knitting.
I have wandered in a couple of times (by way of exercise!) and wondered
where everyrat was.
MTAAW
You two must live in the tropics! No sitting outside here! Sharp wind most
of the day.

Sincerely Chris
Sam Plusnet
2021-05-07 20:16:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Mike McMillan
Err……, that’s it really!
Speaking only for myself, sitting out in the sun, knitting.
I have wandered in a couple of times (by way of exercise!) and wondered
where everyrat was.
MTAAW
Sounds like more fun than lopping a sycamore which which was getting too
big for its boots - and the neighbour's mini-greenhouse.
--
Sam Plusnet
Penny
2021-05-07 21:06:06 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 7 May 2021 21:16:05 +0100, Sam Plusnet <***@home.com> scrawled in
the dust...
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Mike McMillan
Err……, that’s it really!
Speaking only for myself, sitting out in the sun, knitting.
I have wandered in a couple of times (by way of exercise!) and wondered
where everyrat was.
MTAAW
Sounds like more fun than lopping a sycamore which which was getting too
big for its boots - and the neighbour's mini-greenhouse.
Lopping the neighbour's mini-greenhouse doesn't sound very neighbourly...

I wasn't actually knitting in the sunshine but scrabbling about with a hand
fork trying to extract ivy from the ground and figure out just how wide the
path should really be. I also dug out a couple of huge cyclamen tubers
(without damaging them - the smell is weird if you stab them by mistake).

This is the 8th month of the war against ivy - little was done in the very
wet and very cold weather of the winter. Even in good weather efforts are
brief, I'm very unfit and lacking in stamina but it's good to see the
progress when I do manage to make any.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Sam Plusnet
2021-05-08 19:22:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
the dust...
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Mike McMillan
Err……, that’s it really!
Speaking only for myself, sitting out in the sun, knitting.
I have wandered in a couple of times (by way of exercise!) and wondered
where everyrat was.
MTAAW
Sounds like more fun than lopping a sycamore which which was getting too
big for its boots - and the neighbour's mini-greenhouse.
Lopping the neighbour's mini-greenhouse doesn't sound very neighbourly...
I wasn't actually knitting in the sunshine but scrabbling about with a hand
fork trying to extract ivy from the ground and figure out just how wide the
path should really be. I also dug out a couple of huge cyclamen tubers
(without damaging them - the smell is weird if you stab them by mistake).
This is the 8th month of the war against ivy - little was done in the very
wet and very cold weather of the winter. Even in good weather efforts are
brief, I'm very unfit and lacking in stamina but it's good to see the
progress when I do manage to make any.
We too have an excess of ivy. In fact we always have an excess, but
this year it is even more excessive. We do tend to leave large amounts
of it untouched since the birds find it to be ideal nesting geography.

Cyclamen tubers do grow to great size - which is quite at odds with
those delicate little flowers.

The sycamore played the usual trick on me. Those small branches -
pretty trivial really - turn out to be quite substantial things when you
get up close and personal with them.
--
Sam Plusnet
Nick Odell
2021-05-08 20:09:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Penny
the dust...
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jenny M Benson
Err……, that’s it really!
Speaking only for myself, sitting out in the sun, knitting.
I have wandered in a couple of times (by way of exercise!) and wondered
where everyrat was.
MTAAW
Sounds like more fun than lopping a sycamore which which was getting too
big for its boots - and the neighbour's mini-greenhouse.
Lopping the neighbour's mini-greenhouse doesn't sound very neighbourly...
I wasn't actually knitting in the sunshine but scrabbling about with a hand
fork trying to extract ivy from the ground and figure out just how wide the
path should really be. I also dug out a couple of huge cyclamen tubers
(without damaging them - the smell is weird if you stab them by mistake).
This is the 8th month of the war against ivy - little was done in the very
wet and very cold weather of the winter. Even in good weather efforts are
brief, I'm very unfit and lacking in stamina but it's good to see the
progress when I do manage to make any.
We too have an excess of ivy. In fact we always have an excess, but
this year it is even more excessive. We do tend to leave large amounts
of it untouched since the birds find it to be ideal nesting geography.
Cyclamen tubers do grow to great size - which is quite at odds with
those delicate little flowers.
The sycamore played the usual trick on me. Those small branches -
pretty trivial really - turn out to be quite substantial things when you
get up close and personal with them.
My relationship with plants is rather like that of a supply teacher to
a class: I very quickly get to know the names of the ones which cause
most trouble and never really remember the rest. Convolvulus!! Leave
Bay alone, will you? Etc. Etc. So I'm not sure what a cyclamen is.
(Ferrets a bit on Google....) Hmmm... They don't look that bad. Do
they go all triffidey if you turn your back on them for a few moments?


Nick
Vicky Ayech
2021-05-08 20:45:37 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 08 May 2021 21:09:50 +0100, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Penny
the dust...
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jenny M Benson
Err……, that’s it really!
Speaking only for myself, sitting out in the sun, knitting.
I have wandered in a couple of times (by way of exercise!) and wondered
where everyrat was.
MTAAW
Sounds like more fun than lopping a sycamore which which was getting too
big for its boots - and the neighbour's mini-greenhouse.
Lopping the neighbour's mini-greenhouse doesn't sound very neighbourly...
I wasn't actually knitting in the sunshine but scrabbling about with a hand
fork trying to extract ivy from the ground and figure out just how wide the
path should really be. I also dug out a couple of huge cyclamen tubers
(without damaging them - the smell is weird if you stab them by mistake).
This is the 8th month of the war against ivy - little was done in the very
wet and very cold weather of the winter. Even in good weather efforts are
brief, I'm very unfit and lacking in stamina but it's good to see the
progress when I do manage to make any.
We too have an excess of ivy. In fact we always have an excess, but
this year it is even more excessive. We do tend to leave large amounts
of it untouched since the birds find it to be ideal nesting geography.
Cyclamen tubers do grow to great size - which is quite at odds with
those delicate little flowers.
The sycamore played the usual trick on me. Those small branches -
pretty trivial really - turn out to be quite substantial things when you
get up close and personal with them.
My relationship with plants is rather like that of a supply teacher to
a class: I very quickly get to know the names of the ones which cause
most trouble and never really remember the rest. Convolvulus!! Leave
Bay alone, will you? Etc. Etc. So I'm not sure what a cyclamen is.
(Ferrets a bit on Google....) Hmmm... They don't look that bad. Do
they go all triffidey if you turn your back on them for a few moments?
Nick
Here the rosemary and bay plants took over an area but b cut them
right back. In fact I'm worried the rosemary may never recover.
Penny
2021-05-08 22:31:55 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 08 May 2021 21:45:37 +0100, Vicky Ayech <***@gmail.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Vicky Ayech
Here the rosemary and bay plants took over an area but b cut them
right back. In fact I'm worried the rosemary may never recover.
You are probably correct. Rosemary needs chopping back a bit every year. If
you cut back into last year's wood you'll lose the whole limb.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Rosemary Miskin
2021-05-09 08:06:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
. Rosemary needs chopping back a bit every year. I
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Ouch!!

Rosemary
Penny
2021-05-09 08:31:25 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 9 May 2021 01:06:01 -0700 (PDT), Rosemary Miskin
Post by Rosemary Miskin
Post by Penny
. Rosemary needs chopping back a bit every year. I
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Ouch!!
Rosemary
Sorry, Rosemary, I didn't see you there.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Tony Smith
2021-05-10 16:45:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Rosemary Miskin
Post by Penny
. Rosemary needs chopping back a bit every year. I
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Ouch!!
Rosemary
Don't worry. The serried ranks of umratdom will gallanty stand between you and the axeman\\\person.
Sam Plusnet
2021-05-10 19:17:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony Smith
Post by Rosemary Miskin
Post by Penny
. Rosemary needs chopping back a bit every year. I
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Ouch!!
Rosemary
Don't worry. The serried ranks of umratdom will gallanty stand between you and the axeman\\\person.
I don't think ranks should be serried in the Time of Covid.
However, there doesn't seem to be an equivalent word for socially spaced
ranks.

Axeman. Spare that Rosemary!
--
Sam Plusnet
Nick Odell
2021-05-09 06:28:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Vicky Ayech
Here the rosemary and bay plants took over an area but b cut them
right back. In fact I'm worried the rosemary may never recover.
You are probably correct. Rosemary needs chopping back a bit every year. If
you cut back into last year's wood you'll lose the whole limb.
Oh dear :-( I've got a runaway rosemary bush that hasn't been
attended to in any way for several years. It seems to have inveigled
its way into everything around it. I was thinking about lopping it off
near the roots and waiting for new shoots to spring out but perhaps
that won't work after all.

I realise all plants are not the same but I devised the strategy after
my attempts to remove an unwanted apple tree[1] resulted in lots of
unexpected little shooty things.


Nick
[1]How can an apple tree be unwanted, you ask? When it is growing so
close to the bay tree that it gets no light or moisture and looks more
like a discarded clothes-line prop than a potential source of fruit.
John Ashby
2021-05-09 19:00:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Vicky Ayech
Here the rosemary and bay plants took over an area but b cut them
right back. In fact I'm worried the rosemary may never recover.
You are probably correct. Rosemary needs chopping back a bit every year. If
you cut back into last year's wood you'll lose the whole limb.
Oh dear :-( I've got a runaway rosemary bush that hasn't been
attended to in any way for several years. It seems to have inveigled
its way into everything around it. I was thinking about lopping it off
near the roots and waiting for new shoots to spring out but perhaps
that won't work after all.
I realise all plants are not the same but I devised the strategy after
my attempts to remove an unwanted apple tree[1] resulted in lots of
unexpected little shooty things.
Nick
[1]How can an apple tree be unwanted, you ask? When it is growing so
close to the bay tree that it gets no light or moisture and looks more
like a discarded clothes-line prop than a potential source of fruit.
Cut it back and take cuttings from the prunings.

Or take cuttings and leave the bush in until you're sure one has struck
when you can dig up and replace the bush.

john
Penny
2021-05-09 20:40:27 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 9 May 2021 20:00:10 +0100, John Ashby <***@yahoo.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by John Ashby
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Vicky Ayech
Here the rosemary and bay plants took over an area but b cut them
right back. In fact I'm worried the rosemary may never recover.
You are probably correct. Rosemary needs chopping back a bit every year. If
you cut back into last year's wood you'll lose the whole limb.
Oh dear :-( I've got a runaway rosemary bush that hasn't been
attended to in any way for several years. It seems to have inveigled
its way into everything around it. I was thinking about lopping it off
near the roots and waiting for new shoots to spring out but perhaps
that won't work after all.
Cut it back and take cuttings from the prunings.
Or take cuttings and leave the bush in until you're sure one has struck
when you can dig up and replace the bush.
That's what I always do with mine. Pull off some slips (side shoots with a
tale) and stick them in the ground nearby. Once established, remove
overgrown specimen.

I once stayed in an hotel in Mallorca which had a rosemary hedge - I
imagine maintaining that would require very careful management.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Nick Odell
2021-05-10 12:12:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by John Ashby
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Vicky Ayech
Here the rosemary and bay plants took over an area but b cut them
right back. In fact I'm worried the rosemary may never recover.
You are probably correct. Rosemary needs chopping back a bit every year. If
you cut back into last year's wood you'll lose the whole limb.
Oh dear :-( I've got a runaway rosemary bush that hasn't been
attended to in any way for several years. It seems to have inveigled
its way into everything around it. I was thinking about lopping it off
near the roots and waiting for new shoots to spring out but perhaps
that won't work after all.
I realise all plants are not the same but I devised the strategy after
my attempts to remove an unwanted apple tree[1] resulted in lots of
unexpected little shooty things.
Nick
[1]How can an apple tree be unwanted, you ask? When it is growing so
close to the bay tree that it gets no light or moisture and looks more
like a discarded clothes-line prop than a potential source of fruit.
Cut it back and take cuttings from the prunings.
Or take cuttings and leave the bush in until you're sure one has struck
when you can dig up and replace the bush.
Thanks, John (and Penny)
I'll give that a try

Nick
Kate B
2021-05-08 21:06:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Penny
the dust...
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Mike McMillan
Err……, that’s it really!
Speaking only for myself, sitting out in the sun, knitting.
I have wandered in a couple of times (by way of exercise!) and wondered
where everyrat was.
MTAAW
Sounds like more fun than lopping a sycamore which which was getting too
big for its boots - and the neighbour's mini-greenhouse.
Lopping the neighbour's mini-greenhouse doesn't sound very neighbourly...
I wasn't actually knitting in the sunshine but scrabbling about with a hand
fork trying to extract ivy from the ground and figure out just how wide the
path should really be. I also dug out a couple of huge cyclamen tubers
(without damaging them - the smell is weird if you stab them by mistake).
This is the 8th month of the war against ivy - little was done in the very
wet and very cold weather of the winter. Even in good weather efforts are
brief, I'm very unfit and lacking in stamina but it's good to see the
progress when I do manage to make any.
We too have an excess of ivy. In fact we always have an excess, but
this year it is even more excessive. We do tend to leave large amounts
of it untouched since the birds find it to be ideal nesting geography.
Cyclamen tubers do grow to great size - which is quite at odds with
those delicate little flowers.
The sycamore played the usual trick on me. Those small branches -
pretty trivial really - turn out to be quite substantial things when you
get up close and personal with them.
My relationship with plants is rather like that of a supply teacher to
a class: I very quickly get to know the names of the ones which cause
most trouble and never really remember the rest. Convolvulus!! Leave
Bay alone, will you? Etc. Etc. So I'm not sure what a cyclamen is.
(Ferrets a bit on Google....) Hmmm... They don't look that bad. Do
they go all triffidey if you turn your back on them for a few moments?
It may depend on how large your ant population is. Apparently the seeds
are spread by ants. We have lots of ants and cyclamen in our garden.
Every winter I buy some cyclamen for the balcony pots and every spring I
put them along the front of the borders, where they happily bed down.
But there are cyclamen in places I never put them too. Since they are
scented, spread happily underneath other things and come up in late
August when those other things are dying down, they are a welcome
addition. They are also surprisingly tough - they grow wild in the
garden in France and get regularly grubbed up by wild boar, and always
come back again in late summer.
--
Kate B
London
Sam Plusnet
2021-05-08 23:42:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kate B
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Penny
the dust...
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Penny
On Fri, 7 May 2021 13:21:16 +0100, Jenny M Benson
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Mike McMillan
Err……, that’s it really!
Speaking only for myself, sitting out in the sun, knitting.
I have wandered in a couple of times (by way of exercise!) and wondered
where everyrat was.
MTAAW
Sounds like more fun than lopping a sycamore which which was getting too
big for its boots - and the neighbour's mini-greenhouse.
Lopping the neighbour's mini-greenhouse doesn't sound very
neighbourly...
I wasn't actually knitting in the sunshine but scrabbling about with a hand
fork trying to extract ivy from the ground and figure out just how wide the
path should really be. I also dug out a couple of huge cyclamen tubers
(without damaging them - the smell is weird if you stab them by mistake).
This is the 8th month of the war against ivy - little was done in the very
wet and very cold weather of the winter. Even in good weather efforts are
brief, I'm very unfit and lacking in stamina but it's good to see the
progress when I do manage to make any.
We too have an excess of ivy.  In fact we always have an excess, but
this year it is even more excessive.  We do tend to leave large amounts
of it untouched since the birds find it to be ideal nesting geography.
Cyclamen tubers do grow to great size - which is quite at odds with
those delicate little flowers.
The sycamore played the usual trick on me.  Those small branches -
pretty trivial really - turn out to be quite substantial things when you
get up close and personal with them.
My relationship with plants is rather like that of a supply teacher to
a class: I very quickly get to know the names of the ones which cause
most trouble and never really remember the rest. Convolvulus!! Leave
Bay alone, will you? Etc. Etc. So I'm not sure what a cyclamen is.
(Ferrets a bit on Google....) Hmmm... They don't look that bad. Do
they go all triffidey if you turn your back on them for a few moments?
It may depend on how large your ant population is. Apparently the seeds
are spread by ants. We have lots of ants and cyclamen in our garden.
Every winter I buy some cyclamen for the balcony pots and every spring I
put them along the front of the borders, where they happily bed down.
But there are cyclamen in places I never put them too. Since they are
scented, spread happily underneath other things and come up in late
August when those other things are dying down, they are a welcome
addition. They are also surprisingly tough - they grow wild in the
garden in France and get regularly grubbed up by wild boar, and always
come back again in late summer.
Are there any other plants which form their flower stems like tightly
coiled springs? That part always seems very unlikely to me, like Nature
playing a joke on gullible people.
--
Sam Plusnet
Joe Kerr
2021-05-08 21:16:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Penny
the dust...
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Mike McMillan
Err……, that’s it really!
Speaking only for myself, sitting out in the sun, knitting.
I have wandered in a couple of times (by way of exercise!) and wondered
where everyrat was.
MTAAW
Sounds like more fun than lopping a sycamore which which was getting too
big for its boots - and the neighbour's mini-greenhouse.
Lopping the neighbour's mini-greenhouse doesn't sound very neighbourly...
I wasn't actually knitting in the sunshine but scrabbling about with a hand
fork trying to extract ivy from the ground and figure out just how wide the
path should really be. I also dug out a couple of huge cyclamen tubers
(without damaging them - the smell is weird if you stab them by mistake).
This is the 8th month of the war against ivy - little was done in the very
wet and very cold weather of the winter. Even in good weather efforts are
brief, I'm very unfit and lacking in stamina but it's good to see the
progress when I do manage to make any.
We too have an excess of ivy. In fact we always have an excess, but
this year it is even more excessive. We do tend to leave large amounts
of it untouched since the birds find it to be ideal nesting geography.
Cyclamen tubers do grow to great size - which is quite at odds with
those delicate little flowers.
The sycamore played the usual trick on me. Those small branches -
pretty trivial really - turn out to be quite substantial things when you
get up close and personal with them.
My relationship with plants is rather like that of a supply teacher to
a class: I very quickly get to know the names of the ones which cause
most trouble and never really remember the rest. Convolvulus!! Leave
Bay alone, will you? Etc. Etc. So I'm not sure what a cyclamen is.
I think Cyclamen were featured in a story or two on Dr Who.
Post by Nick Odell
(Ferrets a bit on Google....) Hmmm... They don't look that bad. Do
they go all triffidey if you turn your back on them for a few moments?
My mother had 3 or 4 of them in the front garden. They are adept at self
seeding. She now has a whole swathe of them in the front garden. And in
the front lawn. And a fair few in the back garden.
Post by Nick Odell
Nick
--
Ric
Penny
2021-05-08 22:44:13 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 08 May 2021 21:09:50 +0100, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
I'm not sure what a cyclamen is.
(Ferrets a bit on Google....) Hmmm... They don't look that bad. Do
they go all triffidey if you turn your back on them for a few moments?
Not at all - they are lovely! The flowers are pretty (I have red, pink and
white all over the garden) and their leaves are very decorative when the
flowers aren't there. The tubers I hoiked out are the size of my fist and
were probably fine right next to the path when they first appeared, the
size of a marble or less. The size of the leaves seems to reflect the size
of the tuber - I'll find a spot higher up the bank for them, once I've got
the ivy out.

Convolvulus was my target a few years ago - probably time I had another go
at that, along with the cleavers which went bonkers a couple of years back.
Then there is the herb bennett which I've been fighting for ten years...
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Mike McMillan
2021-05-09 07:25:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Sat, 08 May 2021 21:09:50 +0100, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
I'm not sure what a cyclamen is.
(Ferrets a bit on Google....) Hmmm... They don't look that bad. Do
they go all triffidey if you turn your back on them for a few moments?
Not at all - they are lovely! The flowers are pretty (I have red, pink and
white all over the garden) and their leaves are very decorative when the
flowers aren't there. The tubers I hoiked out are the size of my fist and
were probably fine right next to the path when they first appeared, the
size of a marble or less. The size of the leaves seems to reflect the size
of the tuber - I'll find a spot higher up the bank for them, once I've got
the ivy out.
Convolvulus was my target a few years ago - probably time I had another go
at that, along with the cleavers which went bonkers a couple of years back.
Then there is the herb bennett which I've been fighting for ten years...
Why not set the Cleavers onto the Convolvulus and ask Gordon to sort out
the Bennett?
--
Toodle Pip (My other iPad is an old Pro)
Jenny M Benson
2021-05-09 09:06:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
Convolvulus was my target a few years ago - probably time I had another go
at that, along with the cleavers which went bonkers a couple of years back.
Then there is the herb bennett which I've been fighting for ten years...
My daughter's bother-in-law told me a couple of days ago that bleach is
an excellent weedkiller. He said it even kills off Mare's Tail - I wish
I'd known that a few years ago when I was doing futile battle with the
stuff.
--
Jenny M Benson
Chris
2021-05-09 16:51:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Penny
Convolvulus was my target a few years ago - probably time I had another go
at that, along with the cleavers which went bonkers a couple of years back.
Then there is the herb bennett which I've been fighting for ten years...
My daughter's bother-in-law told me a couple of days ago that bleach is
an excellent weedkiller. He said it even kills off Mare's Tail - I wish
I'd known that a few years ago when I was doing futile battle with the
stuff.
These rats would like to know a lot more- mare’s tail is not our best
friend.

Sincerely Chris
Jenny M Benson
2021-05-09 21:06:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chris
Post by Jenny M Benson
My daughter's bother-in-law told me a couple of days ago that bleach is
an excellent weedkiller. He said it even kills off Mare's Tail - I wish
I'd known that a few years ago when I was doing futile battle with the
stuff.
These rats would like to know a lot more- mare’s tail is not our best
friend.
I did think afterwards that I should have asked if the bleach was
applied neat or at what dilution. I will probably see him to-morrow and
will ask.
--
Jenny M Benson
Mike McMillan
2021-05-10 07:15:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Chris
Post by Jenny M Benson
My daughter's bother-in-law told me a couple of days ago that bleach is
an excellent weedkiller. He said it even kills off Mare's Tail - I wish
I'd known that a few years ago when I was doing futile battle with the
stuff.
These rats would like to know a lot more- mare’s tail is not our best
friend.
I did think afterwards that I should have asked if the bleach was
applied neat or at what dilution. I will probably see him to-morrow and
will ask.
Ta muchly.
--
Toodle Pip (My other iPad is an old Pro)
Jenny M Benson
2021-05-10 09:23:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Chris
Post by Jenny M Benson
My daughter's bother-in-law told me a couple of days ago that bleach is
an excellent weedkiller. He said it even kills off Mare's Tail - I wish
I'd known that a few years ago when I was doing futile battle with the
stuff.
These rats would like to know a lot more- mare’s tail is not our best
friend.
I did think afterwards that I should have asked if the bleach was
applied neat or at what dilution. I will probably see him to-morrow and
will ask.
Ta muchly.
He says you could dilute it, but for Mare's Tail better spray it on neat.
--
Jenny M Benson
BrritSki
2021-05-10 09:27:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
I did think afterwards that I should have asked if the bleach was
applied neat or at what dilution.  I will probably see him to-morrow and
will ask.
He says you could dilute it, but for Mare's Tail better spray it on neat.
The neats will not like that. It will turn their feet to jelly.
Mike McMillan
2021-05-10 14:54:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by BrritSki
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
I did think afterwards that I should have asked if the bleach was
applied neat or at what dilution.  I will probably see him to-morrow and
will ask.
He says you could dilute it, but for Mare's Tail better spray it on neat.
The neats will not like that. It will turn their feet to jelly.
But they will be able to turn a clean heel.;-)))
--
Toodle Pip (My other iPad is an old Pro)
Mike McMillan
2021-05-10 14:56:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by BrritSki
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
I did think afterwards that I should have asked if the bleach was
applied neat or at what dilution.  I will probably see him to-morrow and
will ask.
He says you could dilute it, but for Mare's Tail better spray it on neat.
The neats will not like that. It will turn their feet to jelly.
But they will be able to turn a clean heel.;-)))
Actually, some years ago, I had some neatsfoot oil for rubbing into my bike
saddle.
--
Toodle Pip (My other iPad is an old Pro)
Mike McMillan
2021-05-10 14:53:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Chris
Post by Jenny M Benson
My daughter's bother-in-law told me a couple of days ago that bleach is
an excellent weedkiller. He said it even kills off Mare's Tail - I wish
I'd known that a few years ago when I was doing futile battle with the
stuff.
These rats would like to know a lot more- mare’s tail is not our best
friend.
I did think afterwards that I should have asked if the bleach was
applied neat or at what dilution. I will probably see him to-morrow and
will ask.
Ta muchly.
He says you could dilute it, but for Mare's Tail better spray it on neat.
Thank you most sincerely Umrat, duly noted; we have a ‘leakproof’ hand
sprayer on order which may well find itself being used for such a task in
the VNF.;-)))
--
Toodle Pip (My other iPad is an old Pro)
Jenny M Benson
2021-05-10 15:36:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike McMillan
Thank you most sincerely Umrat, duly noted; we have a ‘leakproof’ hand
sprayer on order which may well find itself being used for such a task in
the VNF.;-)))
My daughter has just told me to tell you to get 2 piece of wood and use
them to bash the Mare's Tail between them to bruise it before spraying
to stop the liquid just running off.
--
Jenny M Benson
BrritSki
2021-05-10 16:12:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Mike McMillan
Thank you most sincerely Umrat, duly noted; we have a ‘leakproof’ hand
sprayer on order which may well find itself being used for such a task in
the VNF.;-)))
My daughter has just told me to tell you to get 2 piece of wood and use
them to bash the Mare's Tail between them to bruise it before spraying
to stop the liquid just running off.
Does it hurt ?
Only if you get your fingers caught..

IGMcamelhairC
Mike McMillan
2021-05-10 16:29:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by BrritSki
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Mike McMillan
Thank you most sincerely Umrat, duly noted; we have a ‘leakproof’ hand
sprayer on order which may well find itself being used for such a task in
the VNF.;-)))
My daughter has just told me to tell you to get 2 piece of wood and use
them to bash the Mare's Tail between them to bruise it before spraying
to stop the liquid just running off.
Does it hurt ?
Only if you get your fingers caught..
IGMcamelhairC
‘Onestly BrritSki, I had posted my previous response before reading your
comment:-)))
--
Toodle Pip (My other iPad is an old Pro)
Mike McMillan
2021-05-10 16:27:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Mike McMillan
Thank you most sincerely Umrat, duly noted; we have a ‘leakproof’ hand
sprayer on order which may well find itself being used for such a task in
the VNF.;-)))
My daughter has just told me to tell you to get 2 piece of wood and use
them to bash the Mare's Tail between them to bruise it before spraying
to stop the liquid just running off.
Ooooh! That will be very gratifying to do - I absolutely (love [not!]) MT
so administering some gentle ‘massage’ with a couple of 4” x 2” (only hand
powered, no motor drive involved) timbers to bruise them will be a delight.
(Did I ever tell you how to convert a 14 day camel into a 21 day one?;-)))
)
--
Toodle Pip (My other iPad is an old Pro)
Sam Plusnet
2021-05-10 19:21:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Mike McMillan
Thank you most sincerely Umrat, duly noted; we have a ‘leakproof’ hand
sprayer on order which may well find itself being used for such a task in
the VNF.;-)))
My daughter has just told me to tell you to get 2 piece of wood and use
them to bash the Mare's Tail between them to bruise it before spraying
to stop the liquid just running off.
Ooooh! That will be very gratifying to do - I absolutely (love [not!]) MT
so administering some gentle ‘massage’ with a couple of 4” x 2” (only hand
powered, no motor drive involved) timbers to bruise them will be a delight.
(Did I ever tell you how to convert a 14 day camel into a 21 day one?;-)))
)
No timber required.
Just do a Slavonian Stomping Dance in suitable footwear. If the
neighbours come out to question your sanity, persuade them to join in.
--
Sam Plusnet
Chris
2021-05-10 17:25:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Chris
Post by Jenny M Benson
My daughter's bother-in-law told me a couple of days ago that bleach is
an excellent weedkiller. He said it even kills off Mare's Tail - I wish
I'd known that a few years ago when I was doing futile battle with the
stuff.
These rats would like to know a lot more- mare’s tail is not our best
friend.
I did think afterwards that I should have asked if the bleach was
applied neat or at what dilution. I will probably see him to-morrow and
will ask.
Ta muchly.
He says you could dilute it, but for Mare's Tail better spray it on neat.
Thank you most sincerely Umrat, duly noted; we have a ‘leakproof’ hand
sprayer on order which may well find itself being used for such a task in
the VNF.;-)))
Bindweed already racing across the greenhouse floor and I need to pot on
and send the first showings out of their heated nursery to the floor space.
Safer there for my watering than on the shelving. Just need the pesky wind
to die down.

Sincerely Chris
Sam Plusnet
2021-05-10 19:22:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chris
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Chris
Post by Jenny M Benson
My daughter's bother-in-law told me a couple of days ago that bleach is
an excellent weedkiller. He said it even kills off Mare's Tail - I wish
I'd known that a few years ago when I was doing futile battle with the
stuff.
These rats would like to know a lot more- mare’s tail is not our best
friend.
I did think afterwards that I should have asked if the bleach was
applied neat or at what dilution. I will probably see him to-morrow and
will ask.
Ta muchly.
He says you could dilute it, but for Mare's Tail better spray it on neat.
Thank you most sincerely Umrat, duly noted; we have a ‘leakproof’ hand
sprayer on order which may well find itself being used for such a task in
the VNF.;-)))
Bindweed already racing across the greenhouse floor and I need to pot on
and send the first showings out of their heated nursery to the floor space.
Safer there for my watering than on the shelving. Just need the pesky wind
to die down.
Definitely wait for the wind to die down before spraying outdoors -
especially bleach.
--
Sam Plusnet
John Ashby
2021-05-10 19:29:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Chris
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Chris
Post by Jenny M Benson
My daughter's bother-in-law told me a couple of days ago that bleach is
an excellent weedkiller.  He said it even kills off Mare's Tail
- I wish
I'd known that a few years ago when I was doing futile battle with the
stuff.
These rats would like to know a lot more- mare’s tail is not our best
friend.
I did think afterwards that I should have asked if the bleach was
applied neat or at what dilution.  I will probably see him
to-morrow and
will ask.
Ta muchly.
He says you could dilute it, but for Mare's Tail better spray it on neat.
Thank you most sincerely Umrat, duly noted; we have a ‘leakproof’ hand
sprayer on order which may well find itself being used for such a task in
the VNF.;-)))
Bindweed already racing across the greenhouse floor and I need to pot on
and send the first showings out of their heated nursery to the floor space.
Safer there for my watering than on the shelving.  Just need the pesky
wind
to die down.
Definitely wait for the wind to die down before spraying outdoors -
especially bleach.
Or you could go all Sissinghurst and have a White Garden.

john
Chris
2021-05-10 17:15:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Chris
Post by Jenny M Benson
My daughter's bother-in-law told me a couple of days ago that bleach is
an excellent weedkiller. He said it even kills off Mare's Tail - I wish
I'd known that a few years ago when I was doing futile battle with the
stuff.
These rats would like to know a lot more- mare’s tail is not our best
friend.
I did think afterwards that I should have asked if the bleach was
applied neat or at what dilution. I will probably see him to-morrow and
will ask.
Ta muchly.
He says you could dilute it, but for Mare's Tail better spray it on neat.
Thanks Jenny!

Sincerely Chris
Chris
2021-05-10 19:46:45 UTC
Permalink
Dreadful epi but it was worth hearing Brine and Aliss in the final scene.
How Oi larfed.

Sincerely Chris
Vicky Ayech
2021-05-10 20:55:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chris
Dreadful epi but it was worth hearing Brine and Aliss in the final scene.
How Oi larfed.
Sincerely Chris
I didn't laugh. Just thought 'oh dear'. :(

S
p
o
i
l
e
r
s
p
o
i
l
e
r
Most of the way through I was wondering why Susan and Neil were not
getting Jenefer, who does not have a full-time job, to do some of the
baby-sitting. But she doesn't know it is needed. Is Alice just
staying home and drinking? It looks from spoilers for tomorrow as if
we get other story lines and no more information for now.
Mike McMillan
2021-05-11 07:35:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by Chris
Dreadful epi but it was worth hearing Brine and Aliss in the final scene.
How Oi larfed.
Sincerely Chris
I didn't laugh. Just thought 'oh dear'. :(
S
p
o
i
l
e
r
s
p
o
i
l
e
r
Most of the way through I was wondering why Susan and Neil were not
getting Jenefer, who does not have a full-time job, to do some of the
baby-sitting. But she doesn't know it is needed. Is Alice just
staying home and drinking? It looks from spoilers for tomorrow as if
we get other story lines and no more information for now.
Oh Good!
--
Toodle Pip (My other iPad is an old Pro)
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2021-05-10 17:19:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
My daughter's bother-in-law told me a couple of days ago that bleach is
an excellent weedkiller. He said it even kills off Mare's Tail - I wish
I'd known that a few years ago when I was doing futile battle with the
stuff.
I found sodium chlorate (basically a white powder, looks a lot like
salt; you dissolve it in water to apply) an excellent weedkiller; not
only does it seem to kill everything green, but they _stay_ dead for
many weeks (I'd say about three months).

Then the EU banned it. IIRR, "because it stays in the soil" - fine by
me, that's what I _want_ from a weedkiller! The alleged alternatives -
promoted under assorted commercial names, but basically all glyphosate
(that bugs me too: I want to buy the generic, but nowhere sells it) -
have some effect, but it doesn't last anything like as long.

I haven't tried bleach.
[]
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Jenny M Benson
I did think afterwards that I should have asked if the bleach was
applied neat or at what dilution. I will probably see him to-morrow and
will ask.
Check with the container: it's almost certainly already _been_ diluted.
For example, the bottle under my sink says - in tiny print, and under
"Product safety instructions" - "Contains less than 5% chlorine based
bleaching agent and disinfectant (Sodium Hypochlorite)." Granted, it's
an economy one, but I doubt even a posh "thick" one will be more than
(if as much as) 20%. [I don't know what the other 95+% is - water, I
guess.]
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Mike McMillan
Ta muchly.
He says you could dilute it, but for Mare's Tail better spray it on neat.
With a syringe, maybe?
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

There's never enough time to do all the nothing you want.
CALVIN AND HOBBES, according to a @qikipedia tweet 2019-9-9.
Mike Ruddock
2021-05-10 19:00:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
My daughter's bother-in-law told me a couple of days ago that bleach is
an excellent weedkiller.  He said it even kills off Mare's Tail -
I wish
I'd known that a few years ago when I was doing futile battle with the
stuff.
I found sodium chlorate (basically a white powder, looks a lot like
salt; you dissolve it in water to apply) an excellent weedkiller; not
only does it seem to kill everything green, but they _stay_ dead for
many weeks (I'd say about three months).
Then the EU banned it. IIRR, "because it stays in the soil" - fine by
me, that's what I _want_ from a weedkiller! The alleged alternatives -
promoted under assorted commercial names, but basically all glyphosate
(that bugs me too: I want to buy the generic, but nowhere sells it) -
have some effect, but it doesn't last anything like as long.
I haven't tried bleach.
[]
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
I did think afterwards that I should have asked if the bleach was
applied neat or at what dilution.  I will probably see him to-morrow
and
will ask.
Check with the container: it's almost certainly already _been_ diluted.
For example, the bottle under my sink says - in tiny print, and under
"Product safety instructions" - "Contains less than 5% chlorine based
bleaching agent and disinfectant (Sodium Hypochlorite)." Granted, it's
an economy one, but I doubt even a posh "thick" one will be more than
(if as much as) 20%. [I don't know what the other 95+% is - water, I
guess.]
Post by Jenny M Benson
 Ta muchly.
He says you could dilute it, but for Mare's Tail better spray it on neat.
With a syringe, maybe?
I thought Sodium Chlorate was banned because it is a componernt of an
easy to make explosive.
Mike Ruddock
Sam Plusnet
2021-05-10 19:26:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike Ruddock
On Mon, 10 May 2021 at 10:23:28, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
My daughter's bother-in-law told me a couple of days ago that bleach is
an excellent weedkiller.  He said it even kills off Mare's Tail -
I wish
I'd known that a few years ago when I was doing futile battle with the
stuff.
I found sodium chlorate (basically a white powder, looks a lot like
salt; you dissolve it in water to apply) an excellent weedkiller; not
only does it seem to kill everything green, but they _stay_ dead for
many weeks (I'd say about three months).
Then the EU banned it. IIRR, "because it stays in the soil" - fine by
me, that's what I _want_ from a weedkiller! The alleged alternatives -
promoted under assorted commercial names, but basically all glyphosate
(that bugs me too: I want to buy the generic, but nowhere sells it) -
have some effect, but it doesn't last anything like as long.
I haven't tried bleach.
[]
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
I did think afterwards that I should have asked if the bleach was
applied neat or at what dilution.  I will probably see him
to-morrow and
will ask.
Check with the container: it's almost certainly already _been_
diluted. For example, the bottle under my sink says - in tiny print,
and under "Product safety instructions" - "Contains less than 5%
chlorine based bleaching agent and disinfectant (Sodium
Hypochlorite)." Granted, it's an economy one, but I doubt even a posh
"thick" one will be more than (if as much as) 20%. [I don't know what
the other 95+% is - water, I guess.]
Post by Jenny M Benson
 Ta muchly.
He says you could dilute it, but for Mare's Tail better spray it on neat.
With a syringe, maybe?
I thought Sodium Chlorate was banned because it is a componernt of an
easy to make explosive.
It was, but it remained on the market for commercial use[1] - which is
the sort of quantity that people of ill will would try to acquire.

[1] Years ago, I'm sure it all changed at some point.
--
Sam Plusnet
Nick Odell
2021-05-10 20:10:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Mike Ruddock
On Mon, 10 May 2021 at 10:23:28, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
My daughter's bother-in-law told me a couple of days ago that bleach is
an excellent weedkiller.  He said it even kills off Mare's Tail -
I wish
I'd known that a few years ago when I was doing futile battle with the
stuff.
I found sodium chlorate (basically a white powder, looks a lot like
salt; you dissolve it in water to apply) an excellent weedkiller; not
only does it seem to kill everything green, but they _stay_ dead for
many weeks (I'd say about three months).
Then the EU banned it. IIRR, "because it stays in the soil" - fine by
me, that's what I _want_ from a weedkiller! The alleged alternatives -
promoted under assorted commercial names, but basically all glyphosate
(that bugs me too: I want to buy the generic, but nowhere sells it) -
have some effect, but it doesn't last anything like as long.
I haven't tried bleach.
[]
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
I did think afterwards that I should have asked if the bleach was
applied neat or at what dilution.  I will probably see him
to-morrow and
will ask.
Check with the container: it's almost certainly already _been_
diluted. For example, the bottle under my sink says - in tiny print,
and under "Product safety instructions" - "Contains less than 5%
chlorine based bleaching agent and disinfectant (Sodium
Hypochlorite)." Granted, it's an economy one, but I doubt even a posh
"thick" one will be more than (if as much as) 20%. [I don't know what
the other 95+% is - water, I guess.]
Post by Jenny M Benson
 Ta muchly.
He says you could dilute it, but for Mare's Tail better spray it on neat.
With a syringe, maybe?
I thought Sodium Chlorate was banned because it is a componernt of an
easy to make explosive.
It was, but it remained on the market for commercial use[1] - which is
the sort of quantity that people of ill will would try to acquire.
[1] Years ago, I'm sure it all changed at some point.
I thought they put an inhibitor in it?

I've got a tub of the pre-inhibitor stuff under the...

Oi? Who's that banging on my front do..?
Penny
2021-05-10 20:35:13 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 10 May 2021 18:19:40 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I found sodium chlorate (basically a white powder, looks a lot like
salt; you dissolve it in water to apply) an excellent weedkiller; not
only does it seem to kill everything green, but they _stay_ dead for
many weeks (I'd say about three months).
I believe it hangs around longer than that - I may still have some
somewhere...
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Then the EU banned it. IIRR, "because it stays in the soil" - fine by
me, that's what I _want_ from a weedkiller! The alleged alternatives -
promoted under assorted commercial names, but basically all glyphosate
(that bugs me too: I want to buy the generic, but nowhere sells it) -
have some effect, but it doesn't last anything like as long.
I had little trouble buying a big box of generic glyphosate. I dilute it as
advised on the box and use it in a big pump sprayer. If your local garden
centre doesn't have it, you can probably buy it online. A quick search
shows the Bayer Garden version I bought - powder in a cardboard box for
about £14 - is no longer available (it's lasted me a long time) though some
folk still show it as 'out of stock'. It says it contains 27 g/l tallow
alkylamine ethoxylate and will treat 440sq.m (in case that helps you
choose).

Which makes this look like good value
<https://www.therange.co.uk/garden/pest-control-and-weed-killer/weed-killer/glyphosate-weedkiller-concentrate/>
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Chris
2021-05-10 17:15:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Chris
Post by Jenny M Benson
My daughter's bother-in-law told me a couple of days ago that bleach is
an excellent weedkiller. He said it even kills off Mare's Tail - I wish
I'd known that a few years ago when I was doing futile battle with the
stuff.
These rats would like to know a lot more- mare’s tail is not our best
friend.
I did think afterwards that I should have asked if the bleach was
applied neat or at what dilution. I will probably see him to-morrow and
will ask.
Yes please, Jenny!!

Sincerely Chris
steve hague
2021-05-09 06:47:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
My relationship with plants is rather like that of a supply teacher to
a class: I very quickly get to know the names of the ones which cause
most trouble and never really remember the rest. Convolvulus!! Leave
Bay alone, will you? Etc. Etc. So I'm not sure what a cyclamen is.
(Ferrets a bit on Google....) Hmmm... They don't look that bad. Do
they go all triffidey if you turn your back on them for a few moments?
Nick
About five years ago a few small shiny gren leafed plant appeared in our
small front garden. It was quite attractive, but grew and spread
rapidly, but I hadn't a clue what it was. I posted a description on
umra, and was told it was acanthus. Every year I chop it down to ground
level, and even uproot much of it. Within a few weeks, it's back. This
happens whatever time of year I do it. Last year I did it in October,
and it was back for Christmas.
Steve
Penny
2021-05-09 07:38:32 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 9 May 2021 07:47:35 +0100, steve hague <***@gmail.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by steve hague
About five years ago a few small shiny gren leafed plant appeared in our
small front garden. It was quite attractive, but grew and spread
rapidly, but I hadn't a clue what it was. I posted a description on
umra, and was told it was acanthus. Every year I chop it down to ground
level, and even uproot much of it. Within a few weeks, it's back. This
happens whatever time of year I do it. Last year I did it in October,
and it was back for Christmas.
At least you know its name... ;)
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
John Ashby
2021-05-09 19:02:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by steve hague
Post by Nick Odell
My relationship with plants is rather like that of a supply teacher to
a class: I very quickly get to know the names of the ones which cause
most trouble and never really remember the rest. Convolvulus!! Leave
Bay alone, will you? Etc. Etc. So I'm not sure what a cyclamen is.
(Ferrets a bit on Google....) Hmmm... They don't look that bad. Do
they go all triffidey if you turn your back on them for a few moments?
Nick
About five years ago a few small shiny gren leafed plant appeared in our
small front garden. It was quite attractive, but grew and spread
rapidly, but I hadn't a clue what it was. I posted a description on
umra, and was told it was acanthus. Every year I chop it down to ground
level, and even uproot much of it. Within a few weeks, it's back. This
happens whatever time of year I do it. Last year I did it in October,
and it was back for Christmas.
Steve
A canthus is not just for Christmas.

john
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2021-05-10 17:02:50 UTC
Permalink
[]
Post by John Ashby
Post by steve hague
About five years ago a few small shiny gren leafed plant appeared in
our small front garden. It was quite attractive, but grew and spread
rapidly, but I hadn't a clue what it was. I posted a description on
umra, and was told it was acanthus. Every year I chop it down to
ground level, and even uproot much of it. Within a few weeks, it's
back. This happens whatever time of year I do it. Last year I did it
in October, and it was back for Christmas.
Steve
A canthus is not just for Christmas.
john
GROAN! Excellent.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

There's never enough time to do all the nothing you want.
CALVIN AND HOBBES, according to a @qikipedia tweet 2019-9-9.
krw
2021-05-07 15:32:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike McMillan
Err……, that’s it really!
Out to lunch. Mussels followed by fish and chips.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
BrritSki
2021-05-07 15:36:31 UTC
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Post by Mike McMillan
Err……, that’s it really!
Out to lunch.  Mussels followed by fish and chips.
Wallpapering over cracks in Hartlepool...
steve hague
2021-05-07 19:23:58 UTC
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Post by Mike McMillan
Err……, that’s it really!
Out to lunch.  Mussels followed by fish and chips.
Mussels and fish and chips for lunch? Mussels with fresh crusty bread
make a good lunch, but I couldn't face fish and chips for several hours
afterwards, despite the fact that we live a few hundred yards from
possibly the best chip shop on the planet. My appetite is not what it was.
Steve
Vicky Ayech
2021-05-07 20:42:50 UTC
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On Fri, 7 May 2021 20:23:58 +0100, steve hague
Post by steve hague
Err……, that’s it really!
Out to lunch.  Mussels followed by fish and chips.
Mussels and fish and chips for lunch? Mussels with fresh crusty bread
make a good lunch, but I couldn't face fish and chips for several hours
afterwards, despite the fact that we live a few hundred yards from
possibly the best chip shop on the planet. My appetite is not what it was.
Steve
I can't eat as much now either. Sad!
krw
2021-05-07 21:36:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by steve hague
Post by Mike McMillan
Err……, that’s it really!
Out to lunch.  Mussels followed by fish and chips.
Mussels and fish and chips for lunch? Mussels with fresh crusty bread
make a good lunch, but I couldn't face fish and chips for several hours
afterwards, despite the fact that we live a few hundred yards from
possibly the best chip shop on the planet. My appetite is not what it was.
Steve
I was rather full too. I had not anticipated the portion size for the
mussels. In retrospect I could have had a small scotch egg followed by
the mussels and some chips.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Joe Kerr
2021-05-07 19:44:35 UTC
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Post by Mike McMillan
Err……, that’s it really!
oh, sorry Mike. Didn't you see me standing here?
--
Ric
Vicky Ayech
2021-05-07 20:43:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by Joe Kerr
Err……, that’s it really!
oh, sorry Mike. Didn't you see me standing here?
I was here too but a non-speaking umrat.
Peter
2021-05-10 16:34:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike McMillan
Err……, that’s it really!
Everybody, with a very few exceptions, is in the earth's biosphere. The
few exception are those in the international space station.
--
Just as 'beautiful' points the way for aesthetics and 'good' for ethics,
so do words like 'true' for logic. All sciences have truth as their
goal; but logic is also concerned with it in a quite different way:
logic has much the same relation to truth as physics has to weight or
heat. Frege in 'Thoughts' (Der Gedanke)
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