Discussion:
Sir Lenworth George Henry vs. Robert Allen Zimmerman, Nobel laureate
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Peter
2021-05-30 14:41:47 UTC
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I'm on Sir Lenworth's side.
--
Just as 'beautiful' points the way for aesthetics and 'good' for ethics,
so do words like 'true' for logic. All sciences have truth as their
goal; but logic is also concerned with it in a quite different way:
logic has much the same relation to truth as physics has to weight or
heat. Frege in 'Thoughts' (Der Gedanke)
Sid Nuncius
2021-05-30 18:43:07 UTC
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Post by Peter
I'm on Sir Lenworth's side.
I assume you're referring to this:
https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00c7fbx

I think Sir Len has a point about the whine and the grating music. I
also think that a significant proportion of Dylan's output is a long way
short of great. (For example, those two albums of The Great American
Songbook are simply painful, IMO, and I've not found much of interest in
his work for about 40 years.)

However, Dylan captured the mood and attitudes of a generation in the
60s in a way almost no-one else ever has, I would suggest, and that
whine and grating style was a part of its expression. He has also
written some simply magnificent songs, IMO. He has (or, more
accurately, had) an ability to use language in obscure but
extraordinarily evocative ways which somehow often got to the heart of
things even though, in the cold light of day and subject to rational
analysis, meaning was elusive. I would cite Ballad Of A Thin Man and
its attack on the press as just one example.

He was sometimes very direct, too - Like A Rolling Stone (also from
Highway 61 Revisited, possibly my favourite Dylan album) and Hurricane,
for example, pull no punches, and Sarah is simply a beautiful love song.

He has left an indelible mark in music, both directly and indirectly,
for decades. I saw a "virtual concert" during lockdown involving three
current singer-songwriters. The great (and I do not use that word idly
here) Chris Smither played a cracking version of Visions Of Johanna and
afterward one of the others, obviously jokingly, said "I must look into
more of his work." Smither acknowledged the joke, but added, "If it
weren't for him none of us would ever have written a song."

I can understand why some people don't like his music, and I think the
hagiographical view some take of him is plain silly, but given his
colossal influence and the fact that his music is woven into the
metaphorical bones of a lot of people (including me) shurely make it
hard to argue against him being great, even if you don't like his music.

And personally I'd have awarded him the Nobel Prize just for the line
"The ghost of electricity howls in the bones of her face." :o)

Just my two riders approaching worth.
--
Sid
(Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Sid Nuncius
2021-05-30 18:56:23 UTC
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Post by Sid Nuncius
I saw a "virtual concert" during lockdown involving three
current singer-songwriters.  The great (and I do not use that word idly
here) Chris Smither played a cracking version of Visions Of Johanna and
afterward one of the others, obviously jokingly, said "I must look into
more of his work."  Smither acknowledged the joke, but added, "If it
weren't for him none of us would ever have written a song."
If anyone's interested, that concert is still available:
https://www.greennote.co.uk/production/chris-smither-peter-mulvey-the-suitcase-junket/
Visions Of Johanna (arranged in 3/4 time) is at around 1hr,10min and
worth a few minutes of anyone's time, IMO. I find I have paraphrased
the exchange afterward a little, but I've caught the the gist.

(It's free to watch. I paid to watch the original live stream, and I'm
sure that will also include any umrats who want to hear that song.)
--
Sid
(Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Vicky Ayech
2021-05-30 20:52:17 UTC
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On Sun, 30 May 2021 19:56:23 +0100, Sid Nuncius
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Sid Nuncius
I saw a "virtual concert" during lockdown involving three
current singer-songwriters.  The great (and I do not use that word idly
here) Chris Smither played a cracking version of Visions Of Johanna and
afterward one of the others, obviously jokingly, said "I must look into
more of his work."  Smither acknowledged the joke, but added, "If it
weren't for him none of us would ever have written a song."
https://www.greennote.co.uk/production/chris-smither-peter-mulvey-the-suitcase-junket/
Visions Of Johanna (arranged in 3/4 time) is at around 1hr,10min and
worth a few minutes of anyone's time, IMO. I find I have paraphrased
the exchange afterward a little, but I've caught the the gist.
(It's free to watch. I paid to watch the original live stream, and I'm
sure that will also include any umrats who want to hear that song.)
He came along when I was a teenager

Come Mothers and fathers throughout all the land
And don't criticize what you don't understand

pretty much spoke for that generation
I've maybe not liked all of them since but am still a fan. I saw him
live at Wembly Arena and also saw the film at the BFI. Most types of
music and poetry have their detractors. And I like his voice too :)
Min
2021-05-30 23:35:28 UTC
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Post by Vicky Ayech
On Sun, 30 May 2021 19:56:23 +0100, Sid Nuncius
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Sid Nuncius
I saw a "virtual concert" during lockdown involving three
current singer-songwriters. The great (and I do not use that word idly
here) Chris Smither played a cracking version of Visions Of Johanna and
afterward one of the others, obviously jokingly, said "I must look into
more of his work." Smither acknowledged the joke, but added, "If it
weren't for him none of us would ever have written a song."
https://www.greennote.co.uk/production/chris-smither-peter-mulvey-the-suitcase-junket/
Visions Of Johanna (arranged in 3/4 time) is at around 1hr,10min and
worth a few minutes of anyone's time, IMO. I find I have paraphrased
the exchange afterward a little, but I've caught the the gist.
(It's free to watch. I paid to watch the original live stream, and I'm
sure that will also include any umrats who want to hear that song.)
He came along when I was a teenager
Come Mothers and fathers throughout all the land
And don't criticize what you don't understand
pretty much spoke for that generation
I've maybe not liked all of them since but am still a fan. I saw him
live at Wembly Arena and also saw the film at the BFI. Most types of
music and poetry have their detractors. And I like his voice too :)
If Sir Lenworth George Henry is dissing his Bobness, I have no
interest in perusing it. I have recently read some novels about
a Dylan-obsessed DI by a Douglas Lindsay. Not an easy read by
any means - said DI is a suicidal alcoholic sex-addicted
PTSD-sufferer. But well worth a read for the non-squeamish.
--
Min
Nick Odell
2021-05-31 08:10:29 UTC
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On Sun, 30 May 2021 16:35:28 -0700 (PDT), Min
<***@googlemail.com> wrote:
<snip>
...a suicidal alcoholic sex-addicted PTSD-sufferer...
If that's not a line from Dylan, it must have come from AL Kennedy.

(Was the recent R4Extra repeat of Subterranean Homesick Blues part of
the BBC Dylan at 80 series or just random programming?)

Nick
Vicky Ayech
2021-05-31 15:48:04 UTC
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On Mon, 31 May 2021 09:10:29 +0100, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
On Sun, 30 May 2021 16:35:28 -0700 (PDT), Min
<snip>
...a suicidal alcoholic sex-addicted PTSD-sufferer...
If that's not a line from Dylan, it must have come from AL Kennedy.
(Was the recent R4Extra repeat of Subterranean Homesick Blues part of
the BBC Dylan at 80 series or just random programming?)
Nick
I'm just watching Don't Look Back. Tiny kf.
About 12 minutes in the man from BBC African Service interviews him,
with less stupid questions than some previous ones they show. Then the
credits run for that and the producer was Colin Wild. I worked for
him about 5 years later as secretary when he was Programme Organiser
of the Burmese Service at External Services. I've got a photo of
myself, his wife and two children when we went to do an outside
broadcast at Leeds Castle. He was learning Thai at the time and went
on to open the Thai service of the BBC out there.
Nick Odell
2021-05-31 19:02:35 UTC
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On Mon, 31 May 2021 16:48:04 +0100, Vicky Ayech
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Mon, 31 May 2021 09:10:29 +0100, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
On Sun, 30 May 2021 16:35:28 -0700 (PDT), Min
<snip>
...a suicidal alcoholic sex-addicted PTSD-sufferer...
If that's not a line from Dylan, it must have come from AL Kennedy.
(Was the recent R4Extra repeat of Subterranean Homesick Blues part of
the BBC Dylan at 80 series or just random programming?)
Nick
I'm just watching Don't Look Back. Tiny kf.
About 12 minutes in the man from BBC African Service interviews him,
with less stupid questions than some previous ones they show. Then the
credits run for that and the producer was Colin Wild. I worked for
him about 5 years later as secretary when he was Programme Organiser
of the Burmese Service at External Services. I've got a photo of
myself, his wife and two children when we went to do an outside
broadcast at Leeds Castle. He was learning Thai at the time and went
on to open the Thai service of the BBC out there.
A very well deserved set of knickers if I might say so?

Nick
Peter
2021-05-31 14:11:44 UTC
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Post by Sid Nuncius
I saw a "virtual concert" during lockdown involving three current
singer-songwriters.  The great (and I do not use that word idly here)
Chris Smither played a cracking version of Visions Of Johanna and
afterward one of the others, obviously jokingly, said "I must look
into more of his work."  Smither acknowledged the joke, but added, "If
it weren't for him none of us would ever have written a song."
https://www.greennote.co.uk/production/chris-smither-peter-mulvey-the-suitcase-junket/
Visions Of Johanna (arranged in 3/4 time) is at around 1hr,10min and
worth a few minutes of anyone's time, IMO.
Dare I suggest that one good thing about it is that it's not sung by
Dylan? :-)
Post by Sid Nuncius
  I find I have paraphrased
the exchange afterward a little, but I've caught the the gist.
(It's free to watch.  I paid to watch the original live stream, and I'm
sure that will also include any umrats who want to hear that song.)
--
Just as 'beautiful' points the way for aesthetics and 'good' for ethics,
so do words like 'true' for logic. All sciences have truth as their
goal; but logic is also concerned with it in a quite different way:
logic has much the same relation to truth as physics has to weight or
heat. Frege in 'Thoughts' (Der Gedanke)
Sid Nuncius
2021-06-01 17:29:59 UTC
Reply
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Post by Peter
Post by Sid Nuncius
I saw a "virtual concert" during lockdown involving three current
singer-songwriters.  The great (and I do not use that word idly here)
Chris Smither played a cracking version of Visions Of Johanna and
afterward one of the others, obviously jokingly, said "I must look
into more of his work."  Smither acknowledged the joke, but added,
"If it weren't for him none of us would ever have written a song."
https://www.greennote.co.uk/production/chris-smither-peter-mulvey-the-suitcase-junket/
Visions Of Johanna (arranged in 3/4 time) is at around 1hr,10min and
worth a few minutes of anyone's time, IMO.
Dare I suggest that one good thing about it is that it's not sung by
Dylan? :-)
I think that's a defensible view, even though I don't agree with it in
this case. As I said, I find Dylan's, shall we say, distinctive voice
an integral part of what I love about many of his songs, especially the
earlier work. However, from an objectively musical viewpoint his voice
is pretty awful and I can see why people might prefer cover versions.
It may even be a contributing factor to the success of so many Dylan
covers, but I suspect that's very largely because of the quality of the
songs themselves.
--
Sid
(Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
BrritSki
2021-05-31 11:16:52 UTC
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On 30/05/2021 19:43, Sid Nuncius wrote:
<snip much good sense>
Post by Sid Nuncius
Just my two riders approaching worth.
On Loose Ends just now there was Chrissie Hinds singing a very good
cover of

0 - 0 ∫
-∞
BrritSki
2021-05-31 11:17:56 UTC
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Post by BrritSki
<snip much good sense>
Post by Sid Nuncius
Just my two riders approaching worth.
On Loose Ends just now there was Chrissie Hinds singing a very good
cover of
       ∞
0 - 0 ∫
      -∞
Apologies to tennis umpires and mathematicians.
Nick Odell
2021-06-01 18:42:27 UTC
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On Mon, 31 May 2021 12:16:52 +0100, BrritSki
Post by BrritSki
<snip much good sense>
Post by Sid Nuncius
Just my two riders approaching worth.
On Loose Ends just now there was Chrissie Hinds singing a very good
cover of
?
0 - 0 ?
-?
I have to take issue with you over the "very good" part of your
announcement. I thought I'd made a faulty download of her song because
there were strange glitches in the middle of her phrasing and I
thought they must have been drop-outs from the transfer or something.
But no, I listened on YouTube to some of the other tracks from that
album and they seemed to suffer from the same sort of thing. Nice
scenery though - any idea where it is?

It's a shame because I used like her work a lot. And I'm not saying
that because she was a customer of mine[1]

For the benefit of anyone who is interested, I've scoured the
schedules to find as many Bob Dylan at 80 related programmes so that
you don't have to. So far I've found five programmes on 6 Music under
the 6 Music Artist Collection at m000qp9l; m000qp9m; b011plnr;
m000w4rj; b00fnnwg and one under Shaun Keaveny, Episode 565 (m000wcjv)

Radio 2 had The Folk Show (m000wb5k) and The Blues Show (m000wcbq)

I didn't spot anything on Radio 3

Radio 4 had Archive on 4, Front Row on Friday May 21st[2], the
Mon-Friday 15-minute slot entitled "It Ain't Me You're Looking For Bob
Dylan at 80, The aforementioned tribute on Loose Ends and the Drama,
Dinner With Dylan m000qhgn.

Radio 4 Extra had the programme that started this thread, What's So
Great About Bob Dylan and finally, the BBC World Service had an
edition of Heart and Soul, Bob Dylan Born Again (w3ct2fzt)




Nick
[1]Because she wasn't a customer of mine but some people thought they
had seen her going into and out of my workshop. That woman was a
look-a-like who played in a Pretenders tribute band.
[2]Which was Martin Carthy's actual 80th birthday and all they asked
him about was Dylan
BrritSki
2021-06-02 09:53:40 UTC
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Post by Nick Odell
On Mon, 31 May 2021 12:16:52 +0100, BrritSki
Post by BrritSki
<snip much good sense>
Post by Sid Nuncius
Just my two riders approaching worth.
On Loose Ends just now there was Chrissie Hinds singing a very good
cover of
?
0 - 0 ?
-?
I have to take issue with you over the "very good" part of your
announcement. I thought I'd made a faulty download of her song because
there were strange glitches in the middle of her phrasing and I
thought they must have been drop-outs from the transfer or something.
But no, I listened on YouTube to some of the other tracks from that
album and they seemed to suffer from the same sort of thing. Nice
scenery though - any idea where it is?
No pictures on my DAB radio :)

Perhaps my assessment of VG was because I am not that keen on CH and
usually prefer originals to covers, so it was a relatively pleasant
surprise :/
Penny
2021-06-02 13:24:40 UTC
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On Wed, 2 Jun 2021 10:53:40 +0100, BrritSki <***@gmail.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by BrritSki
Post by Nick Odell
On Mon, 31 May 2021 12:16:52 +0100, BrritSki
Post by BrritSki
<snip much good sense>
Post by Sid Nuncius
Just my two riders approaching worth.
On Loose Ends just now there was Chrissie Hinds singing a very good
cover of
?
0 - 0 ?
-?
I have to take issue with you over the "very good" part of your
announcement. I thought I'd made a faulty download of her song because
there were strange glitches in the middle of her phrasing and I
thought they must have been drop-outs from the transfer or something.
But no, I listened on YouTube to some of the other tracks from that
album and they seemed to suffer from the same sort of thing. Nice
scenery though - any idea where it is?
No pictures on my DAB radio :)
Perhaps my assessment of VG was because I am not that keen on CH and
usually prefer originals to covers, so it was a relatively pleasant
surprise :/
FWIW, I found the glitchy delivery disturbing and when it started up on
Monday's repeat I turned it off.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Peter
2021-06-02 13:45:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
On Mon, 31 May 2021 12:16:52 +0100, BrritSki
Post by BrritSki
<snip much good sense>
Post by Sid Nuncius
Just my two riders approaching worth.
On Loose Ends just now there was Chrissie Hinds singing a very good
cover of
        ?
0 - 0 ?
       -?
I have to take issue with you over the "very good" part of your
announcement. I thought I'd made a faulty download of her song because
there were strange glitches in the middle of her phrasing and I
thought they must have been drop-outs from the transfer or something.
But no, I listened on YouTube to some of the other tracks from that
album and they seemed to suffer from the same sort of thing. Nice
scenery though - any idea where it is?
No pictures on my DAB radio  :)
Perhaps my assessment of VG was because I am not that keen on CH and
usually prefer originals to covers, so it was a relatively pleasant
surprise :/
I'd not even heard of Chrissie Hinds, which probably means I'm quite
unfit to comment on popular music. Will that stop me?
--
Just as 'beautiful' points the way for aesthetics and 'good' for ethics,
so do words like 'true' for logic. All sciences have truth as their
goal; but logic is also concerned with it in a quite different way:
logic has much the same relation to truth as physics has to weight or
heat. Frege in 'Thoughts' (Der Gedanke)
Penny
2021-05-31 12:31:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sun, 30 May 2021 19:43:07 +0100, Sid Nuncius <***@hotmail.co.uk>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Sid Nuncius
However, Dylan captured the mood and attitudes of a generation in the
60s in a way almost no-one else ever has, I would suggest, and that
whine and grating style was a part of its expression.
I listened to Dinner with Dylan https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m000qhgn
on Saturday. A dramatised meeting of the 'Bobclub' (Richard Curtis, Kerry
Shale, Lucas Hare) and, from a double booking error, Eileen Atkins, waiting
to be joined by Dylan and his manager in an Indian restaurant. They are
there for hours, waiting, drinking water and talking about what they would
not ask Bob when he showed up. He didn't show up.
Having been well served by the young waiter, who turned the Indian music
off for them, served them water and 2 popadoms, at the end of the evening,
when they gave up and went home, Richard Curtis tipped him well and gave
him a compilation of Dylan songs. The waiter had not heard of him but was
very polite.

Some time later Curtis called in to book the whole restaurant for a Dylan
karaoke night with other friends who were fans and asked the waiter what he
had thought of the music. He admitted to not listening to it yet but
promised he would. The waiter was the star of the karaoke and when asked
again if he liked the music said, "I liked his early stuff".

I find that's true of a lot of musicians (not all, by any means). In my own
case, I don't think I've heard any of Dylan's later stuff but loved what I
heard in the '60s and '70s.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Peter
2021-05-31 14:07:01 UTC
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Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Peter
I'm on Sir Lenworth's side.
https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00c7fbx
Yes.
Post by Sid Nuncius
I think Sir Len has a point about the whine and the grating music.
That's the bit I agree with. I think some of his lyrics are good
(especially so if you compare them with those of the "she loves you yeah
yeah yeah" kind).
Post by Sid Nuncius
I
also think that a significant proportion of Dylan's output is a long way
short of great.  (For example, those two albums of The Great American
Songbook are simply painful, IMO, and I've not found much of interest in
his work for about 40 years.)
However, Dylan captured the mood and attitudes of a generation in the
60s in a way almost no-one else ever has, I would suggest, and that
whine and grating style was a part of its expression.  He has also
written some simply magnificent songs, IMO.  He has (or, more
accurately, had) an ability to use language in obscure but
extraordinarily evocative ways which somehow often got to the heart of
things even though, in the cold light of day and subject to rational
analysis, meaning was elusive.  I would cite Ballad Of A Thin Man and
its attack on the press as just one example.
He was sometimes very direct, too - Like A Rolling Stone (also from
Highway 61 Revisited, possibly my favourite Dylan album) and Hurricane,
for example, pull no punches, and Sarah is simply a beautiful love song.
He has left an indelible mark in music, both directly and indirectly,
for decades.  I saw a "virtual concert" during lockdown involving three
current singer-songwriters.  The great (and I do not use that word idly
here) Chris Smither played a cracking version of Visions Of Johanna and
afterward one of the others, obviously jokingly, said "I must look into
more of his work."  Smither acknowledged the joke, but added, "If it
weren't for him none of us would ever have written a song."
I can understand why some people don't like his music, and I think the
hagiographical view some take of him is plain silly, but given his
colossal influence and the fact that his music is woven into the
metaphorical bones of a lot of people (including me) shurely make it
hard to argue against him being great, even if you don't like his music.
And personally I'd have awarded him the Nobel Prize just for the line
"The ghost of electricity howls in the bones of her face."  :o)
Just my two riders approaching worth.
--
Just as 'beautiful' points the way for aesthetics and 'good' for ethics,
so do words like 'true' for logic. All sciences have truth as their
goal; but logic is also concerned with it in a quite different way:
logic has much the same relation to truth as physics has to weight or
heat. Frege in 'Thoughts' (Der Gedanke)
Tony Smith
2021-05-31 16:08:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
<snipped>
Post by Sid Nuncius
However, Dylan captured the mood and attitudes of a generation in the
60s in a way almost no-one else ever has,
<snipped>

That is also true of the dippy rabbit in the Magic Roundabout.
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2021-05-31 16:34:51 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Tony Smith
<snipped>
Post by Sid Nuncius
However, Dylan captured the mood and attitudes of a generation in the
60s in a way almost no-one else ever has,
<snipped>
That is also true of the dippy rabbit in the Magic Roundabout.
My mother always admired the fact that the snail _wasn't_ called
something beginning with S, the rabbit R, and so on. (OK, I suppose
there's Dougal, but be was never suffixed "the dog".)

Probably Eric Thompson to thank. (I know he invented all the scripts.)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

But this can only happen if we replace the urge to blame with the urge to
learn so that it is safe for staff to admit errors and raise concerns without
the fear of being punished.
- Former MI5 boss Eliza Manningham-Buller, RT 2016/5/7-13
Peter
2021-05-31 16:42:25 UTC
Reply
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Post by Tony Smith
<snipped>
Post by Sid Nuncius
However, Dylan captured the mood and attitudes of a generation in the
60s in a way almost no-one else ever has,
<snipped>
That is also true of the dippy rabbit in the Magic Roundabout.
I once had a hand towel which, for reasons I can't remember, went very
pale in patches (did it somehow come into contact with bleach?). Dylon
turned it back into a beautiful blue.
--
Just as 'beautiful' points the way for aesthetics and 'good' for ethics,
so do words like 'true' for logic. All sciences have truth as their
goal; but logic is also concerned with it in a quite different way:
logic has much the same relation to truth as physics has to weight or
heat. Frege in 'Thoughts' (Der Gedanke)
Mike McMillan
2021-05-31 17:25:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter
Post by Tony Smith
<snipped>
Post by Sid Nuncius
However, Dylan captured the mood and attitudes of a generation in the
60s in a way almost no-one else ever has,
<snipped>
That is also true of the dippy rabbit in the Magic Roundabout.
I once had a hand towel which, for reasons I can't remember, went very
pale in patches (did it somehow come into contact with bleach?). Dylon
turned it back into a beautiful blue.
Some people have been known to dye for less…
--
Toddle Pip, Mike McMillan
Sid Nuncius
2021-06-01 06:59:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Tony Smith
<snipped>
Post by Sid Nuncius
However, Dylan captured the mood and attitudes of a generation in the
60s in a way almost no-one else ever has,
<snipped>
That is also true of the dippy rabbit in the Magic Roundabout.
True. And he opened the batting for my side when Nuncius2 and I played
cricket in the garden.

(ISTR that Benny The Ball was my wily spinner and Serf Harold a hostile
opening bowler. My word, that was a long time ago...)
--
Sid
(Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Joe Kerr
2021-06-03 21:27:05 UTC
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Post by Tony Smith
<snipped>
Post by Sid Nuncius
However, Dylan captured the mood and attitudes of a generation in the
60s in a way almost no-one else ever has,
<snipped>
That is also true of the dippy rabbit in the Magic Roundabout.
True.  And he opened the batting for my side when Nuncius2 and I played
cricket in the garden.
(ISTR that Benny The Ball was my wily spinner
You don't want to know what I read that as. It'll take me a while to get
over that boggle.

and Serf Harold a hostile
opening bowler.  My word, that was a long time ago...)
--
Ric
Nick Odell
2021-06-03 22:04:06 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Joe Kerr
Post by Tony Smith
<snipped>
Post by Sid Nuncius
However, Dylan captured the mood and attitudes of a generation in the
60s in a way almost no-one else ever has,
<snipped>
That is also true of the dippy rabbit in the Magic Roundabout.
True.  And he opened the batting for my side when Nuncius2 and I played
cricket in the garden.
(ISTR that Benny The Ball was my wily spinner
You don't want to know what I read that as. It'll take me a while to get
over that boggle.
Was that a Batsman's Holding moment for you?


Nick
Mike McMillan
2021-06-04 07:48:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Joe Kerr
Post by Tony Smith
<snipped>
Post by Sid Nuncius
However, Dylan captured the mood and attitudes of a generation in the
60s in a way almost no-one else ever has,
<snipped>
That is also true of the dippy rabbit in the Magic Roundabout.
True.  And he opened the batting for my side when Nuncius2 and I played
cricket in the garden.
(ISTR that Benny The Ball was my wily spinner
You don't want to know what I read that as. It'll take me a while to get
over that boggle.
Was that a Batsman's Holding moment for you?
Nick
He’ll legover it in time…
--
Toddle Pip, Mike McMillan
steve hague
2021-06-04 08:14:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Joe Kerr
Post by Tony Smith
<snipped>
Post by Sid Nuncius
However, Dylan captured the mood and attitudes of a generation in the
60s in a way almost no-one else ever has,
<snipped>
That is also true of the dippy rabbit in the Magic Roundabout.
True.  And he opened the batting for my side when Nuncius2 and I played
cricket in the garden.
(ISTR that Benny The Ball was my wily spinner
You don't want to know what I read that as. It'll take me a while to get
over that boggle.
Was that a Batsman's Holding moment for you?
Nick
The bowler's Holding, the batsman's... Shirley?
Mike McMillan
2021-06-04 08:48:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by steve hague
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Joe Kerr
Post by Tony Smith
<snipped>
Post by Sid Nuncius
However, Dylan captured the mood and attitudes of a generation in the
60s in a way almost no-one else ever has,
<snipped>
That is also true of the dippy rabbit in the Magic Roundabout.
True.  And he opened the batting for my side when Nuncius2 and I played
cricket in the garden.
(ISTR that Benny The Ball was my wily spinner
You don't want to know what I read that as. It'll take me a while to get
over that boggle.
Was that a Batsman's Holding moment for you?
Nick
The bowler's Holding, the batsman's... Shirley?
And didn’t Thaggie Matcher have something to say about everyone needing a
‘batsman’?
--
Toddle Pip, Mike McMillan
Nick Odell
2021-06-04 09:02:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Fri, 4 Jun 2021 09:14:37 +0100, steve hague
Post by steve hague
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Joe Kerr
Post by Tony Smith
<snipped>
Post by Sid Nuncius
However, Dylan captured the mood and attitudes of a generation in the
60s in a way almost no-one else ever has,
<snipped>
That is also true of the dippy rabbit in the Magic Roundabout.
True.  And he opened the batting for my side when Nuncius2 and I played
cricket in the garden.
(ISTR that Benny The Ball was my wily spinner
You don't want to know what I read that as. It'll take me a while to get
over that boggle.
Was that a Batsman's Holding moment for you?
Nick
The bowler's Holding, the batsman's... Shirley?
"Ah, just waiting to see who'd be the first one to spot that"

"Well done, Pike."


Nick
Mike McMillan
2021-06-04 09:28:50 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
On Fri, 4 Jun 2021 09:14:37 +0100, steve hague
Post by steve hague
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Joe Kerr
Post by Tony Smith
<snipped>
Post by Sid Nuncius
However, Dylan captured the mood and attitudes of a generation in the
60s in a way almost no-one else ever has,
<snipped>
That is also true of the dippy rabbit in the Magic Roundabout.
True.  And he opened the batting for my side when Nuncius2 and I played
cricket in the garden.
(ISTR that Benny The Ball was my wily spinner
You don't want to know what I read that as. It'll take me a while to get
over that boggle.
Was that a Batsman's Holding moment for you?
Nick
The bowler's Holding, the batsman's... Shirley?
"Ah, just waiting to see who'd be the first one to spot that"
"Well done, Pike."
Nick
‘Don’t tell him your name Willy!
--
Toddle Pip, Mike McMillan
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