Discussion:
OT ‘wych’ revisited
(too old to reply)
Chris McMillan
2019-06-11 08:18:52 UTC
Permalink
1796

Well, someone asked!

As an Odd Fellow (the society was named being formed by craftsmen from a
number of unrelated traces) from birth, I was browsing a link I was sent.

”Following persecution in the UK’s capital, The Grand United Order of Odd
Fellows relocated its Grand Lodge (HQ) from its Old Wych St (Aldwych)
location to Sheffield”.

Sincerely Chris
BrritSki
2019-06-11 09:19:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chris McMillan
1796
Well, someone asked!
As an Odd Fellow (the society was named being formed by craftsmen from a
number of unrelated traces) from birth, I was browsing a link I was sent.
”Following persecution in the UK’s capital, The Grand United Order of Odd
Fellows relocated its Grand Lodge (HQ) from its Old Wych St (Aldwych)
location to Sheffield”.
On a related subject, the somewhat pretentious Masters of Photography on
Sky Arts had a task which involved the contestants producing a diptych
of look-alikes both as themselves and as who they (allegedly) looked alike.

How would the worshipful company of umrats pronounce diptych:
dip-titch or
dip-tick ?

EMNTK
John Ashby
2019-06-11 11:29:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by BrritSki
Post by Chris McMillan
1796
Well, someone asked!
As an Odd Fellow (the society was named being formed by craftsmen from a
number of unrelated traces) from birth,  I was browsing a link I was
sent.
”Following persecution in the UK’s capital, The Grand United Order of Odd
Fellows relocated its Grand Lodge (HQ) from its Old Wych St (Aldwych)
location to Sheffield”.
On a related subject, the somewhat pretentious Masters of Photography on
Sky Arts had a task which involved the contestants producing a diptych
of look-alikes both as themselves and as who they (allegedly) looked alike.
dip-titch or
dip-tick ?
EMNTK
I would, probably incorrectly, pronounce the ch as in loch

john
Jim Easterbrook
2019-06-11 11:55:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by John Ashby
dip-titch or dip-tick ?
EMNTK
I would, probably incorrectly, pronounce the ch as in loch
MTAAW.
--
Jim <http://www.jim-easterbrook.me.uk/>
1959/1985? M B+ G+ A L- I- S- P-- CH0(p) Ar++ T+ H0 Q--- Sh0
Tony Smith Gloucestershire
2019-06-11 12:39:24 UTC
Permalink
+1
Tony Smith Gloucestershire
2019-06-11 15:37:58 UTC
Permalink
John, +1
LFS
2019-06-11 16:04:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by John Ashby
Post by BrritSki
Post by Chris McMillan
1796
Well, someone asked!
As an Odd Fellow (the society was named being formed by craftsmen from a
number of unrelated traces) from birth,  I was browsing a link I was
sent.
”Following persecution in the UK’s capital, The Grand United Order of Odd
Fellows relocated its Grand Lodge (HQ) from its Old Wych St (Aldwych)
location to Sheffield”.
On a related subject, the somewhat pretentious Masters of Photography
on Sky Arts had a task which involved the contestants producing a
diptych of look-alikes both as themselves and as who they (allegedly)
looked alike.
dip-titch or
dip-tick ?
EMNTK
I would, probably incorrectly, pronounce the ch as in loch
On a tour of the National Gallery, I remember the guide saying dip-tick
and trip-tick, but I think I've also heard dip-titch.
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
Sid Nuncius
2019-06-11 16:53:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by LFS
Post by John Ashby
Post by BrritSki
Post by Chris McMillan
1796
Well, someone asked!
As an Odd Fellow (the society was named being formed by craftsmen from a
number of unrelated traces) from birth,  I was browsing a link I was
sent.
”Following persecution in the UK’s capital, The Grand United Order of Odd
Fellows relocated its Grand Lodge (HQ) from its Old Wych St (Aldwych)
location to Sheffield”.
On a related subject, the somewhat pretentious Masters of Photography
on Sky Arts had a task which involved the contestants producing a
diptych of look-alikes both as themselves and as who they (allegedly)
looked alike.
dip-titch or
dip-tick ?
EMNTK
I would, probably incorrectly, pronounce the ch as in loch
On a tour of the National Gallery, I remember the guide saying dip-tick
and trip-tick, but I think I've also heard dip-titch.
I've always said dip-tick and the on-line sources I've looked at suggest
this is how they pronounce it. (e.g.
https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/diptych )

My guess is that alternative pronunciations are quite common and not
"incorrect".

JPG - what say you?
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Jenny M Benson
2019-06-11 23:04:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
My guess is that alternative pronunciations are quite common and not
"incorrect".
I heard a new-to-me pronunciation this evening. I was watching a
recording of a tv from, I think, PBS America and during an ad-break they
were touting some prog about the Nazis and mentioned sufficient evidence
or lack of it "to in-dict them" for their crimes. I re-wound to be sure
I really had heard what I thought I'd heard.
--
Jenny M Benson
http://jennygenes.blogspot.co.uk/
Chris J Dixon
2019-06-12 07:41:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jenny M Benson
I heard a new-to-me pronunciation this evening. I was watching a
recording of a tv from, I think, PBS America and during an ad-break they
were touting some prog about the Nazis and mentioned sufficient evidence
or lack of it "to in-dict them" for their crimes. I re-wound to be sure
I really had heard what I thought I'd heard.
Watching a Quest programme about fishing in Alaska, they showed
vast quantities of pollock being processed, and turned into
fillets. Not only was "fillet" pronounced as a fillay, but the
clever mechanisms were correspondingly fillaying machines.

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk @ChrisJDixon1
Plant amazing Acers.
BrritSki
2019-06-12 07:58:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by Jenny M Benson
I heard a new-to-me pronunciation this evening. I was watching a
recording of a tv from, I think, PBS America and during an ad-break they
were touting some prog about the Nazis and mentioned sufficient evidence
or lack of it "to in-dict them" for their crimes. I re-wound to be sure
I really had heard what I thought I'd heard.
Watching a Quest programme about fishing in Alaska, they showed
vast quantities of pollock being processed, and turned into
fillets. Not only was "fillet" pronounced as a fillay, but the
clever mechanisms were correspondingly fillaying machines.
Yes, I am familiar with both those pronunciations from my time in Texas.
Mike
2019-06-12 08:24:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by Jenny M Benson
I heard a new-to-me pronunciation this evening. I was watching a
recording of a tv from, I think, PBS America and during an ad-break they
were touting some prog about the Nazis and mentioned sufficient evidence
or lack of it "to in-dict them" for their crimes. I re-wound to be sure
I really had heard what I thought I'd heard.
Watching a Quest programme about fishing in Alaska, they showed
vast quantities of pollock being processed, and turned into
fillets. Not only was "fillet" pronounced as a fillay, but the
clever mechanisms were correspondingly fillaying machines.
Chris
Sounds like a load of pollock to me (or should that be polleaux?).
--
Toodle Pip
Paul Herber
2019-06-12 13:33:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by Jenny M Benson
I heard a new-to-me pronunciation this evening. I was watching a
recording of a tv from, I think, PBS America and during an ad-break they
were touting some prog about the Nazis and mentioned sufficient evidence
or lack of it "to in-dict them" for their crimes. I re-wound to be sure
I really had heard what I thought I'd heard.
Watching a Quest programme about fishing in Alaska, they showed
vast quantities of pollock being processed, and turned into
fillets. Not only was "fillet" pronounced as a fillay, but the
clever mechanisms were correspondingly fillaying machines.
Chris
Sounds like a load of pollock to me (or should that be polleaux?).
I used to work just off Bollo Lane.
--
Regards, Paul Herber
http://www.paulherber.co.uk/
Penny
2019-06-12 15:30:24 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 12 Jun 2019 08:41:52 +0100, Chris J Dixon <***@cdixon.me.uk>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by Jenny M Benson
I heard a new-to-me pronunciation this evening. I was watching a
recording of a tv from, I think, PBS America and during an ad-break they
were touting some prog about the Nazis and mentioned sufficient evidence
or lack of it "to in-dict them" for their crimes. I re-wound to be sure
I really had heard what I thought I'd heard.
Watching a Quest programme about fishing in Alaska, they showed
vast quantities of pollock being processed, and turned into
fillets. Not only was "fillet" pronounced as a fillay, but the
clever mechanisms were correspondingly fillaying machines.
American pronunciation of 'foreign' words tends to be very different from
ours, even when the sounds are the same the emphasis tends to be different
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Jenny M Benson
2019-06-13 10:15:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
American pronunciation of 'foreign' words tends to be very different from
ours, even when the sounds are the same the emphasis tends to be different
There are certainly a few words, "fillet" being one of them, where the
American pronunciation is closer to the original French.
--
Jenny M Benson
http://jennygenes.blogspot.co.uk/
Kate B
2019-06-13 21:55:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Penny
American pronunciation of 'foreign' words tends to be very different from
ours, even when the sounds are the same the emphasis tends to be different
There are certainly a few words, "fillet" being one of them, where the
American pronunciation is closer to the original French.
Not with that stressed dipthong on the second syllable, it's not. It
took me an unconscionable amount of time to clock Chick-fil-A.
--
Kate B
London
Sid Nuncius
2019-06-14 06:59:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kate B
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Penny
American pronunciation of 'foreign' words tends to be very different from
ours, even when the sounds are the same the emphasis tends to be different
There are certainly a few words, "fillet" being one of them, where the
American pronunciation is closer to the original French.
Not with that stressed dipthong on the second syllable, it's not. It
took me an unconscionable amount of time to clock Chick-fil-A.
Chick-fil-A! No! We will not let him go!
Oh mama mia, mama mia, mama mia let me go
Beelzebub has a devil put aside for me for me...


I'll get me coat.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
BrritSki
2019-06-14 07:46:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kate B
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Penny
American pronunciation of 'foreign' words tends to be very different from
ours, even when the sounds are the same the emphasis tends to be different
There are certainly a few words, "fillet" being one of them, where the
American pronunciation is closer to the original French.
Not with that stressed dipthong on the second syllable, it's not. It
took me an unconscionable amount of time to clock Chick-fil-A.
Lever is another one as in "levers of power".

Not said as leaver, but more like levver.
Jim Easterbrook
2019-06-14 09:13:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by BrritSki
Post by Kate B
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Penny
American pronunciation of 'foreign' words tends to be very different
from ours, even when the sounds are the same the emphasis tends to be
different
There are certainly a few words, "fillet" being one of them, where the
American pronunciation is closer to the original French.
Not with that stressed dipthong on the second syllable, it's not. It
took me an unconscionable amount of time to clock Chick-fil-A.
Lever is another one as in "levers of power".
Not said as leaver, but more like levver.
I was confused the first time I heard someone was "N rowt" to somewhere.
--
Jim <http://www.jim-easterbrook.me.uk/>
1959/1985? M B+ G+ A L- I- S- P-- CH0(p) Ar++ T+ H0 Q--- Sh0
Mike
2019-06-14 09:33:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by BrritSki
Post by Kate B
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Penny
American pronunciation of 'foreign' words tends to be very different
from ours, even when the sounds are the same the emphasis tends to be
different
There are certainly a few words, "fillet" being one of them, where the
American pronunciation is closer to the original French.
Not with that stressed dipthong on the second syllable, it's not. It
took me an unconscionable amount of time to clock Chick-fil-A.
Lever is another one as in "levers of power".
Not said as leaver, but more like levver.
I was confused the first time I heard someone was "N rowt" to somewhere.
Americans use rowters where British use routers... (‘rooters’), The
Canadians seem to use rowter to.
--
Toodle Pip
Mike
2019-06-14 09:34:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by BrritSki
Post by Kate B
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Penny
American pronunciation of 'foreign' words tends to be very different
from ours, even when the sounds are the same the emphasis tends to be
different
There are certainly a few words, "fillet" being one of them, where the
American pronunciation is closer to the original French.
Not with that stressed dipthong on the second syllable, it's not. It
took me an unconscionable amount of time to clock Chick-fil-A.
Lever is another one as in "levers of power".
Not said as leaver, but more like levver.
I was confused the first time I heard someone was "N rowt" to somewhere.
Americans use rowters where British use routers... (‘rooters’), The
Canadians seem to use rowter to.
Sorry, ... too.
--
Toodle Pip
Nick Odell
2019-06-14 11:24:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by BrritSki
Post by Kate B
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Penny
American pronunciation of 'foreign' words tends to be very different
from ours, even when the sounds are the same the emphasis tends to be
different
There are certainly a few words, "fillet" being one of them, where the
American pronunciation is closer to the original French.
Not with that stressed dipthong on the second syllable, it's not. It
took me an unconscionable amount of time to clock Chick-fil-A.
Lever is another one as in "levers of power".
Not said as leaver, but more like levver.
I was confused the first time I heard someone was "N rowt" to somewhere.
Americans use rowters where British use routers... (‘rooters’), The
Canadians seem to use rowter to.
I use a rowter to cut wood and a rooter for my broadband. HTH

Nick
Jim Easterbrook
2019-06-14 11:32:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
I use a rowter to cut wood and a rooter for my broadband. HTH
MTAAW
--
Jim <http://www.jim-easterbrook.me.uk/>
1959/1985? M B+ G+ A L- I- S- P-- CH0(p) Ar++ T+ H0 Q--- Sh0
Mike
2019-06-14 13:28:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Mike
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by BrritSki
Post by Kate B
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Penny
American pronunciation of 'foreign' words tends to be very different
from ours, even when the sounds are the same the emphasis tends to be
different
There are certainly a few words, "fillet" being one of them, where the
American pronunciation is closer to the original French.
Not with that stressed dipthong on the second syllable, it's not. It
took me an unconscionable amount of time to clock Chick-fil-A.
Lever is another one as in "levers of power".
Not said as leaver, but more like levver.
I was confused the first time I heard someone was "N rowt" to somewhere.
Americans use rowters where British use routers... (‘rooters’), The
Canadians seem to use rowter to.
I use a rowter to cut wood and a rooter for my broadband. HTH
Nick
Meat oo
--
Toodle Pip
Penny
2019-06-14 11:36:49 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 14 Jun 2019 09:33:04 GMT, Mike <***@ntlworld.com> scrawled
in the dust...
Post by Mike
Post by Jim Easterbrook
I was confused the first time I heard someone was "N rowt" to somewhere.
Americans use rowters where British use routers... (‘rooters’), The
Canadians seem to use rowter to.
Also Australians, I had this conversation with bro#2 recently, I think he's
been living in Oz for too long. Although I think he still plans a 'root'
for his bicycle trips.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Jenny M Benson
2019-06-14 11:50:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
Post by Mike
Americans use rowters where British use routers... (‘rooters’), The
Canadians seem to use rowter to.
Also Australians, I had this conversation with bro#2 recently, I think he's
been living in Oz for too long. Although I think he still plans a 'root'
for his bicycle trips.
-- Penny
Don't the Australians have a completely different meaning for "root"?
Family newsgroup and all, but you'll know what I mean!
--
Jenny M Benson
http://jennygenes.blogspot.co.uk/
Sid Nuncius
2019-06-14 13:11:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Penny
Post by Mike
Americans use rowters where British use routers... (‘rooters’), The
Canadians seem to use rowter to.
Also Australians, I had this conversation with bro#2 recently, I think he's
been living in Oz for too long. Although I think he still plans a 'root'
for his bicycle trips.
Don't the Australians have a completely different meaning for "root"?
Family newsgroup and all, but you'll know what I mean!
They do. They used to refer to the three England batsmen Cook, Trott
and Root as "The Verbs".
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
BrritSki
2019-06-14 13:21:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Penny
Post by Mike
Americans use rowters where British use routers... (‘rooters’), The
Canadians seem to use rowter to.
Also Australians, I had this conversation with bro#2 recently, I think he's
been living in Oz for too long. Although I think he still plans a 'root'
for his bicycle trips.
Don't the Australians have a completely different meaning for "root"?
Family newsgroup and all, but you'll know what I mean!
They do.  They used to refer to the three England batsmen Cook, Trott
and Root as "The Verbs".
:)

Today's game looking good so far...
Penny
2019-06-14 17:40:06 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 14 Jun 2019 12:50:07 +0100, Jenny M Benson <***@hotmail.co.uk>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Penny
Post by Mike
Americans use rowters where British use routers... (‘rooters’), The
Canadians seem to use rowter to.
Also Australians, I had this conversation with bro#2 recently, I think he's
been living in Oz for too long. Although I think he still plans a 'root'
for his bicycle trips.
-- Penny
Don't the Australians have a completely different meaning for "root"?
Family newsgroup and all, but you'll know what I mean!
Indeed but I don't believe his route includes rooting.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Joe Kerr
2019-06-17 20:15:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by BrritSki
Post by Kate B
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Penny
American pronunciation of 'foreign' words tends to be very different
from ours, even when the sounds are the same the emphasis tends to be
different
There are certainly a few words, "fillet" being one of them, where the
American pronunciation is closer to the original French.
Not with that stressed dipthong on the second syllable, it's not. It
took me an unconscionable amount of time to clock Chick-fil-A.
Lever is another one as in "levers of power".
Not said as leaver, but more like levver.
I was confused the first time I heard someone was "N rowt" to somewhere.
Americans use rowters where British use routers... (‘rooters’), The
Canadians seem to use rowter to.
They shouldn't. They speak English in Canada. I've had to act as
interpreter between Canadians and Americans in the past.
--
Ric
steveski
2019-06-18 00:53:12 UTC
Permalink
[]
Post by Joe Kerr
Post by Mike
Americans use rowters where British use routers... (‘rooters’), The
Canadians seem to use rowter to.
They shouldn't. They speak English in Canada. I've had to act as
interpreter between Canadians and Americans in the past.
Some years ago I realised that Americans speak American with a North
American accent, whereas Canadians speak English with a North American
accent. [1]
--
Steveski

[1] Mostly . . .
Rosemary Miskin
2019-06-18 09:59:39 UTC
Permalink
whereas Canadians speak English with a North American accent.
Except in Newfoundland, where the Devon accent is very
apparent among the locals - or was when I was there, 40+
years ago!

Rosemary
Tony Smith Gloucestershire
2019-06-20 13:29:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Rosemary Miskin
Except in Newfoundland, where the Devon accent is very
apparent among the locals - or was when I was there, 40+
years ago!
I remember hearing that you and your father had seen the Norse archaeological site on Newfoundland. I have never been there, though I once tried to get to the Norse site at Gardar in Greenland, but the ship could not get into the fjord for the drfit-ice.
BrritSki
2019-06-12 07:56:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by LFS
Post by John Ashby
Post by BrritSki
Post by Chris McMillan
1796
Well, someone asked!
As an Odd Fellow (the society was named being formed by craftsmen from a
number of unrelated traces) from birth,  I was browsing a link I
was sent.
”Following persecution in the UK’s capital, The Grand United Order of Odd
Fellows relocated its Grand Lodge (HQ) from its Old Wych St (Aldwych)
location to Sheffield”.
On a related subject, the somewhat pretentious Masters of
Photography on Sky Arts had a task which involved the contestants
producing a diptych of look-alikes both as themselves and as who
they (allegedly) looked alike.
dip-titch or
dip-tick ?
EMNTK
I would, probably incorrectly, pronounce the ch as in loch
On a tour of the National Gallery, I remember the guide saying
dip-tick and trip-tick, but I think I've also heard dip-titch.
I've always said dip-tick and the on-line sources I've looked at suggest
this is how they pronounce it.  (e.g.
https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/diptych )
My guess is that alternative pronunciations are quite common and not
"incorrect".
Thanks everyone. I would agree on the dip-tick version, but the judges
all said dip-titch. However only 1 of them was English, but I'm
surprised the Italian didn't use the hard ch sound as they do in chiesa etc.
Tony Smith Gloucestershire
2019-06-13 09:28:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by LFS
Post by John Ashby
Post by BrritSki
Post by Chris McMillan
1796
Well, someone asked!
As an Odd Fellow (the society was named being formed by craftsmen from a
number of unrelated traces) from birth,  I was browsing a link I was
sent.
”Following persecution in the UK’s capital, The Grand United Order of Odd
Fellows relocated its Grand Lodge (HQ) from its Old Wych St (Aldwych)
location to Sheffield”.
On a related subject, the somewhat pretentious Masters of Photography
on Sky Arts had a task which involved the contestants producing a
diptych of look-alikes both as themselves and as who they (allegedly)
looked alike.
dip-titch or
dip-tick ?
EMNTK
I would, probably incorrectly, pronounce the ch as in loch
On a tour of the National Gallery, I remember the guide saying dip-tick
and trip-tick, but I think I've also heard dip-titch.
I've always said dip-tick and the on-line sources I've looked at suggest
this is how they pronounce it. (e.g.
https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/diptych )
The word "diptych" is of Greek origin and has there a "chi".

Do people put a hard or soft "ch" in "cherubim"?
Mike
2019-06-13 10:44:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony Smith Gloucestershire
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by LFS
Post by John Ashby
Post by BrritSki
Post by Chris McMillan
1796
Well, someone asked!
As an Odd Fellow (the society was named being formed by craftsmen from a
number of unrelated traces) from birth,  I was browsing a link I was
sent.
”Following persecution in the UK’s capital, The Grand United Order of Odd
Fellows relocated its Grand Lodge (HQ) from its Old Wych St (Aldwych)
location to Sheffield”.
On a related subject, the somewhat pretentious Masters of Photography
on Sky Arts had a task which involved the contestants producing a
diptych of look-alikes both as themselves and as who they (allegedly)
looked alike.
dip-titch or
dip-tick ?
EMNTK
I would, probably incorrectly, pronounce the ch as in loch
On a tour of the National Gallery, I remember the guide saying dip-tick
and trip-tick, but I think I've also heard dip-titch.
I've always said dip-tick and the on-line sources I've looked at suggest
this is how they pronounce it. (e.g.
https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/diptych )
The word "diptych" is of Greek origin and has there a "chi".
Do people put a hard or soft "ch" in "cherubim"?
Most definitely!
--
Toodle Pip
BrritSki
2019-06-13 10:50:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony Smith Gloucestershire
Post by Sid Nuncius
I've always said dip-tick and the on-line sources I've looked at suggest
this is how they pronounce it. (e.g.
https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/diptych )
The word "diptych" is of Greek origin and has there a "chi".
Do people put a hard or soft "ch" in "cherubim"?
Soft. But that's not nesser celery how the Ancients pronounced it.
BrritSki
2019-06-13 11:03:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by BrritSki
Post by Tony Smith Gloucestershire
Post by Sid Nuncius
I've always said dip-tick and the on-line sources I've looked at suggest
this is how they pronounce it.  (e.g.
https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/diptych )
The word "diptych" is of Greek origin and has there a "chi".
Do people put a hard or soft "ch" in "cherubim"?
Soft. But that's not nesser celery how the Ancients pronounced it.
PS In Italian it's cherubini wih a hard k sound at start. I'm guessing
that is closer to the original BIMBAM

We should ask Professor Jim !
Nick Odell
2019-06-13 11:11:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by BrritSki
Post by Tony Smith Gloucestershire
Post by Sid Nuncius
I've always said dip-tick and the on-line sources I've looked at suggest
this is how they pronounce it.  (e.g.
https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/diptych )
The word "diptych" is of Greek origin and has there a "chi".
Do people put a hard or soft "ch" in "cherubim"?
Soft. But that's not nesser celery how the Ancients pronounced it.
PS  In Italian it's cherubini wih a hard k sound at start. I'm guessing
that is closer to the original BIMBAM
We should ask Professor Jim !
Wacko!

Nick
Mike
2019-06-13 11:15:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
Post by BrritSki
Post by Tony Smith Gloucestershire
Post by Sid Nuncius
I've always said dip-tick and the on-line sources I've looked at suggest
this is how they pronounce it.  (e.g.
https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/diptych )
The word "diptych" is of Greek origin and has there a "chi".
Do people put a hard or soft "ch" in "cherubim"?
Soft. But that's not nesser celery how the Ancients pronounced it.
PS  In Italian it's cherubini wih a hard k sound at start. I'm guessing
that is closer to the original BIMBAM
We should ask Professor Jim !
Wacko!
Nick
That pocket watch swing into the waistcoat pocket may have taken a little
practice!
--
Toodle Pip
Sid Nuncius
2019-06-13 15:57:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony Smith Gloucestershire
Do people put a hard or soft "ch" in "cherubim"?
Either way, they'll be banged up for it if they're found out.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Nick Odell
2019-06-13 16:18:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Tony Smith Gloucestershire
Do people put a hard or soft "ch" in "cherubim"?
Either way, they'll be banged up for it if they're found out.
PUHRLEEZE Not with my afternoon cuppa, if you don't mind.

(Another tablecloth for the wash...)

Oh and, if the original PUHRLEEZE lady is listening, this is a BUMRA if
ever there was one.

Nick
Mike
2019-06-13 17:43:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Tony Smith Gloucestershire
Do people put a hard or soft "ch" in "cherubim"?
Either way, they'll be banged up for it if they're found out.
Viagra was not intended for that Sid!
--
Toodle Pip
Jenny M Benson
2019-06-11 12:17:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by BrritSki
On a related subject, the somewhat pretentious Masters of Photography on
Sky Arts had a task which involved the contestants producing a diptych
of look-alikes both as themselves and as who they (allegedly) looked alike.
dip-titch or
dip-tick ?
I don't think I've ever read the word, but I may have heard it
pronounced dip-titch or else read it and pronounced it that way in my head.
--
Jenny M Benson
http://jennygenes.blogspot.co.uk/
Penny
2019-06-11 14:51:11 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 11 Jun 2019 10:19:26 +0100, BrritSki <***@gmail.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by BrritSki
dip-titch or
dip-tick ?
Yes
HTH
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
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