Discussion:
OT: dates (the fruit)
(too old to reply)
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2021-06-22 16:19:07 UTC
Permalink
Does anyone actually use - or even remember anyone else using! - the
weedy plastic thing (I think it's supposed to resemble a twig) that
comes in a box/tray of dates, I think supposed to be used to pick them
up by piercing?

(Why do dates traditionally come in boxes/trays that shape - is it to
hold the plastic twig?)

Currently enjoying a couple of boxes that were 50p a box in Sainbugs.
(_Including_ the useless plastic twig.)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

After all is said and done, usually more is said.
Mike McMillan
2021-06-22 17:58:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Does anyone actually use - or even remember anyone else using! - the
weedy plastic thing (I think it's supposed to resemble a twig) that
comes in a box/tray of dates, I think supposed to be used to pick them
up by piercing?
(Why do dates traditionally come in boxes/trays that shape - is it to
hold the plastic twig?)
Currently enjoying a couple of boxes that were 50p a box in Sainbugs.
(_Including_ the useless plastic twig.)
Yup, I use the white plastic twig shaped ‘fork’ to impale dates before
scoffing them. (Not that I have had any such fruit for some time now).
--
Toddle Pip, Mike McMillan
Sam Plusnet
2021-06-22 20:37:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Does anyone actually use - or even remember anyone else using! - the
weedy plastic thing (I think it's supposed to resemble a twig) that
comes in a box/tray of dates, I think supposed to be used to pick them
up by piercing?
(Why do dates traditionally come in boxes/trays that shape - is it to
hold the plastic twig?)
Currently enjoying a couple of boxes that were 50p a box in Sainbugs.
(_Including_ the useless plastic twig.)
Yup, I use the white plastic twig shaped ‘fork’ to impale dates before
scoffing them. (Not that I have had any such fruit for some time now).
I can attest that date packaging in that format came into being long
before the advent of those weedy plastic stabby things.

However, I cannot for the life of me recall what predated (not predated
obv.) the plastic stabby twig - maybe a real twig?
--
Sam Plusnet
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2021-06-22 20:37:17 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 22 Jun 2021 at 17:58:02, Mike McMillan
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Does anyone actually use - or even remember anyone else using! - the
weedy plastic thing (I think it's supposed to resemble a twig) that
comes in a box/tray of dates, I think supposed to be used to pick them
up by piercing?
(Why do dates traditionally come in boxes/trays that shape - is it to
hold the plastic twig?)
Currently enjoying a couple of boxes that were 50p a box in Sainbugs.
(_Including_ the useless plastic twig.)
Yup, I use the white plastic twig shaped ‘fork’ to impale dates before
scoffing them. (Not that I have had any such fruit for some time now).
Interesting. I didn't think it was strong enough.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

if you're paying for something, you're the customer; if you're getting it
free, you're the product.
Mike McMillan
2021-06-23 07:30:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
On Tue, 22 Jun 2021 at 17:58:02, Mike McMillan
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Does anyone actually use - or even remember anyone else using! - the
weedy plastic thing (I think it's supposed to resemble a twig) that
comes in a box/tray of dates, I think supposed to be used to pick them
up by piercing?
(Why do dates traditionally come in boxes/trays that shape - is it to
hold the plastic twig?)
Currently enjoying a couple of boxes that were 50p a box in Sainbugs.
(_Including_ the useless plastic twig.)
Yup, I use the white plastic twig shaped ‘fork’ to impale dates before
scoffing them. (Not that I have had any such fruit for some time now).
Interesting. I didn't think it was strong enough.
Needs to be held well down the twig to prevent undue flexing.
--
Toddle Pip, Mike McMillan
Penny
2021-06-22 22:24:58 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 22 Jun 2021 17:19:07 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
(Why do dates traditionally come in boxes/trays that shape - is it to
hold the plastic twig?)
I think it is the general shape of a bunch of dates on the palm - if my
grandfather's sketches are anything to go by.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2021-06-23 00:58:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
On Tue, 22 Jun 2021 17:19:07 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
(Why do dates traditionally come in boxes/trays that shape - is it to
hold the plastic twig?)
I think it is the general shape of a bunch of dates on the palm - if my
grandfather's sketches are anything to go by.
Interesting! Thanks.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

The best things in life aren't things. - Bear Grylls (RT 2015/2/14-20)
Penny
2021-06-23 09:23:27 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 23 Jun 2021 01:58:28 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Penny
On Tue, 22 Jun 2021 17:19:07 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
(Why do dates traditionally come in boxes/trays that shape - is it to
hold the plastic twig?)
I think it is the general shape of a bunch of dates on the palm - if my
grandfather's sketches are anything to go by.
Interesting! Thanks.
Having found the drawing I was thinking of, it doesn't really show what I
thought it did but a bunch of dates growing on the tree consists of many
'twigs', each with dates along its length
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Date_palm>
The flowers point upwards, the weight of the fruit brings them down.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Axlegrease
2021-06-23 10:02:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
On Tue, 22 Jun 2021 17:19:07 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
(Why do dates traditionally come in boxes/trays that shape - is it to
hold the plastic twig?)
I think the only dates that come packed like that are those preserved ones all soaked in glucose syrup and the twiggy thing is there so you can pick them up without getting your fingers covered in sticky goo.
For decades, I thought I didn't like dates because they tasted of nothing but an overdose of sugar. Then I discovered proper, fresh dates which come packed in rectangular boxes or cellophane-type bags with no twiggy thing because they aren't sticky and taste .... well, of dates and quite delicious.
Mike McMillan
2021-06-23 15:46:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by Axlegrease
Post by Penny
On Tue, 22 Jun 2021 17:19:07 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
(Why do dates traditionally come in boxes/trays that shape - is it to
hold the plastic twig?)
I think the only dates that come packed like that are those preserved
ones all soaked in glucose syrup and the twiggy thing is there so you can
pick them up without getting your fingers covered in sticky goo.
For decades, I thought I didn't like dates because they tasted of nothing
but an overdose of sugar. Then I discovered proper, fresh dates which
come packed in rectangular boxes or cellophane-type bags with no twiggy
thing because they aren't sticky and taste .... well, of dates and quite delicious.
I was once given a box of Medjool dates - they are v-e-r-r-y m-o-o-r-i-s-h
indeed (and rather pricey too!)
--
Toddle Pip, Mike McMillan
Paul Herber
2021-06-23 16:54:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Axlegrease
Post by Penny
On Tue, 22 Jun 2021 17:19:07 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
(Why do dates traditionally come in boxes/trays that shape - is it to
hold the plastic twig?)
I think the only dates that come packed like that are those preserved
ones all soaked in glucose syrup and the twiggy thing is there so you can
pick them up without getting your fingers covered in sticky goo.
For decades, I thought I didn't like dates because they tasted of nothing
but an overdose of sugar. Then I discovered proper, fresh dates which
come packed in rectangular boxes or cellophane-type bags with no twiggy
thing because they aren't sticky and taste .... well, of dates and quite delicious.
I was once given a box of Medjool dates - they are v-e-r-r-y m-o-o-r-i-s-h
indeed (and rather pricey too!)
I see what you did there! We've had them fresh in Morocco.
--
Regards, Paul Herber
https://www.paulherber.co.uk/
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2021-06-23 22:59:00 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 23 Jun 2021 at 15:46:29, Mike McMillan
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Axlegrease
Post by Penny
On Tue, 22 Jun 2021 17:19:07 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
(Why do dates traditionally come in boxes/trays that shape - is it to
hold the plastic twig?)
I think the only dates that come packed like that are those preserved
ones all soaked in glucose syrup and the twiggy thing is there so you can
Until recently, I think that was the only sort that you could get in
England.
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Axlegrease
pick them up without getting your fingers covered in sticky goo.
I tried using it this evening; I found it as much
more-bother-than-it's-worth as I remembered.
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Axlegrease
For decades, I thought I didn't like dates because they tasted of nothing
but an overdose of sugar. Then I discovered proper, fresh dates which
come packed in rectangular boxes or cellophane-type bags with no twiggy
thing because they aren't sticky and taste .... well, of dates and quite delicious.
I was once given a box of Medjool dates - they are v-e-r-r-y m-o-o-r-i-s-h
indeed (and rather pricey too!)
I think the default ones being sold by (at least) Sainsbury and AsDa are
indeed Medjool, and not that expensive (1.5x a 200g box in S., IIRR).

(Was that a clever pun about them being moorish!)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

I hope you dream a pig.
Mike McMillan
2021-06-24 07:37:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
On Wed, 23 Jun 2021 at 15:46:29, Mike McMillan
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Axlegrease
Post by Penny
On Tue, 22 Jun 2021 17:19:07 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
(Why do dates traditionally come in boxes/trays that shape - is it to
hold the plastic twig?)
I think the only dates that come packed like that are those preserved
ones all soaked in glucose syrup and the twiggy thing is there so you can
Until recently, I think that was the only sort that you could get in
England.
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Axlegrease
pick them up without getting your fingers covered in sticky goo.
I tried using it this evening; I found it as much
more-bother-than-it's-worth as I remembered.
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Axlegrease
For decades, I thought I didn't like dates because they tasted of nothing
but an overdose of sugar. Then I discovered proper, fresh dates which
come packed in rectangular boxes or cellophane-type bags with no twiggy
thing because they aren't sticky and taste .... well, of dates and quite delicious.
I was once given a box of Medjool dates - they are v-e-r-r-y m-o-o-r-i-s-h
indeed (and rather pricey too!)
I think the default ones being sold by (at least) Sainsbury and AsDa are
indeed Medjool, and not that expensive (1.5x a 200g box in S., IIRR).
(Was that a clever pun about them being moorish!)
Well, I wasn’t going to mention it but… (blows on fingernails and polishes
them on smoking jacket).
--
Toddle Pip, Mike McMillan
Sam Plusnet
2021-06-24 20:29:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike McMillan
Well, I wasn’t going to mention it but… (blows on fingernails and polishes
them on smoking jacket).
I should polish with a tad less vigour if I were you.
Pour some water on that jacket first.
--
Sam Plusnet
Penny
2021-06-24 10:23:49 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 23 Jun 2021 23:59:00 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I think the default ones being sold by (at least) Sainsbury and AsDa are
indeed Medjool, and not that expensive (1.5x a 200g box in S., IIRR).
Thank your local Muslims, I think it's a part of Ramadan break fast -
though that would probably be fresh dates, which I've never seen on offer
anywhere.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
steve hague
2021-06-24 12:11:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
On Wed, 23 Jun 2021 23:59:00 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I think the default ones being sold by (at least) Sainsbury and AsDa are
indeed Medjool, and not that expensive (1.5x a 200g box in S., IIRR).
Thank your local Muslims, I think it's a part of Ramadan break fast -
though that would probably be fresh dates, which I've never seen on offer
anywhere.
I've only encountered the syrupy slimy ones, which are imho not really
edible. I enjoy most fruit, so would like to try fresh dates, but
there's not much chance of that around here. We've proper pasties
though, and know which order jam and cream should be put on a scone.
Steve
Sam Plusnet
2021-06-24 20:33:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by steve hague
I've only encountered the syrupy slimy ones, which are imho not really
edible. I enjoy most fruit, so would like to try fresh dates, but
there's not much chance of that around here. We've proper pasties
though, and know which order jam and cream should be put on a scone.
<envy> I refuse to eat any pasty without Cornwall, & there's a lot
within Cornwall which don't live up to Philps' standard.
--
Sam Plusnet
steve hague
2021-06-25 06:19:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by steve hague
I've only encountered the syrupy slimy ones, which are imho not really
edible. I enjoy most fruit, so would like to try fresh dates, but
there's not much chance of that around here. We've proper pasties
though, and know which order jam and cream should be put on a scone.
<envy>  I refuse to eat any pasty without Cornwall, & there's a lot
within Cornwall which don't live up to Philps' standard.
Prima Bakeries do an excellent pasty, and will send batches of frozen
ones all over the country. Cheap too, currently £1.25 for a medium size
steak pasty.
Steve
Sam Plusnet
2021-06-25 19:18:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by steve hague
Post by steve hague
I've only encountered the syrupy slimy ones, which are imho not
really edible. I enjoy most fruit, so would like to try fresh dates,
but there's not much chance of that around here. We've proper pasties
though, and know which order jam and cream should be put on a scone.
<envy>  I refuse to eat any pasty without Cornwall, & there's a lot
within Cornwall which don't live up to Philps' standard.
Prima Bakeries do an excellent pasty, and will send batches of frozen
ones all over the country. Cheap too, currently £1.25 for a medium size
steak pasty.
Philps will deliver, but 6 medium steak pasties from Prima seem to cost
£20 by post.
Philps want £35 for (roughly) the same thing.

I shall discuss with SWMBO.
--
Sam Plusnet
Hellerat
2021-06-27 14:14:42 UTC
Permalink
I've only encountered the syrupy slimy ones, which are imho not really edible. I enjoy
most fruit, so would like to try fresh dates, but there's not much chance of that
around here. We've proper pasties though, and know which order jam and cream should be
put on a scone.
<envy>  I refuse to eat any pasty without Cornwall, & there's a lot within Cornwall
which don't live up to Philps' standard.
Prima Bakeries do an excellent pasty, and will send batches of frozen ones all over the
country. Cheap too, currently £1.25 for a medium size steak pasty.
Philps will deliver, but 6 medium steak pasties from Prima seem to cost £20 by post.
Philps want £35 for (roughly) the same thing.
I shall discuss with SWMBO.
Digressing, sorry, having a fit of reminiscence.

Devon Savouries. Pasties fresh from the oven in their shop opposite the Wills Memorial
Building in Bristol. Drool. (This was over 40 years ago, gone now, as far as I can tell
from Street View, it's been replaced by a Pret or a falafel bar or possibly a Body Shop, I
can't remember exactly where it used to be. Carwardines Coffee Shop is gone too, replaced
by a Wetherspoons, it seems. At least the ghastly old University Refectory has been
replaced by a Browns! Same architecture, better food!)
--
Yassas,
Anne, Exceptionally Traditionally-built Hellerat
Sam Plusnet
2021-06-27 19:09:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by Hellerat
Digressing, sorry, having a fit of reminiscence.
Devon Savouries. Pasties fresh from the oven in their shop opposite the
Wills Memorial Building in Bristol. Drool. (This was over 40 years ago,
gone now, as far as I can tell from Street View, it's been replaced by a
Pret or a falafel bar or possibly a Body Shop, I can't remember exactly
where it used to be. Carwardines Coffee Shop is gone too, replaced by a
Wetherspoons, it seems. At least the ghastly old University Refectory
has been replaced by a Browns! Same architecture, better food!)
If I go back to some town or city that I used to know quite well, some
decades ago, I always am completely lost & cannot find a thing.

I'm better off in some place I have never visited before, since I don't
start off with false expectations.
--
Sam Plusnet
Penny
2021-06-28 08:16:39 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 27 Jun 2021 20:09:22 +0100, Sam Plusnet <***@home.com> scrawled in
the dust...
Post by Sam Plusnet
If I go back to some town or city that I used to know quite well, some
decades ago, I always am completely lost & cannot find a thing.
In my teens, we lived close enough to Cambridge to visit it for shopping.
It changed a fair bit in those years, with bits being demolished and a new
shopping area being built. The last time I tried to visit it, some years
ago now, I failed because we couldn't find anywhere to park and we went to
Saffron Walden instead. I used to go there for shopping in my teens, too,
but not as frequently as Cambridge. I had no trouble finding the places I
wanted, it really didn't seem to have changed at all.
Post by Sam Plusnet
I'm better off in some place I have never visited before, since I don't
start off with false expectations.
You have a point there.
I went to my local Morrisons (clockwise) a couple of days ago - my first
outing since being ill - in the intervening couple of weeks they had
entirely reorganised the store. It's going to take me a while to discover
where they've put everything, and one of the aisles must be a new invention
as it is now too narrow to exercise social distancing.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Mike McMillan
2021-06-28 08:39:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
the dust...
Post by Sam Plusnet
If I go back to some town or city that I used to know quite well, some
decades ago, I always am completely lost & cannot find a thing.
In my teens, we lived close enough to Cambridge to visit it for shopping.
It changed a fair bit in those years, with bits being demolished and a new
shopping area being built. The last time I tried to visit it, some years
ago now, I failed because we couldn't find anywhere to park and we went to
Saffron Walden instead. I used to go there for shopping in my teens, too,
but not as frequently as Cambridge. I had no trouble finding the places I
wanted, it really didn't seem to have changed at all.
Post by Sam Plusnet
I'm better off in some place I have never visited before, since I don't
start off with false expectations.
You have a point there.
I went to my local Morrisons (clockwise) a couple of days ago - my first
outing since being ill - in the intervening couple of weeks they had
entirely reorganised the store. It's going to take me a while to discover
where they've put everything, and one of the aisles must be a new invention
as it is now too narrow to exercise social distancing.
At least you are probably less likely to find cow pats in your way than in
Cambridge!
--
Toddle Pip, Mike McMillan
Mike McMillan
2021-06-28 08:40:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Penny
the dust...
Post by Sam Plusnet
If I go back to some town or city that I used to know quite well, some
decades ago, I always am completely lost & cannot find a thing.
In my teens, we lived close enough to Cambridge to visit it for shopping.
It changed a fair bit in those years, with bits being demolished and a new
shopping area being built. The last time I tried to visit it, some years
ago now, I failed because we couldn't find anywhere to park and we went to
Saffron Walden instead. I used to go there for shopping in my teens, too,
but not as frequently as Cambridge. I had no trouble finding the places I
wanted, it really didn't seem to have changed at all.
Post by Sam Plusnet
I'm better off in some place I have never visited before, since I don't
start off with false expectations.
You have a point there.
I went to my local Morrisons (clockwise) a couple of days ago - my first
outing since being ill - in the intervening couple of weeks they had
entirely reorganised the store. It's going to take me a while to discover
where they've put everything, and one of the aisles must be a new invention
as it is now too narrow to exercise social distancing.
At least you are probably less likely to find cow pats in your way than in
Cambridge!
Though I suppose in MK, you might stub your toe on concrete ones - ouch!
--
Toddle Pip, Mike McMillan
Penny
2021-06-28 14:49:54 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 28 Jun 2021 08:39:11 -0000 (UTC), Mike McMillan
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Penny
I went to my local Morrisons (clockwise) a couple of days ago - my first
outing since being ill - in the intervening couple of weeks they had
entirely reorganised the store. It's going to take me a while to discover
where they've put everything, and one of the aisles must be a new invention
as it is now too narrow to exercise social distancing.
At least you are probably less likely to find cow pats in your way than in
Cambridge!
That reminds me of the day I drove, in a very bad mood generated by my
father's wife, from his home in north Herts to mine in Kent with daughters
on board. I was intending to use the (old) A11, a route I knew well, but
due to my mood, lack of appropriate signage and the demolition of a
landmark building, I managed to miss a turning somewhere in urban south
Essex and ended up on some other road entirely, in an effort to avoid a
lengthy Sunday procession of cadets or similar. We approached a roundabout
around which were wandering half a dozen Friesians which may have been
grazing the roundabout and decided to jump the fence.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Nick Odell
2021-06-28 10:04:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
the dust...
Post by Sam Plusnet
If I go back to some town or city that I used to know quite well, some
decades ago, I always am completely lost & cannot find a thing.
In my teens, we lived close enough to Cambridge to visit it for shopping.
It changed a fair bit in those years, with bits being demolished and a new
shopping area being built. The last time I tried to visit it, some years
ago now, I failed because we couldn't find anywhere to park and we went to
Saffron Walden instead. I used to go there for shopping in my teens, too,
but not as frequently as Cambridge. I had no trouble finding the places I
wanted, it really didn't seem to have changed at all.
Post by Sam Plusnet
I'm better off in some place I have never visited before, since I don't
start off with false expectations.
You have a point there.
I went to my local Morrisons (clockwise) a couple of days ago - my first
outing since being ill - in the intervening couple of weeks they had
entirely reorganised the store. It's going to take me a while to discover
where they've put everything, and one of the aisles must be a new invention
as it is now too narrow to exercise social distancing.
I maintain social distancing by turning up at the town centre
supermarkets[1] at their 6am opening time or going to the 24hr
out-of-town supermarket[1] in the middle of the night though it's not
entirely convenient for me to do either and I think it has been
playing havoc with my sleep patterns.

Nick
[1]Each conveniently within walking distance though in opposite
directions
Vicky Ayech
2021-06-28 10:28:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
I went to my local Morrisons (clockwise) a couple of days ago - my first
outing since being ill - in the intervening couple of weeks they had
entirely reorganised the store. It's going to take me a while to discover
where they've put everything, and one of the aisles must be a new invention
as it is now too narrow to exercise social distancing.
They do that in the next-door Sainsburys and the nearby Asda. Change
it all around. It means peple have to stay longer walking around
searching for things so surely corvid bad. They want you to wander
round though as you are more likely to impulse buy then as well as the
things on your list. You might also have to ask assistants for help,
if you can find one. Also not covid good.
Penny
2021-06-28 14:24:21 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 28 Jun 2021 11:28:24 +0100, Vicky Ayech <***@gmail.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by Penny
I went to my local Morrisons (clockwise) a couple of days ago - my first
outing since being ill - in the intervening couple of weeks they had
entirely reorganised the store. It's going to take me a while to discover
where they've put everything, and one of the aisles must be a new invention
as it is now too narrow to exercise social distancing.
They do that in the next-door Sainsburys and the nearby Asda. Change
it all around. It means peple have to stay longer walking around
searching for things so surely corvid bad. They want you to wander
round though as you are more likely to impulse buy then as well as the
things on your list. You might also have to ask assistants for help,
if you can find one. Also not covid good.
The only person on the floor who looked like they worked there, as she was
restocking herbs and spices, turned out to be employed by the herb & spice
company. She did vaguely try to help and agreed with me about the horror of
moving everything.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Jenny M Benson
2021-06-28 15:27:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
The only person on the floor who looked like they worked there, as she was
restocking herbs and spices, turned out to be employed by the herb & spice
company. She did vaguely try to help and agreed with me about the horror of
moving everything.
Similar experience fairly recently at a Dobbie's Garden Centre, where
it's often difficult to locate a member of staff when one is needed. It
turned out that the chap stacking pots was from the pots company, not
Dobbie's, but he very obligingly offered to lift down the heavy bag of
compost from the top of the stack.
--
Jenny M Benson
Wrexham, UK
Joe Kerr
2021-06-28 19:25:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by Penny
I went to my local Morrisons (clockwise) a couple of days ago - my first
outing since being ill - in the intervening couple of weeks they had
entirely reorganised the store. It's going to take me a while to discover
where they've put everything, and one of the aisles must be a new invention
as it is now too narrow to exercise social distancing.
They do that in the next-door Sainsburys and the nearby Asda. Change
it all around. It means peple have to stay longer walking around
searching for things so surely corvid bad. They want you to wander
round though as you are more likely to impulse buy then as well as the
things on your list. You might also have to ask assistants for help,
if you can find one. Also not covid good.
I've clearly been doing it all wrong. Whenever a supermarket changes its
layout I storm off and shop somewhere else. Until they change their layout.
--
Ric
tiny hadron
2021-07-11 20:26:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Hellerat
Digressing, sorry, having a fit of reminiscence.
Devon Savouries. Pasties fresh from the oven in their shop opposite the
Wills Memorial Building in Bristol. Drool. (This was over 40 years ago,
gone now, as far as I can tell from Street View, it's been replaced by a
Pret or a falafel bar or possibly a Body Shop, I can't remember exactly
where it used to be. Carwardines Coffee Shop is gone too, replaced by a
Wetherspoons, it seems. At least the ghastly old University Refectory
has been replaced by a Browns! Same architecture, better food!)
Not to forget
<https://shop.openhouselondon.org.uk/products/copy-of-surbiton-station-model>,
to make a corner of the home that's forever England.

But back to dates. Aren't the boxes themselves rather date shaped? I
hunted for pictures of drooping bunches that looked the same shape,
though couldn't find any. But while looking for droopy drupes I did
come across this image, that I found rather beguiling.
<Loading Image...>.
Does any one do home black pepper making?
Hellerat
2021-08-13 15:36:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by tiny hadron
Post by Hellerat
Digressing, sorry, having a fit of reminiscence.
Devon Savouries. Pasties fresh from the oven in their shop opposite the
Wills Memorial Building in Bristol. Drool. (This was over 40 years ago,
gone now, as far as I can tell from Street View, it's been replaced by a
Pret or a falafel bar or possibly a Body Shop, I can't remember exactly
where it used to be. Carwardines Coffee Shop is gone too, replaced by a
Wetherspoons, it seems. At least the ghastly old University Refectory
has been replaced by a Browns! Same architecture, better food!)
Not to forget
<https://shop.openhouselondon.org.uk/products/copy-of-surbiton-station-model>, to make a
corner of the home that's forever England.
I've only just seen this! Thank you, that model is amazing! There are some great FB groups
with photos of Surbiton and Kingston past which are really fun to look at, too. Little did
I know as I commuted from Surbiton to school and later to work, that the station I used
almost daily was iconic!
Post by tiny hadron
But back to dates.  Aren't the boxes themselves rather date shaped?  I hunted for pictures
of drooping bunches that looked the same shape, though couldn't find any.  But while
looking for droopy drupes I did come across this image, that I found rather beguiling.
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drupe#/media/File:Black_Pepper_(Piper_nigrum)_fruits.jpg>.
 Does any one do home black pepper making?
This is the "traditional" date box I remember from Christmas in Times Past:

http://www.nationaltrustcollections.org.uk/object/546088

No, I'm afraid pickled pepper is not in my repertoire :-)

Darn, I'm still yearning for a Devon Savoury pasty now, 6 weeks after I first posted!
--
Yassas,
Anne, Exceptionally Traditionally-built Hellerat
Kate B
2021-08-13 21:22:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Hellerat
Post by tiny hadron
Not to forget
<https://shop.openhouselondon.org.uk/products/copy-of-surbiton-station-model>,
to make a corner of the home that's forever England.
I've only just seen this! Thank you, that model is amazing! There are
some great FB groups with photos of Surbiton and Kingston past which are
really fun to look at, too. Little did I know as I commuted from
Surbiton to school and later to work, that the station I used almost
daily was iconic!
Or 'Suburbiton' as Arlene Fleming had it this morning on Toady...
--
Kate B
London
Marmaduke Jinks
2021-08-14 09:03:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kate B
Post by Hellerat
Post by tiny hadron
Not to forget
<https://shop.openhouselondon.org.uk/products/copy-of-surbiton-station-model>,
to make a corner of the home that's forever England.
I've only just seen this! Thank you, that model is amazing! There are
some great FB groups with photos of Surbiton and Kingston past which are
really fun to look at, too. Little did I know as I commuted from Surbiton
to school and later to work, that the station I used almost daily was
iconic!
Or 'Suburbiton' as Arlene Fleming had it this morning on Toady...
--
Kate B
London
I did hear her say that. Having lived there in the 1980s this made Oi larf.

MJ
Hellerat
2021-08-14 11:59:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kate B
Post by Hellerat
Post by tiny hadron
Not to forget
<https://shop.openhouselondon.org.uk/products/copy-of-surbiton-station-model>, to make
a corner of the home that's forever England.
I've only just seen this! Thank you, that model is amazing! There are some great FB
groups with photos of Surbiton and Kingston past which are really fun to look at, too.
Little did I know as I commuted from Surbiton to school and later to work, that the
station I used almost daily was iconic!
Or 'Suburbiton' as Arlene Fleming had it this morning on Toady...
Did that not come from: "The Good Life", OAM?
--
Yassas,
Anne, Exceptionally Traditionally-built Hellerat
Kate B
2021-08-14 12:09:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Hellerat
Post by Kate B
Post by Hellerat
Post by tiny hadron
Not to forget
<https://shop.openhouselondon.org.uk/products/copy-of-surbiton-station-model>,
to make a corner of the home that's forever England.
I've only just seen this! Thank you, that model is amazing! There are
some great FB groups with photos of Surbiton and Kingston past which
are really fun to look at, too. Little did I know as I commuted from
Surbiton to school and later to work, that the station I used almost
daily was iconic!
Or 'Suburbiton' as Arlene Fleming had it this morning on Toady...
Did that not come from: "The Good Life", OAM?
You mean she did it accidentally on purpose? She goes up hugely in my
estimation :)
--
Kate B
London
Sam Plusnet
2021-08-14 19:45:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Hellerat
Post by Kate B
Post by Hellerat
Post by tiny hadron
Not to forget
<https://shop.openhouselondon.org.uk/products/copy-of-surbiton-station-model>,
to make a corner of the home that's forever England.
I've only just seen this! Thank you, that model is amazing! There are
some great FB groups with photos of Surbiton and Kingston past which
are really fun to look at, too. Little did I know as I commuted from
Surbiton to school and later to work, that the station I used almost
daily was iconic!
Or 'Suburbiton' as Arlene Fleming had it this morning on Toady...
Did that not come from: "The Good Life", OAM?
As a child, I was never quite convinced that it was a real place. It
did sound very much like an invented name, loosely based on suburb.

"Dorchester" also seemed pretty unconvincing... somewhere close to
Barchester no doubt.
--
Sam Plusnet
Mike McMillan
2021-08-15 07:21:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Hellerat
Post by Kate B
Post by Hellerat
Post by tiny hadron
Not to forget
<https://shop.openhouselondon.org.uk/products/copy-of-surbiton-station-model>,
to make a corner of the home that's forever England.
I've only just seen this! Thank you, that model is amazing! There are
some great FB groups with photos of Surbiton and Kingston past which
are really fun to look at, too. Little did I know as I commuted from
Surbiton to school and later to work, that the station I used almost
daily was iconic!
Or 'Suburbiton' as Arlene Fleming had it this morning on Toady...
Did that not come from: "The Good Life", OAM?
As a child, I was never quite convinced that it was a real place. It
did sound very much like an invented name, loosely based on suburb.
"Dorchester" also seemed pretty unconvincing... somewhere close to
Barchester no doubt.
Perhaps if it had been spelt Doorchester, you might have been able to get
more of a handle on it.
--
Toodle Pip, Mike McMillan
Paul Herber
2021-08-15 13:50:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Hellerat
Post by Kate B
Post by Hellerat
Post by tiny hadron
Not to forget
<https://shop.openhouselondon.org.uk/products/copy-of-surbiton-station-model>,
to make a corner of the home that's forever England.
I've only just seen this! Thank you, that model is amazing! There are
some great FB groups with photos of Surbiton and Kingston past which
are really fun to look at, too. Little did I know as I commuted from
Surbiton to school and later to work, that the station I used almost
daily was iconic!
Or 'Suburbiton' as Arlene Fleming had it this morning on Toady...
Did that not come from: "The Good Life", OAM?
As a child, I was never quite convinced that it was a real place. It
did sound very much like an invented name, loosely based on suburb.
"Dorchester" also seemed pretty unconvincing... somewhere close to
Barchester no doubt.
Perhaps if it had been spelt Doorchester, you might have been able to get
more of a handle on it.
The more punning I do, the more I feel slightly unhinged.
--
Regards, Paul Herber
https://www.paulherber.co.uk/
Mike McMillan
2021-08-15 14:17:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Paul Herber
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Hellerat
Post by Kate B
Post by Hellerat
Post by tiny hadron
Not to forget
<https://shop.openhouselondon.org.uk/products/copy-of-surbiton-station-model>,
to make a corner of the home that's forever England.
I've only just seen this! Thank you, that model is amazing! There are
some great FB groups with photos of Surbiton and Kingston past which
are really fun to look at, too. Little did I know as I commuted from
Surbiton to school and later to work, that the station I used almost
daily was iconic!
Or 'Suburbiton' as Arlene Fleming had it this morning on Toady...
Did that not come from: "The Good Life", OAM?
As a child, I was never quite convinced that it was a real place. It
did sound very much like an invented name, loosely based on suburb.
"Dorchester" also seemed pretty unconvincing... somewhere close to
Barchester no doubt.
Perhaps if it had been spelt Doorchester, you might have been able to get
more of a handle on it.
The more punning I do, the more I feel slightly unhinged.
Ooh, that jarrs I’m afraid, but then, the mortice we do, the more I night
latch onto it,; but I don’t want to get in a jamb about it - you might
make a bolt for the door; I think I’m rimming over with puns- I’d better
shut it for now.
--
Toodle Pip, Mike McMillan
Mike McMillan
2021-06-25 07:24:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by steve hague
I've only encountered the syrupy slimy ones, which are imho not really
edible. I enjoy most fruit, so would like to try fresh dates, but
there's not much chance of that around here. We've proper pasties
though, and know which order jam and cream should be put on a scone.
<envy> I refuse to eat any pasty without Cornwall, & there's a lot
within Cornwall which don't live up to Philps' standard.
To my way of thinking, the only good thing about G*nsters is the muriel on
the walls of a house in Callington…. (Though to call what they produce a
‘pasty’ is a travesty anyway.)
--
Toddle Pip, Mike McMillan
Jenny M Benson
2021-06-24 23:03:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by steve hague
I've only encountered the syrupy slimy ones, which are imho not really
edible. I enjoy most fruit, so would like to try fresh dates, but
there's not much chance of that around here. We've proper pasties
though, and know which order jam and cream should be put on a scone.
Were you "saying" scon or scown, there? IMNTK.
--
Jenny M Benson
Wrexham, UK
steve hague
2021-06-25 06:20:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by steve hague
I've only encountered the syrupy slimy ones, which are imho not really
edible. I enjoy most fruit, so would like to try fresh dates, but
there's not much chance of that around here. We've proper pasties
though, and know which order jam and cream should be put on a scone.
Were you "saying" scon or scown, there?  IMNTK.
Scohn.
steve hague
2021-06-28 18:08:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I think the default ones being sold by (at least) Sainsbury and AsDa are
indeed Medjool, and not that expensive (1.5x a 200g box in S., IIRR).
(Was that a clever pun about them being moorish!)
According to today's news, the supermarkets have recalled Medjool due to
horrendous poisons in them. Curses, foiled again.
Mike McMillan
2021-06-29 07:27:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by steve hague
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I think the default ones being sold by (at least) Sainsbury and AsDa are
indeed Medjool, and not that expensive (1.5x a 200g box in S., IIRR).
(Was that a clever pun about them being moorish!)
According to today's news, the supermarkets have recalled Medjool due to
horrendous poisons in them. Curses, foiled again.
Expended Uranium?
--
Toddle Pip, Mike McMillan
Hellerat
2021-06-24 08:00:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Axlegrease
Post by Penny
On Tue, 22 Jun 2021 17:19:07 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
(Why do dates traditionally come in boxes/trays that shape - is it to
hold the plastic twig?)
I think the only dates that come packed like that are those preserved
ones all soaked in glucose syrup and the twiggy thing is there so you can
pick them up without getting your fingers covered in sticky goo.
For decades, I thought I didn't like dates because they tasted of nothing
but an overdose of sugar. Then I discovered proper, fresh dates which
come packed in rectangular boxes or cellophane-type bags with no twiggy
thing because they aren't sticky and taste .... well, of dates and quite delicious.
I was once given a box of Medjool dates - they are v-e-r-r-y m-o-o-r-i-s-h
indeed (and rather pricey too!)
Oh, for the fresh dates we used to regularly buy when we lived in Dubai! Bliss!
--
Yassas,
Anne, Exceptionally Traditionally-built Hellerat
Joe Kerr
2021-06-23 21:11:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Axlegrease
Post by Penny
On Tue, 22 Jun 2021 17:19:07 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
(Why do dates traditionally come in boxes/trays that shape - is it to
hold the plastic twig?)
I think the only dates that come packed like that are those preserved ones all soaked in glucose syrup and the twiggy thing is there so you can pick them up without getting your fingers covered in sticky goo.
For decades, I thought I didn't like dates because they tasted of nothing but an overdose of sugar. Then I discovered proper, fresh dates which come packed in rectangular boxes or cellophane-type bags with no twiggy thing because they aren't sticky and taste .... well, of dates and quite delicious.
Ooh! I like fresh dates. They were available for a few years then
disappeared. From where can they be purchased?
--
Ric
Mike McMillan
2021-06-24 07:35:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Joe Kerr
Post by Axlegrease
Post by Penny
On Tue, 22 Jun 2021 17:19:07 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
(Why do dates traditionally come in boxes/trays that shape - is it to
hold the plastic twig?)
I think the only dates that come packed like that are those preserved
ones all soaked in glucose syrup and the twiggy thing is there so you
can pick them up without getting your fingers covered in sticky goo.
For decades, I thought I didn't like dates because they tasted of
nothing but an overdose of sugar. Then I discovered proper, fresh dates
which come packed in rectangular boxes or cellophane-type bags with no
twiggy thing because they aren't sticky and taste .... well, of dates and quite delicious.
Ooh! I like fresh dates. They were available for a few years then
disappeared. From where can they be purchased?
Try looking them up on a date-a-base. (Sorry, IGMC)
--
Toddle Pip, Mike McMillan
Chris
2021-06-24 08:18:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Joe Kerr
Post by Axlegrease
Post by Penny
On Tue, 22 Jun 2021 17:19:07 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
(Why do dates traditionally come in boxes/trays that shape - is it to
hold the plastic twig?)
I think the only dates that come packed like that are those preserved
ones all soaked in glucose syrup and the twiggy thing is there so you
can pick them up without getting your fingers covered in sticky goo.
For decades, I thought I didn't like dates because they tasted of
nothing but an overdose of sugar. Then I discovered proper, fresh dates
which come packed in rectangular boxes or cellophane-type bags with no
twiggy thing because they aren't sticky and taste .... well, of dates and quite delicious.
Ooh! I like fresh dates. They were available for a few years then
disappeared. From where can they be purchased?
Shops selling the furrin in Lunnnon but at a guess any large S Asian shop.
In Reading I’d suggest the far west on Oxford Rd. Unless it’s changed
it’s name: The E optic supermarket. Have had no cause to go that far for
at least two years though.

Sincerely Chris
Sam Plusnet
2021-06-24 20:38:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Joe Kerr
Post by Axlegrease
Post by Penny
On Tue, 22 Jun 2021 17:19:07 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
(Why do dates traditionally come in boxes/trays that shape - is it to
hold the plastic twig?)
I think the only dates that come packed like that are those preserved
ones all soaked in glucose syrup and the twiggy thing is there so you
can pick them  up without getting your fingers covered in sticky goo.
For decades, I thought I didn't like dates because they tasted of
nothing but an overdose of sugar. Then I discovered proper, fresh
dates which come packed in rectangular boxes or cellophane-type bags
with no twiggy thing because they aren't sticky and taste .... well,
of dates and quite delicious.
Ooh! I like fresh dates. They were available for a few years then
disappeared. From where can they be purchased?
Posh supermarkets usually sell them.

<checks> G'Lord! I came across _this_.

"Duchy Organic Medjool Dates online from Waitrose today."

Where does Charles grow his dates? Are there date palms in Cornwall?

ITWSBT.
--
Sam Plusnet
Tony Smith
2021-06-25 09:24:22 UTC
Permalink
Where does Charles grow his dates? Are there date palms in Cornwall?
I have seen palms growing quite healthily in the streets of Belfast and Glasgow, but whether they were date palms I do not recall.
Jim Easterbrook
2021-06-25 10:14:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony Smith
Where does Charles grow his dates? Are there date palms in Cornwall?
I have seen palms growing quite healthily in the streets of Belfast and
Glasgow, but whether they were date palms I do not recall.
There's an ornamental tree called a Canary Island date palm which is
frost resistant. There are also true date palms which bear fruit and
aren't hardy. I have one of the latter in my living room, grown from a
date stone 30 or more years ago.
--
Jim <http://www.jim-easterbrook.me.uk/>
1959/1985? M B+ G+ A L- I- S- P-- CH0(p) Ar++ T+ H0 Q--- Sh0
Penny
2021-06-25 10:37:12 UTC
Permalink
On 25 Jun 2021 10:14:19 GMT, Jim Easterbrook <***@jim-easterbrook.me.uk>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jim Easterbrook
There's an ornamental tree called a Canary Island date palm which is
frost resistant. There are also true date palms which bear fruit and
aren't hardy. I have one of the latter in my living room, grown from a
date stone 30 or more years ago.
<impressed>
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2021-06-25 14:44:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jim Easterbrook
There's an ornamental tree called a Canary Island date palm which is
frost resistant. There are also true date palms which bear fruit and
aren't hardy. I have one of the latter in my living room, grown from a
date stone 30 or more years ago.
<impressed>
Likewise.

How big? How many dates a year (or does it need a tree of the opposite
gender to pollinate)?
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

The desire to remain private and/or anonymous used to be a core British value,
but in recent times it has been treated with suspicion - an unfortunate by-
product of the widespread desire for fame. - Chris Middleton,
Computing 6 September 2011
Jim Easterbrook
2021-06-25 15:07:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Penny
On 25 Jun 2021 10:14:19 GMT, Jim Easterbrook
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jim Easterbrook
There's an ornamental tree called a Canary Island date palm which is
frost resistant. There are also true date palms which bear fruit and
aren't hardy. I have one of the latter in my living room, grown from a
date stone 30 or more years ago.
<impressed>
Likewise.
How big? How many dates a year (or does it need a tree of the opposite
gender to pollinate)?
No dates. No sign of anything like a flower. It's severely potbound but
as it's nearly touching the ceiling I'm not minded to encourage more
growth.

According to Wikipedia there's a 50% chance I've got a male plant anyway.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Date_palm
--
Jim <http://www.jim-easterbrook.me.uk/>
1959/1985? M B+ G+ A L- I- S- P-- CH0(p) Ar++ T+ H0 Q--- Sh0
Mike McMillan
2021-06-25 15:58:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Penny
On 25 Jun 2021 10:14:19 GMT, Jim Easterbrook
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jim Easterbrook
There's an ornamental tree called a Canary Island date palm which is
frost resistant. There are also true date palms which bear fruit and
aren't hardy. I have one of the latter in my living room, grown from a
date stone 30 or more years ago.
<impressed>
Likewise.
How big? How many dates a year (or does it need a tree of the opposite
gender to pollinate)?
No dates. No sign of anything like a flower. It's severely potbound but
as it's nearly touching the ceiling I'm not minded to encourage more
growth.
According to Wikipedia there's a 50% chance I've got a male plant anyway.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Date_palm
But, equally well, you must have a 50% chance of having a female plant!
--
Toddle Pip, Mike McMillan
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2021-06-23 11:55:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
On Wed, 23 Jun 2021 01:58:28 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Penny
On Tue, 22 Jun 2021 17:19:07 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
(Why do dates traditionally come in boxes/trays that shape - is it to
hold the plastic twig?)
I think it is the general shape of a bunch of dates on the palm - if my
grandfather's sketches are anything to go by.
Interesting! Thanks.
Having found the drawing I was thinking of, it doesn't really show what I
thought it did but a bunch of dates growing on the tree consists of many
'twigs', each with dates along its length
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Date_palm>
The flowers point upwards, the weight of the fruit brings them down.
Thanks - interesting article!
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

<Squawk> Pieces of eight!
<Squawk> Pieces of eight!
<Squawk> Pieces of nine!
<SYSTEM HALTED: parroty error!>
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