Discussion:
not yer average day in Woodley, Berks
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Chris
2021-05-14 15:20:34 UTC
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https://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/1436071/Cow-police-car-crash-Woodley-Berkshire-runaway-traffic-chaos?IYA-mail=44db4086-0765-47f0-ad12-74da0fae3572

Seen in our local rag, but we don’t live in this area.

Sincerely Chris
Mike McMillan
2021-05-14 15:30:19 UTC
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Post by Chris
https://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/1436071/Cow-police-car-crash-Woodley-Berkshire-runaway-traffic-chaos?IYA-mail=44db4086-0765-47f0-ad12-74da0fae3572
Seen in our local rag, but we don’t live in this area.
Sincerely Chris
Where’s David when you need him????!!!
--
Toodle Pip (My other iPad is an old Pro)
Paul Herber
2021-05-14 19:47:38 UTC
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Post by Chris
https://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/1436071/Cow-police-car-crash-Woodley-Berkshire-runaway-traffic-chaos?IYA-mail=44db4086-0765-47f0-ad12-74da0fae3572
Seen in our local rag, but we don’t live in this area.
Sincerely Chris
Where’s David when you need him????!!!
Steer him in the right direction.
--
Regards, Paul Herber
https://www.paulherber.co.uk/
Mike McMillan
2021-05-15 07:39:09 UTC
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Post by Paul Herber
Post by Chris
https://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/1436071/Cow-police-car-crash-Woodley-Berkshire-runaway-traffic-chaos?IYA-mail=44db4086-0765-47f0-ad12-74da0fae3572
Seen in our local rag, but we don’t live in this area.
Sincerely Chris
Where’s David when you need him????!!!
Steer him in the right direction.
Heifer so gently…
--
Toodle Pip (My other iPad is an old Pro)
Nick Odell
2021-05-14 19:56:06 UTC
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On Fri, 14 May 2021 15:30:19 GMT, Mike McMillan
Post by Chris
https://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/1436071/Cow-police-car-crash-Woodley-Berkshire-runaway-traffic-chaos?IYA-mail=44db4086-0765-47f0-ad12-74da0fae3572
Seen in our local rag, but we don’t live in this area.
Sincerely Chris
Where’s David when you need him????!!!
Where was the farmer with his machete?

I must have told umra before...

I was on the phone to my son - way back in the days when he was living
and working in Uganda. All of a sudden the call was interupted by the
loud cracking and breaking of wood and terminated in a very solid
thump followed by...

...total silence.

The sort of sound you might get if a cow were to fall off a very high
cliff, tearing into and snapping off tree branches on the way down
until it finally hit the rocks below. A dead cat might bounce but not
a dead cow. According to the running commentary from my son, it only
took a few moments for the farmer to run out to the cow with his
machete. If he had been any later he would have had to see the rest of
the villagers using their machetes to help themselves to free, fresh
beef. As it was, they all gathered moments after his arrival and he
sold the carcass piece by piece to his neighbours and made back some
of his bovine investment. Everybody ate well that night.

Nothing like that in Woodley, I suppose? What's for dinner tonight,
Mike?

Nick
(torre de panqueques over here)
Mike McMillan
2021-05-15 07:45:05 UTC
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Post by Nick Odell
On Fri, 14 May 2021 15:30:19 GMT, Mike McMillan
Post by Chris
https://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/1436071/Cow-police-car-crash-Woodley-Berkshire-runaway-traffic-chaos?IYA-mail=44db4086-0765-47f0-ad12-74da0fae3572
Seen in our local rag, but we don’t live in this area.
Sincerely Chris
Where’s David when you need him????!!!
Where was the farmer with his machete?
I must have told umra before...
I was on the phone to my son - way back in the days when he was living
and working in Uganda. All of a sudden the call was interupted by the
loud cracking and breaking of wood and terminated in a very solid
thump followed by...
...total silence.
The sort of sound you might get if a cow were to fall off a very high
cliff, tearing into and snapping off tree branches on the way down
until it finally hit the rocks below. A dead cat might bounce but not
a dead cow. According to the running commentary from my son, it only
took a few moments for the farmer to run out to the cow with his
machete. If he had been any later he would have had to see the rest of
the villagers using their machetes to help themselves to free, fresh
beef. As it was, they all gathered moments after his arrival and he
sold the carcass piece by piece to his neighbours and made back some
of his bovine investment. Everybody ate well that night.
Nothing like that in Woodley, I suppose? What's for dinner tonight,
Mike?
Nick
(torre de panqueques over here)
We ToodleNosh at ‘Lunchtime’ (i.e., 13:00 approx) and eat a light snack at
‘teatime’, (18:00 ish); lunch yesterday was thinly sliced lean beef with
red onion, mushrooms and green beans cooked gently in some gluten free
gravy with added flavouring - all accompanied by steamed Jersey Royal
potatoes and carrot.
--
Toodle Pip (My other iPad is an old Pro)
Chris J Dixon
2021-05-15 08:39:11 UTC
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Permalink
We ToodleNosh at ‘Lunchtime’ (i.e., 13:00 approx) and eat a light snack at
‘teatime’, (18:00 ish); lunch yesterday was thinly sliced lean beef with
red onion, mushrooms and green beans cooked gently in some gluten free
gravy with added flavouring - all accompanied by steamed Jersey Royal
potatoes and carrot.
Have we had the discussion on names for mealtimes? Alongside the
lunch/ dinner division, I have often wondered if those whose main
meal of the day is referred to as "supper" ever have a nibble
just before bedtime, and if so what they call it.

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk @ChrisJDixon1
Plant amazing Acers.
Jenny M Benson
2021-05-15 08:47:40 UTC
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Post by Chris J Dixon
Have we had the discussion on names for mealtimes? Alongside the
lunch/ dinner division, I have often wondered if those whose main
meal of the day is referred to as "supper" ever have a nibble
just before bedtime,
Yes, my family did when I was growing up ...

and if so what they call it.

but I have completely forgotten that. Sorry!
--
Jenny M Benson
Vicky Ayech
2021-05-15 08:49:25 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chris J Dixon
We ToodleNosh at ‘Lunchtime’ (i.e., 13:00 approx) and eat a light snack at
‘teatime’, (18:00 ish); lunch yesterday was thinly sliced lean beef with
red onion, mushrooms and green beans cooked gently in some gluten free
gravy with added flavouring - all accompanied by steamed Jersey Royal
potatoes and carrot.
Have we had the discussion on names for mealtimes? Alongside the
lunch/ dinner division, I have often wondered if those whose main
meal of the day is referred to as "supper" ever have a nibble
just before bedtime, and if so what they call it.
Chris
If it is just us here that main meal is supper but if I go out to eat
or with daughters it is dinner. Later foods are snacks.
steve hague
2021-05-15 09:00:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by Mike McMillan
We ToodleNosh at ‘Lunchtime’ (i.e., 13:00 approx) and eat a light snack at
‘teatime’, (18:00 ish); lunch yesterday was thinly sliced lean beef with
red onion, mushrooms and green beans cooked gently in some gluten free
gravy with added flavouring - all accompanied by steamed Jersey Royal
potatoes and carrot.
Have we had the discussion on names for mealtimes? Alongside the
lunch/ dinner division, I have often wondered if those whose main
meal of the day is referred to as "supper" ever have a nibble
just before bedtime, and if so what they call it.
Chris
I think we more or less agreed that any meal before 9.00 was breakfast.
Some thought a meal between 12.00 and 14.00 was lunch, others thought
dinner, I think age and geography were factors. Growing up in Sheffield,
it was dinner, having spent most of my life in Cornwall, its lunch. I
still refer to the evening meal as tea, and the light snack that
sometimes precedes bedtime is supper, when named at all.
Steve
BrritSki
2021-05-15 09:09:26 UTC
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Post by steve hague
Post by Chris J Dixon
Have we had the discussion on names for mealtimes? Alongside the
lunch/ dinner division, I have often wondered if those whose main
meal of the day is referred to as "supper" ever have a nibble
just before bedtime, and if so what they call it.
I think we more or less agreed that any meal before 9.00 was breakfast.
Some thought a meal between 12.00 and 14.00 was lunch, others thought
dinner, I think age and geography were factors. Growing up in Sheffield,
it was dinner, having spent most of my life in Cornwall, its lunch. I
still refer to the evening meal as tea, and the light snack that
sometimes precedes bedtime is supper, when named at all.
When I was growing up in Coventry - Barrow - Coventry it was breakfast
dinner tea and supper. Then in the RAF Officers mess it was breakfast
lunch and dinner, with no dinner at weekends but high tea instead.
In Italy it was (primo) colazione pranzo and cena.
Now it is breakfast lunch dinner.
Penny
2021-05-15 11:35:56 UTC
Reply
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On Sat, 15 May 2021 10:09:26 +0100, BrritSki <***@gmail.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by BrritSki
Post by steve hague
Post by Chris J Dixon
Have we had the discussion on names for mealtimes? Alongside the
lunch/ dinner division, I have often wondered if those whose main
meal of the day is referred to as "supper" ever have a nibble
just before bedtime, and if so what they call it.
I think we more or less agreed that any meal before 9.00 was breakfast.
Some thought a meal between 12.00 and 14.00 was lunch, others thought
dinner, I think age and geography were factors. Growing up in Sheffield,
it was dinner, having spent most of my life in Cornwall, its lunch. I
still refer to the evening meal as tea, and the light snack that
sometimes precedes bedtime is supper, when named at all.
When I was growing up in Coventry - Barrow - Coventry it was breakfast
dinner tea and supper. Then in the RAF Officers mess it was breakfast
lunch and dinner, with no dinner at weekends but high tea instead.
In Italy it was (primo) colazione pranzo and cena.
Now it is breakfast lunch dinner.
I'd forgotten about childhood tea (sandwiches and biscuits or cake) and
high tea (similar but boiled eggs or beans on toast followed by
cake/biscuits) on Sunday when we'd had a substantial roast dinner at lunch
time.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Jenny M Benson
2021-05-15 10:08:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by steve hague
I think we more or less agreed that any meal before 9.00 was breakfast.
Some thought a meal between 12.00 and 14.00 was lunch, others thought
dinner, I think age and geography were factors. Growing up in Sheffield,
it was dinner, having spent most of my life in Cornwall, its lunch. I
still refer to the evening meal as tea, and the light snack that
sometimes precedes bedtime is supper, when named at all.
For me, the difference between lunch & dinner or tea & dinner & supper
is not so much the time of day as the type of meal consumed.

If I have meat-&-2-veg type meal it is dinner, whether eaten midday or
early evening. If I have a beans-on-toast type meal it is lunch at
midday or supper in the early evening. For me, tea should comprise
sandwiches and cake at the very least, scones with jam & cream and/or
jelly better still. And it's eaten, not surprisingly, at tea time!
--
Jenny M Benson
Vicky Ayech
2021-05-15 10:34:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sat, 15 May 2021 11:08:31 +0100, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by steve hague
I think we more or less agreed that any meal before 9.00 was breakfast.
Some thought a meal between 12.00 and 14.00 was lunch, others thought
dinner, I think age and geography were factors. Growing up in Sheffield,
it was dinner, having spent most of my life in Cornwall, its lunch. I
still refer to the evening meal as tea, and the light snack that
sometimes precedes bedtime is supper, when named at all.
For me, the difference between lunch & dinner or tea & dinner & supper
is not so much the time of day as the type of meal consumed.
If I have meat-&-2-veg type meal it is dinner, whether eaten midday or
early evening. If I have a beans-on-toast type meal it is lunch at
midday or supper in the early evening. For me, tea should comprise
sandwiches and cake at the very least, scones with jam & cream and/or
jelly better still. And it's eaten, not surprisingly, at tea time!
What about high tea? That might have a bit more than sandwiches? Cold
meats? Salad? Trifle afterwards and cake.
Kate B
2021-05-15 11:15:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Sat, 15 May 2021 11:08:31 +0100, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by steve hague
I think we more or less agreed that any meal before 9.00 was breakfast.
Some thought a meal between 12.00 and 14.00 was lunch, others thought
dinner, I think age and geography were factors. Growing up in Sheffield,
it was dinner, having spent most of my life in Cornwall, its lunch. I
still refer to the evening meal as tea, and the light snack that
sometimes precedes bedtime is supper, when named at all.
For me, the difference between lunch & dinner or tea & dinner & supper
is not so much the time of day as the type of meal consumed.
If I have meat-&-2-veg type meal it is dinner, whether eaten midday or
early evening. If I have a beans-on-toast type meal it is lunch at
midday or supper in the early evening. For me, tea should comprise
sandwiches and cake at the very least, scones with jam & cream and/or
jelly better still. And it's eaten, not surprisingly, at tea time!
What about high tea? That might have a bit more than sandwiches? Cold
meats? Salad? Trifle afterwards and cake.
Breakfast is anything eaten before 11 (then it becomes elevenses); lunch
is anytime between 12 and 3; afternoon tea from 3 to 5.30. A substantial
evening meal would be high tea if taken before 7, but I'd always call it
dinner after that. Supper is a small affair - if lunch has been
substantial then one might have supper in the evening.

Basically, though, there is no inappropriate time for scoffing and what
you eat and what you call it is entirely up to you... though I have been
caught out by teas which were either much more or much less expansive
than I had frivolously assumed!
--
Kate B
London
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2021-05-16 00:13:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sat, 15 May 2021 at 12:15:20, Kate B <***@nospam.demon.co.uk>
wrote (my responses usually follow points raised):
[]
Post by Kate B
Breakfast is anything eaten before 11 (then it becomes elevenses);
lunch is anytime between 12 and 3; afternoon tea from 3 to 5.30. A
substantial evening meal would be high tea if taken before 7, but I'd
always call it dinner after that. Supper is a small affair - if lunch
has been substantial then one might have supper in the evening.
Basically, though, there is no inappropriate time for scoffing and what
you eat and what you call it is entirely up to you... though I have
been caught out by teas which were either much more or much less
expansive than I had frivolously assumed!
In some people's mind, though, there's an inappropriate time for _not_
scoffing, though: breakfast time. In other words, they think not having
breakfast is analogous to smoking ten a day, or something like that.
"Most important meal of the day", they say. Odd - it's always people
who've already decided for themselves to have breakfast; strange, that
(-:.

Meals: I can't remember before boarding school, but there, I think we
had three cooked meals a day: breakfast, dinner (at or soon after noon),
and tea (about six), plus an optional snack at bedtime, called supper.
Later/with parents, single main meal tended to be later in the evening -
say about 7, though I think not starved during the day. I got the
impression a later main meal was more a continental thing.

We just called our not-small early evening meal "tea", though I sort of
learnt that some people called a large meal then "high tea" (mostly
people who didn't normally _have_ a big meal then). A mid-afternoon
social activity, as opposed to for nutrition, was "afternoon tea" - tea
and buns/cakes.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

There's never enough time to do all the nothing you want.
CALVIN AND HOBBES, according to a @qikipedia tweet 2019-9-9.
Vicky Ayech
2021-05-16 08:29:50 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sun, 16 May 2021 01:13:27 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Kate B
Breakfast is anything eaten before 11 (then it becomes elevenses);
lunch is anytime between 12 and 3; afternoon tea from 3 to 5.30. A
substantial evening meal would be high tea if taken before 7, but I'd
always call it dinner after that. Supper is a small affair - if lunch
has been substantial then one might have supper in the evening.
Basically, though, there is no inappropriate time for scoffing and what
you eat and what you call it is entirely up to you... though I have
been caught out by teas which were either much more or much less
expansive than I had frivolously assumed!
In some people's mind, though, there's an inappropriate time for _not_
scoffing, though: breakfast time. In other words, they think not having
breakfast is analogous to smoking ten a day, or something like that.
"Most important meal of the day", they say. Odd - it's always people
who've already decided for themselves to have breakfast; strange, that
(-:.
Meals: I can't remember before boarding school, but there, I think we
had three cooked meals a day: breakfast, dinner (at or soon after noon),
and tea (about six), plus an optional snack at bedtime, called supper.
Later/with parents, single main meal tended to be later in the evening -
say about 7, though I think not starved during the day. I got the
impression a later main meal was more a continental thing.
We just called our not-small early evening meal "tea", though I sort of
learnt that some people called a large meal then "high tea" (mostly
people who didn't normally _have_ a big meal then). A mid-afternoon
social activity, as opposed to for nutrition, was "afternoon tea" - tea
and buns/cakes.
Halifax Hall at Sheffiled university had wonderful breakfasts. they
were self-service and you could get cereal, cooked breakfast after
that and toast and marmalade and tea or milk. If we didn't have an
early lecture gf and I would sit over more tea and toast and chat.

No lunch provided on weekdays. I think there was a formal dinner
around 7pm, gowns worn, except Wednesdays and weekends. Those evenings
food was put in the pantry to take and heat, beans, bread to
toast...there must have been some system to make sure we all got a
good share but I can't recall it. Don't recall sandwiches. Sunday
lunch was like dinners, the full roast. I think we had soup, main and
pud for dinners.

The students' union had two restaurants for hot food and one for
sandwiches, snacks and coffee. I think we tended to go there if no
dinner that night in hall.
Mike McMillan
2021-05-15 14:56:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Sat, 15 May 2021 11:08:31 +0100, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by steve hague
I think we more or less agreed that any meal before 9.00 was breakfast.
Some thought a meal between 12.00 and 14.00 was lunch, others thought
dinner, I think age and geography were factors. Growing up in Sheffield,
it was dinner, having spent most of my life in Cornwall, its lunch. I
still refer to the evening meal as tea, and the light snack that
sometimes precedes bedtime is supper, when named at all.
For me, the difference between lunch & dinner or tea & dinner & supper
is not so much the time of day as the type of meal consumed.
If I have meat-&-2-veg type meal it is dinner, whether eaten midday or
early evening. If I have a beans-on-toast type meal it is lunch at
midday or supper in the early evening. For me, tea should comprise
sandwiches and cake at the very least, scones with jam & cream and/or
jelly better still. And it's eaten, not surprisingly, at tea time!
What about high tea? That might have a bit more than sandwiches? Cold
meats? Salad? Trifle afterwards and cake.
A trifle of what afterwards???
--
Toodle Pip (My other iPad is an old Pro)
steve hague
2021-05-15 15:06:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Sat, 15 May 2021 11:08:31 +0100, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by steve hague
I think we more or less agreed that any meal before 9.00 was breakfast.
Some thought a meal between 12.00 and 14.00 was lunch, others thought
dinner, I think age and geography were factors. Growing up in Sheffield,
it was dinner, having spent most of my life in Cornwall, its lunch. I
still refer to the evening meal as tea, and the light snack that
sometimes precedes bedtime is supper, when named at all.
For me, the difference between lunch & dinner or tea & dinner & supper
is not so much the time of day as the type of meal consumed.
If I have meat-&-2-veg type meal it is dinner, whether eaten midday or
early evening. If I have a beans-on-toast type meal it is lunch at
midday or supper in the early evening. For me, tea should comprise
sandwiches and cake at the very least, scones with jam & cream and/or
jelly better still. And it's eaten, not surprisingly, at tea time!
What about high tea? That might have a bit more than sandwiches? Cold
meats? Salad? Trifle afterwards and cake.
Even as a child I couldn't be doing with trifle, nasty stuff. I didn't
like jelly either, except in the concentrated cubes it used to come in
before it had been boiled. I've never had much of a sweet tooth,
although I do enjoy certain flavours of ice cream. I accidentally bought
salted caramel flavour a while ago. Can people actually eat that stuff?
Steve
Mike McMillan
2021-05-15 15:20:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by steve hague
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Sat, 15 May 2021 11:08:31 +0100, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by steve hague
I think we more or less agreed that any meal before 9.00 was breakfast.
Some thought a meal between 12.00 and 14.00 was lunch, others thought
dinner, I think age and geography were factors. Growing up in Sheffield,
it was dinner, having spent most of my life in Cornwall, its lunch. I
still refer to the evening meal as tea, and the light snack that
sometimes precedes bedtime is supper, when named at all.
For me, the difference between lunch & dinner or tea & dinner & supper
is not so much the time of day as the type of meal consumed.
If I have meat-&-2-veg type meal it is dinner, whether eaten midday or
early evening. If I have a beans-on-toast type meal it is lunch at
midday or supper in the early evening. For me, tea should comprise
sandwiches and cake at the very least, scones with jam & cream and/or
jelly better still. And it's eaten, not surprisingly, at tea time!
What about high tea? That might have a bit more than sandwiches? Cold
meats? Salad? Trifle afterwards and cake.
Even as a child I couldn't be doing with trifle, nasty stuff. I didn't
like jelly either, except in the concentrated cubes it used to come in
before it had been boiled. I've never had much of a sweet tooth,
although I do enjoy certain flavours of ice cream. I accidentally bought
salted caramel flavour a while ago. Can people actually eat that stuff?
Steve
Last week’s Kitchen Cabinet had a short discussion on the subject of Trifle
Farts….
--
Toodle Pip (My other iPad is an old Pro)
Vicky Ayech
2021-05-15 17:43:50 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sat, 15 May 2021 16:06:54 +0100, steve hague
Post by steve hague
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Sat, 15 May 2021 11:08:31 +0100, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by steve hague
I think we more or less agreed that any meal before 9.00 was breakfast.
Some thought a meal between 12.00 and 14.00 was lunch, others thought
dinner, I think age and geography were factors. Growing up in Sheffield,
it was dinner, having spent most of my life in Cornwall, its lunch. I
still refer to the evening meal as tea, and the light snack that
sometimes precedes bedtime is supper, when named at all.
For me, the difference between lunch & dinner or tea & dinner & supper
is not so much the time of day as the type of meal consumed.
If I have meat-&-2-veg type meal it is dinner, whether eaten midday or
early evening. If I have a beans-on-toast type meal it is lunch at
midday or supper in the early evening. For me, tea should comprise
sandwiches and cake at the very least, scones with jam & cream and/or
jelly better still. And it's eaten, not surprisingly, at tea time!
What about high tea? That might have a bit more than sandwiches? Cold
meats? Salad? Trifle afterwards and cake.
Even as a child I couldn't be doing with trifle, nasty stuff. I didn't
like jelly either, except in the concentrated cubes it used to come in
before it had been boiled. I've never had much of a sweet tooth,
although I do enjoy certain flavours of ice cream. I accidentally bought
salted caramel flavour a while ago. Can people actually eat that stuff?
Steve
I love trifle. Also like salted caramet ice cream and chocolate.
Paul Herber
2021-05-15 19:41:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Sat, 15 May 2021 16:06:54 +0100, steve hague
Post by steve hague
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Sat, 15 May 2021 11:08:31 +0100, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by steve hague
I think we more or less agreed that any meal before 9.00 was breakfast.
Some thought a meal between 12.00 and 14.00 was lunch, others thought
dinner, I think age and geography were factors. Growing up in Sheffield,
it was dinner, having spent most of my life in Cornwall, its lunch. I
still refer to the evening meal as tea, and the light snack that
sometimes precedes bedtime is supper, when named at all.
For me, the difference between lunch & dinner or tea & dinner & supper
is not so much the time of day as the type of meal consumed.
If I have meat-&-2-veg type meal it is dinner, whether eaten midday or
early evening. If I have a beans-on-toast type meal it is lunch at
midday or supper in the early evening. For me, tea should comprise
sandwiches and cake at the very least, scones with jam & cream and/or
jelly better still. And it's eaten, not surprisingly, at tea time!
What about high tea? That might have a bit more than sandwiches? Cold
meats? Salad? Trifle afterwards and cake.
Even as a child I couldn't be doing with trifle, nasty stuff. I didn't
like jelly either, except in the concentrated cubes it used to come in
before it had been boiled. I've never had much of a sweet tooth,
although I do enjoy certain flavours of ice cream. I accidentally bought
salted caramel flavour a while ago. Can people actually eat that stuff?
Steve
I love trifle. Also like salted caramet ice cream and chocolate.
I hope somewhere in Mere, Somerset sells trifle.
--
Regards, Paul Herber
https://www.paulherber.co.uk/
Mike McMillan
2021-05-16 07:20:31 UTC
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Post by Paul Herber
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Sat, 15 May 2021 16:06:54 +0100, steve hague
Post by steve hague
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Sat, 15 May 2021 11:08:31 +0100, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by steve hague
I think we more or less agreed that any meal before 9.00 was breakfast.
Some thought a meal between 12.00 and 14.00 was lunch, others thought
dinner, I think age and geography were factors. Growing up in Sheffield,
it was dinner, having spent most of my life in Cornwall, its lunch. I
still refer to the evening meal as tea, and the light snack that
sometimes precedes bedtime is supper, when named at all.
For me, the difference between lunch & dinner or tea & dinner & supper
is not so much the time of day as the type of meal consumed.
If I have meat-&-2-veg type meal it is dinner, whether eaten midday or
early evening. If I have a beans-on-toast type meal it is lunch at
midday or supper in the early evening. For me, tea should comprise
sandwiches and cake at the very least, scones with jam & cream and/or
jelly better still. And it's eaten, not surprisingly, at tea time!
What about high tea? That might have a bit more than sandwiches? Cold
meats? Salad? Trifle afterwards and cake.
Even as a child I couldn't be doing with trifle, nasty stuff. I didn't
like jelly either, except in the concentrated cubes it used to come in
before it had been boiled. I've never had much of a sweet tooth,
although I do enjoy certain flavours of ice cream. I accidentally bought
salted caramel flavour a while ago. Can people actually eat that stuff?
Steve
I love trifle. Also like salted caramet ice cream and chocolate.
I hope somewhere in Mere, Somerset sells trifle.
Should be just a mere trifle to find one…
--
Toodle Pip (My other iPad is an old Pro)
Sam Plusnet
2021-05-16 18:42:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Paul Herber
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Sat, 15 May 2021 16:06:54 +0100, steve hague
Post by steve hague
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Sat, 15 May 2021 11:08:31 +0100, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by steve hague
I think we more or less agreed that any meal before 9.00 was breakfast.
Some thought a meal between 12.00 and 14.00 was lunch, others thought
dinner, I think age and geography were factors. Growing up in Sheffield,
it was dinner, having spent most of my life in Cornwall, its lunch. I
still refer to the evening meal as tea, and the light snack that
sometimes precedes bedtime is supper, when named at all.
For me, the difference between lunch & dinner or tea & dinner & supper
is not so much the time of day as the type of meal consumed.
If I have meat-&-2-veg type meal it is dinner, whether eaten midday or
early evening. If I have a beans-on-toast type meal it is lunch at
midday or supper in the early evening. For me, tea should comprise
sandwiches and cake at the very least, scones with jam & cream and/or
jelly better still. And it's eaten, not surprisingly, at tea time!
What about high tea? That might have a bit more than sandwiches? Cold
meats? Salad? Trifle afterwards and cake.
Even as a child I couldn't be doing with trifle, nasty stuff. I didn't
like jelly either, except in the concentrated cubes it used to come in
before it had been boiled. I've never had much of a sweet tooth,
although I do enjoy certain flavours of ice cream. I accidentally bought
salted caramel flavour a while ago. Can people actually eat that stuff?
Steve
I love trifle. Also like salted caramet ice cream and chocolate.
I hope somewhere in Mere, Somerset sells trifle.
And one of those table games you used to find in pubs.
--
Sam Plusnet
Penny
2021-05-16 22:37:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sun, 16 May 2021 19:42:37 +0100, Sam Plusnet <***@home.com> scrawled in
the dust...
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Paul Herber
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Sat, 15 May 2021 16:06:54 +0100, steve hague
Post by steve hague
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Sat, 15 May 2021 11:08:31 +0100, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by steve hague
I think we more or less agreed that any meal before 9.00 was breakfast.
Some thought a meal between 12.00 and 14.00 was lunch, others thought
dinner, I think age and geography were factors. Growing up in Sheffield,
it was dinner, having spent most of my life in Cornwall, its lunch. I
still refer to the evening meal as tea, and the light snack that
sometimes precedes bedtime is supper, when named at all.
For me, the difference between lunch & dinner or tea & dinner & supper
is not so much the time of day as the type of meal consumed.
If I have meat-&-2-veg type meal it is dinner, whether eaten midday or
early evening. If I have a beans-on-toast type meal it is lunch at
midday or supper in the early evening. For me, tea should comprise
sandwiches and cake at the very least, scones with jam & cream and/or
jelly better still. And it's eaten, not surprisingly, at tea time!
What about high tea? That might have a bit more than sandwiches? Cold
meats? Salad? Trifle afterwards and cake.
Even as a child I couldn't be doing with trifle, nasty stuff. I didn't
like jelly either, except in the concentrated cubes it used to come in
before it had been boiled. I've never had much of a sweet tooth,
although I do enjoy certain flavours of ice cream. I accidentally bought
salted caramel flavour a while ago. Can people actually eat that stuff?
Steve
I love trifle. Also like salted caramet ice cream and chocolate.
I hope somewhere in Mere, Somerset sells trifle.
And one of those table games you used to find in pubs.
Bagatelle? Never seen it in a pub.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Sam Plusnet
2021-05-17 20:30:03 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
the dust...
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Paul Herber
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Sat, 15 May 2021 16:06:54 +0100, steve hague
Post by steve hague
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Sat, 15 May 2021 11:08:31 +0100, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by steve hague
I think we more or less agreed that any meal before 9.00 was breakfast.
Some thought a meal between 12.00 and 14.00 was lunch, others thought
dinner, I think age and geography were factors. Growing up in Sheffield,
it was dinner, having spent most of my life in Cornwall, its lunch. I
still refer to the evening meal as tea, and the light snack that
sometimes precedes bedtime is supper, when named at all.
For me, the difference between lunch & dinner or tea & dinner & supper
is not so much the time of day as the type of meal consumed.
If I have meat-&-2-veg type meal it is dinner, whether eaten midday or
early evening. If I have a beans-on-toast type meal it is lunch at
midday or supper in the early evening. For me, tea should comprise
sandwiches and cake at the very least, scones with jam & cream and/or
jelly better still. And it's eaten, not surprisingly, at tea time!
What about high tea? That might have a bit more than sandwiches? Cold
meats? Salad? Trifle afterwards and cake.
Even as a child I couldn't be doing with trifle, nasty stuff. I didn't
like jelly either, except in the concentrated cubes it used to come in
before it had been boiled. I've never had much of a sweet tooth,
although I do enjoy certain flavours of ice cream. I accidentally bought
salted caramel flavour a while ago. Can people actually eat that stuff?
Steve
I love trifle. Also like salted caramet ice cream and chocolate.
I hope somewhere in Mere, Somerset sells trifle.
And one of those table games you used to find in pubs.
Bagatelle? Never seen it in a pub.
Wikipedia says it, so it must be true.

WIWAL, ours was home made. I wonder what happened to it?
--
Sam Plusnet
Penny
2021-05-17 21:42:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Mon, 17 May 2021 21:30:03 +0100, Sam Plusnet <***@home.com> scrawled in
the dust...
I wrote the alternate bits...
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Penny
Post by Sam Plusnet
And one of those table games you used to find in pubs.
Bagatelle? Never seen it in a pub.
Wikipedia says it, so it must be true.
WIWAL, ours was home made. I wonder what happened to it?
Ours was strange and green and had a spring - not sure what happened to it.
Grandpa had a lovely wooden one (no spring, just a drum stick) which d#2
now owns.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Mike McMillan
2021-05-18 07:22:13 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
the dust...
I wrote the alternate bits...
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Penny
Post by Sam Plusnet
And one of those table games you used to find in pubs.
Bagatelle? Never seen it in a pub.
Wikipedia says it, so it must be true.
WIWAL, ours was home made. I wonder what happened to it?
Ours was strange and green and had a spring - not sure what happened to it.
Grandpa had a lovely wooden one (no spring, just a drum stick) which d#2
now owns.
My Dad made one in the early 1950’s and it had a spring mechanism to propel
the marbles. Lasted for many years as I remember and was used a great deal
- by making it with a hardboard base braced with wood strips and all the
‘v’s being made with hardboard pieces, in fact the cost was very low - a
mere baga… err…. what you nudged me like that for???
--
Toodle Pip (My other iPad is an old Pro)
Penny
2021-05-18 09:41:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Tue, 18 May 2021 07:22:13 GMT, Mike McMillan <***@ntlworld.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Penny
the dust...
I wrote the alternate bits...
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Penny
Post by Sam Plusnet
And one of those table games you used to find in pubs.
Bagatelle? Never seen it in a pub.
Wikipedia says it, so it must be true.
WIWAL, ours was home made. I wonder what happened to it?
Ours was strange and green and had a spring - not sure what happened to it.
Grandpa had a lovely wooden one (no spring, just a drum stick) which d#2
now owns.
My Dad made one in the early 1950’s and it had a spring mechanism to propel
the marbles. Lasted for many years as I remember and was used a great deal
- by making it with a hardboard base braced with wood strips and all the
‘v’s being made with hardboard pieces,
What? No pins? I've never seen one without pins. Although pinball machines
don't have them.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
steve hague
2021-05-18 10:40:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Penny
the dust...
I wrote the alternate bits...
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Penny
Post by Sam Plusnet
And one of those table games you used to find in pubs.
Bagatelle? Never seen it in a pub.
Wikipedia says it, so it must be true.
WIWAL, ours was home made. I wonder what happened to it?
Ours was strange and green and had a spring - not sure what happened to it.
Grandpa had a lovely wooden one (no spring, just a drum stick) which d#2
now owns.
My Dad made one in the early 1950’s and it had a spring mechanism to propel
the marbles. Lasted for many years as I remember and was used a great deal
- by making it with a hardboard base braced with wood strips and all the
‘v’s being made with hardboard pieces,
What? No pins? I've never seen one without pins. Although pinball machines
don't have them.
There has to be a twist.
Steve
Mike McMillan
2021-05-18 11:18:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by steve hague
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Penny
the dust...
I wrote the alternate bits...
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Penny
Post by Sam Plusnet
And one of those table games you used to find in pubs.
Bagatelle? Never seen it in a pub.
Wikipedia says it, so it must be true.
WIWAL, ours was home made. I wonder what happened to it?
Ours was strange and green and had a spring - not sure what happened to it.
Grandpa had a lovely wooden one (no spring, just a drum stick) which d#2
now owns.
My Dad made one in the early 1950’s and it had a spring mechanism to propel
the marbles. Lasted for many years as I remember and was used a great deal
- by making it with a hardboard base braced with wood strips and all the
‘v’s being made with hardboard pieces,
What? No pins? I've never seen one without pins. Although pinball machines
don't have them.
There has to be a twist.
Steve
Should have seen that coming I suppose.
--
Toodle Pip (My other iPad is an old Pro)
Mike McMillan
2021-05-18 11:17:50 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Penny
the dust...
I wrote the alternate bits...
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Penny
Post by Sam Plusnet
And one of those table games you used to find in pubs.
Bagatelle? Never seen it in a pub.
Wikipedia says it, so it must be true.
WIWAL, ours was home made. I wonder what happened to it?
Ours was strange and green and had a spring - not sure what happened to it.
Grandpa had a lovely wooden one (no spring, just a drum stick) which d#2
now owns.
My Dad made one in the early 1950’s and it had a spring mechanism to propel
the marbles. Lasted for many years as I remember and was used a great deal
- by making it with a hardboard base braced with wood strips and all the
‘v’s being made with hardboard pieces,
What? No pins? I've never seen one without pins. Although pinball machines
don't have them.
Oh yus, you’re right of course! Think they were probably hardboard pins but
about 70 years have fuzzed my memory a little on the finer points…
--
Toodle Pip (My other iPad is an old Pro)
Vicky Ayech
2021-05-18 12:24:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Penny
the dust...
I wrote the alternate bits...
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Penny
Post by Sam Plusnet
And one of those table games you used to find in pubs.
Bagatelle? Never seen it in a pub.
Wikipedia says it, so it must be true.
WIWAL, ours was home made. I wonder what happened to it?
Ours was strange and green and had a spring - not sure what happened to it.
Grandpa had a lovely wooden one (no spring, just a drum stick) which d#2
now owns.
My Dad made one in the early 1950’s and it had a spring mechanism to propel
the marbles. Lasted for many years as I remember and was used a great deal
- by making it with a hardboard base braced with wood strips and all the
‘v’s being made with hardboard pieces,
What? No pins? I've never seen one without pins. Although pinball machines
don't have them.
My aunt's one had a spring to propel the ball. How else could it
work? I think it had nails too for the ball to go round.
Penny
2021-05-18 14:10:03 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Tue, 18 May 2021 13:24:42 +0100, Vicky Ayech <***@gmail.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Penny
the dust...
I wrote the alternate bits...
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Penny
Post by Sam Plusnet
And one of those table games you used to find in pubs.
Bagatelle? Never seen it in a pub.
Wikipedia says it, so it must be true.
WIWAL, ours was home made. I wonder what happened to it?
Ours was strange and green and had a spring - not sure what happened to it.
Grandpa had a lovely wooden one (no spring, just a drum stick) which d#2
now owns.
My Dad made one in the early 1950’s and it had a spring mechanism to propel
the marbles. Lasted for many years as I remember and was used a great deal
- by making it with a hardboard base braced with wood strips and all the
‘v’s being made with hardboard pieces,
What? No pins? I've never seen one without pins. Although pinball machines
don't have them.
My aunt's one had a spring to propel the ball. How else could it
work? I think it had nails too for the ball to go round.
With a drum stick, as stated - we had a drum stick for the green one with
the spring too - allowing for subtler shots. Our green one was covered in
olive green canvas I think but, this was varnished (or oiled) and was
well-glued down.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Sam Plusnet
2021-05-18 20:33:25 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Penny
the dust...
I wrote the alternate bits...
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Penny
Post by Sam Plusnet
And one of those table games you used to find in pubs.
Bagatelle? Never seen it in a pub.
Wikipedia says it, so it must be true.
WIWAL, ours was home made. I wonder what happened to it?
Ours was strange and green and had a spring - not sure what happened to it.
Grandpa had a lovely wooden one (no spring, just a drum stick) which d#2
now owns.
My Dad made one in the early 1950’s and it had a spring mechanism to propel
the marbles. Lasted for many years as I remember and was used a great deal
- by making it with a hardboard base braced with wood strips and all the
‘v’s being made with hardboard pieces,
What? No pins? I've never seen one without pins. Although pinball machines
don't have them.
Ours was a work of art, wrought with hundreds of pins. I can't recall
what the backing board was made of, but I'm pretty sure it wasn't hardboard.
--
Sam Plusnet
Mike McMillan
2021-05-19 05:38:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Penny
the dust...
I wrote the alternate bits...
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Penny
Post by Sam Plusnet
And one of those table games you used to find in pubs.
Bagatelle? Never seen it in a pub.
Wikipedia says it, so it must be true.
WIWAL, ours was home made. I wonder what happened to it?
Ours was strange and green and had a spring - not sure what happened to it.
Grandpa had a lovely wooden one (no spring, just a drum stick) which d#2
now owns.
My Dad made one in the early 1950’s and it had a spring mechanism to propel
the marbles. Lasted for many years as I remember and was used a great deal
- by making it with a hardboard base braced with wood strips and all the
‘v’s being made with hardboard pieces,
What? No pins? I've never seen one without pins. Although pinball machines
don't have them.
Ours was a work of art, wrought with hundreds of pins. I can't recall
what the backing board was made of, but I'm pretty sure it wasn't hardboard.
Oi loike the backin’ mate!
--
Toodle Pip (My other iPad is an old Pro)
Vicky Ayech
2021-05-19 09:04:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 19 May 2021 05:38:39 GMT, Mike McMillan
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Penny
the dust...
I wrote the alternate bits...
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Penny
Post by Sam Plusnet
And one of those table games you used to find in pubs.
Bagatelle? Never seen it in a pub.
Wikipedia says it, so it must be true.
WIWAL, ours was home made. I wonder what happened to it?
Ours was strange and green and had a spring - not sure what happened to it.
Grandpa had a lovely wooden one (no spring, just a drum stick) which d#2
now owns.
My Dad made one in the early 1950’s and it had a spring mechanism to propel
the marbles. Lasted for many years as I remember and was used a great deal
- by making it with a hardboard base braced with wood strips and all the
‘v’s being made with hardboard pieces,
What? No pins? I've never seen one without pins. Although pinball machines
don't have them.
Ours was a work of art, wrought with hundreds of pins. I can't recall
what the backing board was made of, but I'm pretty sure it wasn't hardboard.
Oi loike the backin’ mate!
Give it five.
Vicky Ayech
2021-05-18 12:22:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
the dust...
I wrote the alternate bits...
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Penny
Post by Sam Plusnet
And one of those table games you used to find in pubs.
Bagatelle? Never seen it in a pub.
Wikipedia says it, so it must be true.
WIWAL, ours was home made. I wonder what happened to it?
Ours was strange and green and had a spring - not sure what happened to it.
Grandpa had a lovely wooden one (no spring, just a drum stick) which d#2
now owns.
My aunt had a large wooden bagatelle, painted blue. I used to play
with it when I was there.
Sid Nuncius
2021-05-19 18:30:29 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Paul Herber
I hope somewhere in Mere, Somerset sells trifle.
And one of those table games you used to find in pubs.
Bagatelle? Never seen it in a pub.
And on the Mere, the wailing died away.

Yes, all right. I know it's got nothing to do with anything. I just
like the line (and the poem), OK? You want to make something of it?

(Sorry to be so late with this response, btw. Events, dear boy, events.)
--
Sid
(Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
John Ashby
2021-05-19 18:44:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Penny
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Paul Herber
I hope somewhere in Mere, Somerset sells trifle.
And one of those table games you used to find in pubs.
Bagatelle? Never seen it in a pub.
And on the Mere, the wailing died away.
Yes, all right.  I know it's got nothing to do with anything.  I just
like the line (and the poem), OK?  You want to make something of it?
(Sorry to be so late with this response, btw.  Events, dear boy, events.)
We've (well, I've) been wondering. Hope the events are either a) good
ones, b) behind you or c) copable with.

Have your upstairs neighbours at least gone back to work in this new
post-lockdown era?

john
Sid Nuncius
2021-05-19 19:00:16 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by John Ashby
Post by Sid Nuncius
(Sorry to be so late with this response, btw.  Events, dear boy, events.)
We've (well, I've) been wondering. Hope the events are either a) good
ones, b) behind you or c) copable with.
Thanks, John. Currently c). Just. A lot of letters with the word
"urgent" in them and consequently me schlepping to hospitals is (are?)
involved. More will be known after another MRI on Friday and
appointment with Consultant on Tuesday. Results from full-body bone
scan still awaited, and then we can all have a good laugh when we find
out what is really going on. (Highly unlikely to be consistent with a)
or b), I reckon.)
Post by John Ashby
Have your upstairs neighbours at least gone back to work in this new
post-lockdown era?
Some of the time. More importantly, the gyms are open and most of the
violent martial arts training is no longer immediately above our heads
for several hours a day.
--
Sid
(Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Vicky Ayech
2021-05-19 20:22:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 19 May 2021 20:00:16 +0100, Sid Nuncius
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by John Ashby
Post by Sid Nuncius
(Sorry to be so late with this response, btw.  Events, dear boy, events.)
We've (well, I've) been wondering. Hope the events are either a) good
ones, b) behind you or c) copable with.
Thanks, John. Currently c). Just. A lot of letters with the word
"urgent" in them and consequently me schlepping to hospitals is (are?)
involved. More will be known after another MRI on Friday and
appointment with Consultant on Tuesday. Results from full-body bone
scan still awaited, and then we can all have a good laugh when we find
out what is really going on. (Highly unlikely to be consistent with a)
or b), I reckon.)
Post by John Ashby
Have your upstairs neighbours at least gone back to work in this new
post-lockdown era?
Some of the time. More importantly, the gyms are open and most of the
violent martial arts training is no longer immediately above our heads
for several hours a day.
Good that upstairs is quieter and fingers crossed for the remaining
tests and results.
Min
2021-05-20 01:30:03 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Wed, 19 May 2021 20:00:16 +0100, Sid Nuncius
Post by John Ashby
(Sorry to be so late with this response, btw. Events, dear boy, events.)
We've (well, I've) been wondering. Hope the events are either a) good
ones, b) behind you or c) copable with.
Thanks, John. Currently c). Just. A lot of letters with the word
"urgent" in them and consequently me schlepping to hospitals is (are?)
involved. More will be known after another MRI on Friday and
appointment with Consultant on Tuesday. Results from full-body bone
scan still awaited, and then we can all have a good laugh when we find
out what is really going on. (Highly unlikely to be consistent with a)
or b), I reckon.)
Post by John Ashby
Have your upstairs neighbours at least gone back to work in this new
post-lockdown era?
Some of the time. More importantly, the gyms are open and most of the
violent martial arts training is no longer immediately above our heads
for several hours a day.
Good that upstairs is quieter and fingers crossed for the remaining
tests and results.
Yes, glad to hear the good news and hoping that it might be followed
by similar.
--
Min
Penny
2021-05-20 08:35:56 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 19 May 2021 18:30:03 -0700 (PDT), Min <***@googlemail.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Min
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Wed, 19 May 2021 20:00:16 +0100, Sid Nuncius
Post by John Ashby
(Sorry to be so late with this response, btw. Events, dear boy, events.)
We've (well, I've) been wondering. Hope the events are either a) good
ones, b) behind you or c) copable with.
Thanks, John. Currently c). Just. A lot of letters with the word
"urgent" in them and consequently me schlepping to hospitals is (are?)
involved. More will be known after another MRI on Friday and
appointment with Consultant on Tuesday. Results from full-body bone
scan still awaited, and then we can all have a good laugh when we find
out what is really going on. (Highly unlikely to be consistent with a)
or b), I reckon.)
Post by John Ashby
Have your upstairs neighbours at least gone back to work in this new
post-lockdown era?
Some of the time. More importantly, the gyms are open and most of the
violent martial arts training is no longer immediately above our heads
for several hours a day.
Good that upstairs is quieter and fingers crossed for the remaining
tests and results.
Yes, glad to hear the good news and hoping that it might be followed
by similar.
<languid wave>
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Mike McMillan
2021-05-20 06:59:44 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Wed, 19 May 2021 20:00:16 +0100, Sid Nuncius
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by John Ashby
Post by Sid Nuncius
(Sorry to be so late with this response, btw.  Events, dear boy, events.)
We've (well, I've) been wondering. Hope the events are either a) good
ones, b) behind you or c) copable with.
Thanks, John. Currently c). Just. A lot of letters with the word
"urgent" in them and consequently me schlepping to hospitals is (are?)
involved. More will be known after another MRI on Friday and
appointment with Consultant on Tuesday. Results from full-body bone
scan still awaited, and then we can all have a good laugh when we find
out what is really going on. (Highly unlikely to be consistent with a)
or b), I reckon.)
Post by John Ashby
Have your upstairs neighbours at least gone back to work in this new
post-lockdown era?
Some of the time. More importantly, the gyms are open and most of the
violent martial arts training is no longer immediately above our heads
for several hours a day.
Good that upstairs is quieter and fingers crossed for the remaining
tests and results.
Yes, indeed Sid.
--
Toodle Pip (My other iPad is an old Pro)
Serena Blanchflower
2021-05-20 08:09:02 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
Good that upstairs is quieter and fingers crossed for the remaining
tests and results.
<languid wave>
--
Best wishes, Serena
Never attribute to malice what can be adequately explained by stupidity.
Jenny M Benson
2021-05-20 09:16:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
Good that upstairs is quieter and fingers crossed for the remaining
tests and results.
Enthusiastic languid wave!
--
Jenny M Benson
Wrexham, UK
Nick Odell
2021-05-20 09:35:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 20 May 2021 10:16:07 +0100, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Vicky Ayech
Good that upstairs is quieter and fingers crossed for the remaining
tests and results.
Enthusiastic languid wave!
I'm a bit bind-moggled by that phrase but - what the heck - same here
from me too.

Nick
Sam Plusnet
2021-05-20 18:12:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
On Thu, 20 May 2021 10:16:07 +0100, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Vicky Ayech
Good that upstairs is quieter and fingers crossed for the remaining
tests and results.
Enthusiastic languid wave!
I'm a bit bind-moggled by that phrase but - what the heck - same here
from me too.
Followed by a vague languissante from here.
--
Sam Plusnet
Paul Herber
2021-05-20 19:38:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Nick Odell
On Thu, 20 May 2021 10:16:07 +0100, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Vicky Ayech
Good that upstairs is quieter and fingers crossed for the remaining
tests and results.
Enthusiastic languid wave!
I'm a bit bind-moggled by that phrase but - what the heck - same here
from me too.
Followed by a vague languissante from here.
I'm so sorry, but Monsieur may find the restaurant down the road more to his pocket and
taste!
--
Regards, Paul Herber
https://www.paulherber.co.uk/
Nick Odell
2021-05-20 20:35:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 20 May 2021 20:38:05 +0100, Paul Herber
Post by Paul Herber
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Nick Odell
On Thu, 20 May 2021 10:16:07 +0100, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Vicky Ayech
Good that upstairs is quieter and fingers crossed for the remaining
tests and results.
Enthusiastic languid wave!
I'm a bit bind-moggled by that phrase but - what the heck - same here
from me too.
Followed by a vague languissante from here.
I'm so sorry, but Monsieur may find the restaurant down the road more to his pocket and
taste!
They seem to have the builders in at the moment.

Nick
krw
2021-05-20 21:01:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
They seem to have the builders in at the moment.
That is not funny!

Earlier this evening I was checking the places we plan to eat next week
whilst perambulating the North. A particularly desired location was
Saltburn but on opening the website tonight I find it is closed until
early July for refurbishment. Lunch on Monday is no longer possible.

Who having been closed for months during lockdown decides to commence
refurbishment the moment the world is open again?

An alternative was sought and a potential target was identified - they
deliver to your booked deckchair. Except that the weather reports for
Monday imply howling gales and much water falling from the sky.

Eventually a third location was found and booked - no risks are being
taken even though they say they accept walk-ins!
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Tony Smith
2021-05-21 07:55:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thursday, 20 May 2021 at 21:35:18 UTC+1, Nick Odell wrote:

<snipped>
Post by Nick Odell
They seem to have the builders in at the moment.
I think my brother and I have eaten in that rather down-market caff. Toasted sandwich and mug of tea. There are better places to eat in the centre of Gloucester (1) but this one is very near the Court of Probate where we were going in connection with our parents' wills.

(1) The cathedral refectory, serving large portions, and the Fountain Inn off Westgate Street to name two.
Mike McMillan
2021-05-21 09:55:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Tony Smith
<snipped>
Post by Nick Odell
They seem to have the builders in at the moment.
I think my brother and I have eaten in that rather down-market caff.
Toasted sandwich and mug of tea. There are better places to eat in the
centre of Gloucester (1) but this one is very near the Court of Probate
where we were going in connection with our parents' wills.
(1) The cathedral refectory, serving large portions, and the Fountain Inn
off Westgate Street to name two.
I hear that they have a cellar of full-bodied wines…
--
Toodle Pip (My other iPad is an old Pro)
Nick Odell
2021-05-21 13:33:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Fri, 21 May 2021 00:55:37 -0700 (PDT), Tony Smith
Post by Tony Smith
<snipped>
Post by Nick Odell
They seem to have the builders in at the moment.
I think my brother and I have eaten in that rather down-market caff.
Toasted sandwich and mug of tea. There are better places to eat in
the centre of Gloucester (1) but this one is very near the Court of
Probate where we were going in connection with our parents' wills.
(1) The cathedral refectory, serving large portions, and the
Fountain Inn off Westgate Street to name two.
In a similar vein, in London we have eaten in the crypt at St
Martin-in-the-Fields. Very nice and at least we know where the money
goes. But we also like the Breadline cafe, just around the corner from
there in Duncannon Street. I guess it's of the same order as The Clean
Plate but my usual order is one of their range of omelettes and a mug
of tea.

The Breadline is right in the middle of the tourist centre of London
yet it doesn't seem to attract many outside visitors. It's a long time
since I lived in or around London so I suppose I'm a tourist now but
the clientele are a cross section of London life and I find the
Breadline is a little oasis of calm away from the hustle.

Nick
Mike McMillan
2021-05-21 14:26:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
On Fri, 21 May 2021 00:55:37 -0700 (PDT), Tony Smith
Post by Tony Smith
<snipped>
Post by Nick Odell
They seem to have the builders in at the moment.
I think my brother and I have eaten in that rather down-market caff.
Toasted sandwich and mug of tea. There are better places to eat in
the centre of Gloucester (1) but this one is very near the Court of
Probate where we were going in connection with our parents' wills.
(1) The cathedral refectory, serving large portions, and the
Fountain Inn off Westgate Street to name two.
In a similar vein, in London we have eaten in the crypt at St
Martin-in-the-Fields. Very nice and at least we know where the money
goes. But we also like the Breadline cafe, just around the corner from
there in Duncannon Street. I guess it's of the same order as The Clean
Plate but my usual order is one of their range of omelettes and a mug
of tea.
The Breadline is right in the middle of the tourist centre of London
yet it doesn't seem to attract many outside visitors. It's a long time
since I lived in or around London so I suppose I'm a tourist now but
the clientele are a cross section of London life and I find the
Breadline is a little oasis of calm away from the hustle.
Nick
When at St.John’s, Smith Square to record concerts, I have ventured into
the crypt noshery, but, even then, (15 years or more ago) one needed deep
pockets to afford meals on their menu:-(((
--
Toodle Pip (My other iPad is an old Pro)
Mike McMillan
2021-05-21 07:18:56 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Paul Herber
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Nick Odell
On Thu, 20 May 2021 10:16:07 +0100, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Vicky Ayech
Good that upstairs is quieter and fingers crossed for the remaining
tests and results.
Enthusiastic languid wave!
I'm a bit bind-moggled by that phrase but - what the heck - same here
from me too.
Followed by a vague languissante from here.
I'm so sorry, but Monsieur may find the restaurant down the road more to his pocket and
taste!
Err….do they do gluten free?
--
Toodle Pip (My other iPad is an old Pro)
Tony Smith
2021-05-21 08:04:29 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Friday, 21 May 2021 at 08:18:57 UTC+1, Mike McMillan wrote:

<snipped
Post by Mike McMillan
Err….do they do gluten free?
There is or was a café in a hole (Arch 35, Lower Approach Rd) by Bristol Temple Meads station called Hart's Bakery which had a slogan "Eat more Gluten" hanging up inside.
Sam Plusnet
2021-05-21 19:12:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Tony Smith
<snipped
Post by Mike McMillan
Err….do they do gluten free?
There is or was a café in a hole (Arch 35, Lower Approach Rd) by Bristol Temple Meads station called Hart's Bakery which had a slogan "Eat more Gluten" hanging up inside.
One of the deadly sins, gluteny.
--
Sam Plusnet
Sid Nuncius
2021-05-21 08:37:45 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Paul Herber
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Nick Odell
On Thu, 20 May 2021 10:16:07 +0100, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Vicky Ayech
Good that upstairs is quieter and fingers crossed for the remaining
tests and results.
Enthusiastic languid wave!
I'm a bit bind-moggled by that phrase but - what the heck - same here
from me too.
Followed by a vague languissante from here.
I'm so sorry, but Monsieur may find the restaurant down the road more to his pocket and
taste!
Err….do they do gluten free?
Free? No, luv - gluten's extra.

Thanks for all the good wishes, chums. That's the latest scan done
(just back), so we'll see...
--
Sid
(Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Hellerat
2021-05-22 06:01:02 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Nick Odell
On Thu, 20 May 2021 10:16:07 +0100, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Vicky Ayech
Good that upstairs is quieter and fingers crossed for the remaining
tests and results.
Enthusiastic languid wave!
I'm a bit bind-moggled by that phrase but - what the heck - same here
from me too.
Followed by a vague languissante from here.
Along with a belated wave from Cyprus, where they are so languid it will only reach you in
the middle of next month.
--
Yassas,
Anne, Exceptionally Traditionally-built Hellerat
Sam Plusnet
2021-05-22 20:31:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Hellerat
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Nick Odell
On Thu, 20 May 2021 10:16:07 +0100, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Vicky Ayech
Good that upstairs is quieter and fingers crossed for the remaining
tests and results.
Enthusiastic languid wave!
I'm a bit bind-moggled by that phrase but - what the heck - same here
from me too.
Followed by a vague languissante from here.
Along with a belated wave from Cyprus, where they are so languid it will
only reach you in the middle of next month.
Was that a αδύναμο κύμα ?

(with apologies for google translate)
--
Sam Plusnet
Hellerat
2021-05-23 06:02:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Hellerat
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Nick Odell
On Thu, 20 May 2021 10:16:07 +0100, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Vicky Ayech
Good that upstairs is quieter and fingers crossed for the remaining
tests and results.
Enthusiastic languid wave!
I'm a bit bind-moggled by that phrase but - what the heck - same here
from me too.
Followed by a vague languissante from here.
Along with a belated wave from Cyprus, where they are so languid it will only reach you
in the middle of next month.
Was that a αδύναμο κύμα ?
(with apologies for google translate)
I tried that on the Greek husbad, who just said "what you talkin' about, Willis?" (or
similar) and explained that κύμα is a wave from the sea and bears no relation to any hand
gesture.
--
Yassas,
Anne, Exceptionally Traditionally-built Hellerat
Sam Plusnet
2021-05-23 18:26:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Hellerat
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Hellerat
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Nick Odell
On Thu, 20 May 2021 10:16:07 +0100, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Vicky Ayech
Good that upstairs is quieter and fingers crossed for the remaining
tests and results.
Enthusiastic languid wave!
I'm a bit bind-moggled by that phrase but - what the heck - same here
from me too.
Followed by a vague languissante from here.
Along with a belated wave from Cyprus, where they are so languid it
will only reach you in the middle of next month.
Was that a αδύναμο κύμα ?
(with apologies for google translate)
I tried that on the Greek husbad, who just said "what you talkin' about,
Willis?" (or similar) and explained that κύμα is a wave from the sea and
bears no relation to any hand gesture.
A "Sailing By" kind of a wave.

"German Bight. Good."

P.S. I thought that piece of music had been around long before I came
on the scene, but Wiki says that Ronald Binge composed it in 1963.
Hence it's exactly the same age as the Dr Who theme music.
--
Sam Plusnet
Mike McMillan
2021-05-20 06:58:47 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by John Ashby
Post by Sid Nuncius
(Sorry to be so late with this response, btw.  Events, dear boy, events.)
We've (well, I've) been wondering. Hope the events are either a) good
ones, b) behind you or c) copable with.
Thanks, John. Currently c). Just. A lot of letters with the word
"urgent" in them and consequently me schlepping to hospitals is (are?)
involved. More will be known after another MRI on Friday and
appointment with Consultant on Tuesday. Results from full-body bone
scan still awaited, and then we can all have a good laugh when we find
out what is really going on. (Highly unlikely to be consistent with a)
or b), I reckon.)
Post by John Ashby
Have your upstairs neighbours at least gone back to work in this new
post-lockdown era?
Some of the time. More importantly, the gyms are open and most of the
violent martial arts training is no longer immediately above our heads
for several hours a day.
Well I hope they have a strong bed frame if the are indulging in hours of
marital arts every …. Oh ‘Martial’, as you were then…
--
Toodle Pip (My other iPad is an old Pro)
Sam Plusnet
2021-05-15 20:42:03 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by steve hague
Even as a child I couldn't be doing with trifle, nasty stuff. I didn't
like jelly either, except in the concentrated cubes it used to come in
before it had been boiled. I've never had much of a sweet tooth,
although I do enjoy certain flavours of ice cream. I accidentally bought
salted caramel flavour a while ago. Can people actually eat that stuff?
I was never keen on trifle, thus letting down the side since kids were
obviously supposed to love it.

I could never understand why it should come with a sprinkling of ball
bearings on top?
--
Sam Plusnet
Mike McMillan
2021-05-16 07:22:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by steve hague
Even as a child I couldn't be doing with trifle, nasty stuff. I didn't
like jelly either, except in the concentrated cubes it used to come in
before it had been boiled. I've never had much of a sweet tooth,
although I do enjoy certain flavours of ice cream. I accidentally bought
salted caramel flavour a while ago. Can people actually eat that stuff?
I was never keen on trifle, thus letting down the side since kids were
obviously supposed to love it.
I could never understand why it should come with a sprinkling of ball
bearings on top?
… or laced with alcohol…
--
Toodle Pip (My other iPad is an old Pro)
Vicky Ayech
2021-05-16 08:30:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sun, 16 May 2021 07:22:14 GMT, Mike McMillan
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by steve hague
Even as a child I couldn't be doing with trifle, nasty stuff. I didn't
like jelly either, except in the concentrated cubes it used to come in
before it had been boiled. I've never had much of a sweet tooth,
although I do enjoy certain flavours of ice cream. I accidentally bought
salted caramel flavour a while ago. Can people actually eat that stuff?
I was never keen on trifle, thus letting down the side since kids were
obviously supposed to love it.
I could never understand why it should come with a sprinkling of ball
bearings on top?
… or laced with alcohol…
I think the elcohol is essential but not silver balls. Hundreds and
thousands are usual.
Paul Herber
2021-05-16 09:35:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by steve hague
Even as a child I couldn't be doing with trifle, nasty stuff. I didn't
like jelly either, except in the concentrated cubes it used to come in
before it had been boiled. I've never had much of a sweet tooth,
although I do enjoy certain flavours of ice cream. I accidentally bought
salted caramel flavour a while ago. Can people actually eat that stuff?
I was never keen on trifle, thus letting down the side since kids were
obviously supposed to love it.
I could never understand why it should come with a sprinkling of ball
bearings on top?
It's a race to eat the whole thing.
--
Regards, Paul Herber
https://www.paulherber.co.uk/
Penny
2021-05-16 14:16:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sat, 15 May 2021 21:42:03 +0100, Sam Plusnet <***@home.com> scrawled in
the dust...
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by steve hague
Even as a child I couldn't be doing with trifle, nasty stuff. I didn't
like jelly either, except in the concentrated cubes it used to come in
before it had been boiled. I've never had much of a sweet tooth,
although I do enjoy certain flavours of ice cream. I accidentally bought
salted caramel flavour a while ago. Can people actually eat that stuff?
I was never keen on trifle, thus letting down the side since kids were
obviously supposed to love it.
The husgod and I both loved trifle but had very different ideas about what
the word meant - this led to Trifle Wars - I may have mentioned this
before.

I never saw a trifle made by my mother-in-law but I came to the conclusion
her son hadn't either, he had just received a portion of the trifle which,
once served in a bowl, looked a bit of a mess.

In my world, I had helped my mother decorate many trifles, so the
appearance of the whole dish was important to me. Nicely layered in a glass
dish (in our case, usually the deep top of the pyrex chicken roaster). A
layer of sponge (or boudoir fingers) soaked in sherry, topped with tinned
fruit and a layer of jelly. Then a layer of (Bird's) custard, topped with a
deep layer of stiffly whipped cream, smoothed out for decorating with
angelica and glacé cherries, as little flowers. It looked wonderful and
tasted great. Even tee total Scottish Grannie found it hard to resist and
always seemed surprised when she tasted the alcohol.

My own method was similar, though I used strawberries picked and frozen in
the summer, having realised this worked well when they were going to be
encased in jelly anyway.

The husgod made a bowl of pink blancmange, a bowl of chocolate blamange, a
bowl of vanilla blancmange and a bowl of red jelly. I can't remember if any
cake or booze was involved (I never ate any of his) but there was probably
a can of fruit in it too. Once set, he would put large spoonfuls of each
into a big dish to make a colourful mess and top it with spoonfuls of
whipped cream and colourful sprinkles.

His mother, sister, brother and the nieces and nephews all seemed to think
this was what a trifle looked like. Other guests seemed to recognise mine.
We always served both at the big Christmas party, there were seldom any
left-overs.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
krw
2021-05-16 14:23:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
Then a layer of (Bird's) custard
Is there any other kind? And keep the stabby knives to yourselves.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
BrritSki
2021-05-16 15:13:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
.... Nicely layered in a glass
dish (in our case, usually the deep top of the pyrex chicken roaster). A
layer of sponge (or boudoir fingers) soaked in sherry, topped with tinned
fruit and a layer of jelly. Then a layer of (Bird's) custard, topped with a
deep layer of stiffly whipped cream, smoothed out for decorating with
angelica and glacé cherries, as little flowers. It looked wonderful and
tasted great. Even tee total Scottish Grannie found it hard to resist and
always seemed surprised when she tasted the alcohol.
YAmyMum/GrandmaAICM5silverballs. Delicious.
Penny
2021-05-16 16:25:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sun, 16 May 2021 16:13:10 +0100, BrritSki <***@gmail.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by BrritSki
.... Nicely layered in a glass
dish (in our case, usually the deep top of the pyrex chicken roaster). A
layer of sponge (or boudoir fingers) soaked in sherry, topped with tinned
fruit and a layer of jelly. Then a layer of (Bird's) custard, topped with a
deep layer of stiffly whipped cream, smoothed out for decorating with
angelica and glacé cherries, as little flowers. It looked wonderful and
tasted great. Even tee total Scottish Grannie found it hard to resist and
always seemed surprised when she tasted the alcohol.
YAmyMum/GrandmaAICM5silverballs. Delicious.
Never silver balls!

Somewhere deep in the baking box I have a glass vial with a cork lid. It is
about half full with what it claims to be sugar balls coated in real
silver, it belonged to tee total Scottish Grannie. As they were still very
shiny, I'm not sure I believe it, though I'm not sure what else the coating
would be.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Sam Plusnet
2021-05-16 18:46:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by BrritSki
.... Nicely layered in a glass
dish (in our case, usually the deep top of the pyrex chicken roaster). A
layer of sponge (or boudoir fingers) soaked in sherry, topped with tinned
fruit and a layer of jelly. Then a layer of (Bird's) custard, topped with a
deep layer of stiffly whipped cream, smoothed out for decorating with
angelica and glacé cherries, as little flowers. It looked wonderful and
tasted great. Even tee total Scottish Grannie found it hard to resist and
always seemed surprised when she tasted the alcohol.
YAmyMum/GrandmaAICM5silverballs. Delicious.
Never silver balls!
Somewhere deep in the baking box I have a glass vial with a cork lid. It is
about half full with what it claims to be sugar balls coated in real
silver, it belonged to tee total Scottish Grannie. As they were still very
shiny, I'm not sure I believe it, though I'm not sure what else the coating
would be.
They are bound to cominhandy if you ever need to hand-reload shotgun
cartridges.
--
Sam Plusnet
Nick Odell
2021-05-16 23:32:13 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by BrritSki
.... Nicely layered in a glass
dish (in our case, usually the deep top of the pyrex chicken roaster). A
layer of sponge (or boudoir fingers) soaked in sherry, topped with tinned
fruit and a layer of jelly. Then a layer of (Bird's) custard, topped with a
deep layer of stiffly whipped cream, smoothed out for decorating with
angelica and glacé cherries, as little flowers. It looked wonderful and
tasted great. Even tee total Scottish Grannie found it hard to resist and
always seemed surprised when she tasted the alcohol.
YAmyMum/GrandmaAICM5silverballs. Delicious.
Never silver balls!
Somewhere deep in the baking box I have a glass vial with a cork lid. It is
about half full with what it claims to be sugar balls coated in real
silver, it belonged to tee total Scottish Grannie. As they were still very
shiny, I'm not sure I believe it, though I'm not sure what else the coating
would be.
Erme - according to Sainsbury -
<https://www.sainsburys.co.uk/gol-ui/product/birthday-and-party-cakes/sainsburys-silver-balls-78g>
it is silver.

But I notice it is out of stock, right now. Perhaps they have just
discovered that silver has been banned in the USA as a food ingredient
since 1906.

Nick
Vicky Ayech
2021-05-16 16:15:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
the dust...
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by steve hague
Even as a child I couldn't be doing with trifle, nasty stuff. I didn't
like jelly either, except in the concentrated cubes it used to come in
before it had been boiled. I've never had much of a sweet tooth,
although I do enjoy certain flavours of ice cream. I accidentally bought
salted caramel flavour a while ago. Can people actually eat that stuff?
I was never keen on trifle, thus letting down the side since kids were
obviously supposed to love it.
The husgod and I both loved trifle but had very different ideas about what
the word meant - this led to Trifle Wars - I may have mentioned this
before.
I never saw a trifle made by my mother-in-law but I came to the conclusion
her son hadn't either, he had just received a portion of the trifle which,
once served in a bowl, looked a bit of a mess.
In my world, I had helped my mother decorate many trifles, so the
appearance of the whole dish was important to me. Nicely layered in a glass
dish (in our case, usually the deep top of the pyrex chicken roaster). A
layer of sponge (or boudoir fingers) soaked in sherry, topped with tinned
fruit and a layer of jelly. Then a layer of (Bird's) custard, topped with a
deep layer of stiffly whipped cream, smoothed out for decorating with
angelica and glacé cherries, as little flowers. It looked wonderful and
tasted great. Even tee total Scottish Grannie found it hard to resist and
always seemed surprised when she tasted the alcohol.
My own method was similar, though I used strawberries picked and frozen in
the summer, having realised this worked well when they were going to be
encased in jelly anyway.
The husgod made a bowl of pink blancmange, a bowl of chocolate blamange, a
bowl of vanilla blancmange and a bowl of red jelly. I can't remember if any
cake or booze was involved (I never ate any of his) but there was probably
a can of fruit in it too. Once set, he would put large spoonfuls of each
into a big dish to make a colourful mess and top it with spoonfuls of
whipped cream and colourful sprinkles.
His mother, sister, brother and the nieces and nephews all seemed to think
this was what a trifle looked like. Other guests seemed to recognise mine.
We always served both at the big Christmas party, there were seldom any
left-overs.
Your version is the one I like.
Chris
2021-05-16 17:28:26 UTC
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Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by steve hague
Even as a child I couldn't be doing with trifle, nasty stuff. I didn't
like jelly either, except in the concentrated cubes it used to come in
before it had been boiled. I've never had much of a sweet tooth,
although I do enjoy certain flavours of ice cream. I accidentally bought
salted caramel flavour a while ago. Can people actually eat that stuff?
I was never keen on trifle, thus letting down the side since kids were
obviously supposed to love it.
I could never understand why it should come with a sprinkling of ball
bearings on top?
And chucking Sherry in it. With you on those silver balls too. Mike’s mum
*adored* trifle: it was part of our so calls treats whenever we visited.

Sincerely Chris
Mike McMillan
2021-05-15 14:56:05 UTC
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Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by steve hague
I think we more or less agreed that any meal before 9.00 was breakfast.
Some thought a meal between 12.00 and 14.00 was lunch, others thought
dinner, I think age and geography were factors. Growing up in Sheffield,
it was dinner, having spent most of my life in Cornwall, its lunch. I
still refer to the evening meal as tea, and the light snack that
sometimes precedes bedtime is supper, when named at all.
For me, the difference between lunch & dinner or tea & dinner & supper
is not so much the time of day as the type of meal consumed.
If I have meat-&-2-veg type meal it is dinner, whether eaten midday or
early evening. If I have a beans-on-toast type meal it is lunch at
midday or supper in the early evening. For me, tea should comprise
sandwiches and cake at the very least, scones with jam & cream and/or
jelly better still. And it's eaten, not surprisingly, at tea time!
Not forgetting the the dainty little finger should be free to waggle whilst
holding a teacup!
--
Toodle Pip (My other iPad is an old Pro)
Mike McMillan
2021-05-15 09:24:33 UTC
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Post by Chris J Dixon
We ToodleNosh at ‘Lunchtime’ (i.e., 13:00 approx) and eat a light snack at
‘teatime’, (18:00 ish); lunch yesterday was thinly sliced lean beef with
red onion, mushrooms and green beans cooked gently in some gluten free
gravy with added flavouring - all accompanied by steamed Jersey Royal
potatoes and carrot.
Have we had the discussion on names for mealtimes? Alongside the
lunch/ dinner division, I have often wondered if those whose main
meal of the day is referred to as "supper" ever have a nibble
just before bedtime, and if so what they call it.
Chris
A nibble at bedtime sounds good to me nudge-nudge, wink-wink;-)))
--
Toodle Pip (My other iPad is an old Pro)
Penny
2021-05-15 11:29:58 UTC
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On Sat, 15 May 2021 09:39:11 +0100, Chris J Dixon <***@cdixon.me.uk>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by Mike McMillan
We ToodleNosh at ‘Lunchtime’ (i.e., 13:00 approx) and eat a light snack at
‘teatime’, (18:00 ish); lunch yesterday was thinly sliced lean beef with
red onion, mushrooms and green beans cooked gently in some gluten free
gravy with added flavouring - all accompanied by steamed Jersey Royal
potatoes and carrot.
Have we had the discussion on names for mealtimes? Alongside the
lunch/ dinner division, I have often wondered if those whose main
meal of the day is referred to as "supper" ever have a nibble
just before bedtime, and if so what they call it.
My main evening meal, growing up, was supper*. We had nibbles (peanuts,
usually) before that with a glass of sherry/vermouth/whisky.

Then we had our usual Scottish holiday one year and the booked weeks had
been messed up (possibly by my father) so we spent the first week in the
croft house with the family which lived there. The seemed to eat 4 or 5
meals a day. One before breakfast - out for early tasks - breakfast, lunch,
tea (the main meal) and supper. It was most disorientating.

*I later learned to call this tea (or dinner) with other families.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Vicky Ayech
2021-05-15 17:42:08 UTC
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Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Chris J Dixon
We ToodleNosh at ‘Lunchtime’ (i.e., 13:00 approx) and eat a light snack at
‘teatime’, (18:00 ish); lunch yesterday was thinly sliced lean beef with
red onion, mushrooms and green beans cooked gently in some gluten free
gravy with added flavouring - all accompanied by steamed Jersey Royal
potatoes and carrot.
Have we had the discussion on names for mealtimes? Alongside the
lunch/ dinner division, I have often wondered if those whose main
meal of the day is referred to as "supper" ever have a nibble
just before bedtime, and if so what they call it.
My main evening meal, growing up, was supper*. We had nibbles (peanuts,
usually) before that with a glass of sherry/vermouth/whisky.
Then we had our usual Scottish holiday one year and the booked weeks had
been messed up (possibly by my father) so we spent the first week in the
croft house with the family which lived there. The seemed to eat 4 or 5
meals a day. One before breakfast - out for early tasks - breakfast, lunch,
tea (the main meal) and supper. It was most disorientating.
*I later learned to call this tea (or dinner) with other families.
When we stayed in a kosher hotel in Bournemouth when I was 16 and my
mum wanted me to meet suitable boys :) there were several meals too.
Tea and biscuits to the bedside first thing. Breakfast. Elevenses.
Lunch. Tea, dinner, later supper. I gathered this was normal Jewish
hotel catering.
steve hague
2021-05-15 18:52:22 UTC
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Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by Penny
Then we had our usual Scottish holiday one year and the booked weeks had
been messed up (possibly by my father) so we spent the first week in the
croft house with the family which lived there. The seemed to eat 4 or 5
meals a day. One before breakfast - out for early tasks - breakfast, lunch,
tea (the main meal) and supper. It was most disorientating.
*I later learned to call this tea (or dinner) with other families.
When we stayed in a kosher hotel in Bournemouth when I was 16 and my
mum wanted me to meet suitable boys :) there were several meals too.
Tea and biscuits to the bedside first thing. Breakfast. Elevenses.
Lunch. Tea, dinner, later supper. I gathered this was normal Jewish
hotel catering.
I don't suppose you could point me in the direction of a kosher hotel in
Cornwall, could you Vicky? I'm not Jewish, but the catering sounds good
to me.
Steve
John Ashby
2021-05-15 19:51:26 UTC
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Permalink
Post by steve hague
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by Penny
Then we had our usual Scottish holiday one year and the booked weeks had
been messed up (possibly by my father) so we spent the first week in the
croft house with the family which lived there. The seemed to eat 4 or 5
meals a day. One before breakfast - out for early tasks - breakfast, lunch,
tea (the main meal) and supper. It was most disorientating.
*I later learned to call this tea (or dinner) with other families.
When we stayed in a kosher hotel in Bournemouth when I was 16 and my
mum wanted me to meet suitable boys :)  there were several meals too.
Tea and biscuits to the bedside first thing.  Breakfast. Elevenses.
Lunch. Tea, dinner, later supper.    I gathered this was normal Jewish
hotel catering.
I don't suppose you could point me in the direction of a kosher hotel in
Cornwall, could you Vicky? I'm not Jewish, but the catering sounds good
to me.
Steve
You wouldn't like it, the food is terrible and such small portions (W.
Allen)

john
Serena Blanchflower
2021-05-15 14:07:00 UTC
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Post by Chris J Dixon
Have we had the discussion on names for mealtimes? Alongside the
lunch/ dinner division, I have often wondered if those whose main
meal of the day is referred to as "supper" ever have a nibble
just before bedtime, and if so what they call it.
As a supper eater, I've never had a bedtime nibble on a sufficiently
regular basis for it to have a proper name.

Thinking about it, I wonder if there's a correlation between people who
eat their main meal at lunchtime and those who need a small smackerel of
something at bedtime. Having had my main meal only a few hours earlier,
I rarely feel the need for anything before bed.
--
Best wishes, Serena
Q. Why do animals have fur coats?
A. Because they'd look silly in anoraks.
Joe Kerr
2021-05-15 20:29:53 UTC
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Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by Mike McMillan
We ToodleNosh at ‘Lunchtime’ (i.e., 13:00 approx) and eat a light snack at
‘teatime’, (18:00 ish); lunch yesterday was thinly sliced lean beef with
red onion, mushrooms and green beans cooked gently in some gluten free
gravy with added flavouring - all accompanied by steamed Jersey Royal
potatoes and carrot.
Have we had the discussion on names for mealtimes? Alongside the
lunch/ dinner division, I have often wondered if those whose main
meal of the day is referred to as "supper" ever have a nibble
just before bedtime, and if so what they call it.
Chris
Our main meal, in the evening, was "dinner". The snack before bedtime
(usually during or after the late night movie) was known as "raiding the
cheese box" or "how about a bacon sandwich but don't tell your mother".
--
Ric
Clive Arthur
2021-05-19 15:15:22 UTC
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Post by Chris
https://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/1436071/Cow-police-car-crash-Woodley-Berkshire-runaway-traffic-chaos?IYA-mail=44db4086-0765-47f0-ad12-74da0fae3572
Seen in our local rag, but we don’t live in this area.
Sincerely Chris
I trust you'll be attending on behalf of us all...

https://www.readingchronicle.co.uk/news/19313142.vigil-held-woodley-cow-killed-police-car/
--
Cheers
Clive
Mike McMillan
2021-05-19 16:24:15 UTC
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Post by Clive Arthur
Post by Chris
https://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/1436071/Cow-police-car-crash-Woodley-Berkshire-runaway-traffic-chaos?IYA-mail=44db4086-0765-47f0-ad12-74da0fae3572
Seen in our local rag, but we don’t live in this area.
Sincerely Chris
I trust you'll be attending on behalf of us all...
https://www.readingchronicle.co.uk/news/19313142.vigil-held-woodley-cow-killed-police-car/
Should I pack some beef sarnies to take along - plus a few gallons of OXO
drinks?
--
Toodle Pip (My other iPad is an old Pro)
Clive Arthur
2021-05-19 17:03:26 UTC
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Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Clive Arthur
Post by Chris
https://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/1436071/Cow-police-car-crash-Woodley-Berkshire-runaway-traffic-chaos?IYA-mail=44db4086-0765-47f0-ad12-74da0fae3572
Seen in our local rag, but we don’t live in this area.
Sincerely Chris
I trust you'll be attending on behalf of us all...
https://www.readingchronicle.co.uk/news/19313142.vigil-held-woodley-cow-killed-police-car/
Should I pack some beef sarnies to take along - plus a few gallons of OXO
drinks?
And some home-made beef tallow candles, four should do. But wrap up
warm, it could well be friesian.
--
Cheers
Clive
Mike McMillan
2021-05-19 17:34:50 UTC
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Post by Clive Arthur
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Clive Arthur
Post by Chris
https://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/1436071/Cow-police-car-crash-Woodley-Berkshire-runaway-traffic-chaos?IYA-mail=44db4086-0765-47f0-ad12-74da0fae3572
Seen in our local rag, but we don’t live in this area.
Sincerely Chris
I trust you'll be attending on behalf of us all...
https://www.readingchronicle.co.uk/news/19313142.vigil-held-woodley-cow-killed-police-car/
Should I pack some beef sarnies to take along - plus a few gallons of OXO
drinks?
And some home-made beef tallow candles, four should do. But wrap up
warm, it could well be friesian.
If it is going to be that cold, perhaps I should also take some corned beef
and onion pasties, some suet pudding and wrap myself up in some leather
gear and sit on my wooden stool held together with hoof and horn glue.
--
Toodle Pip (My other iPad is an old Pro)
Clive Arthur
2021-05-19 18:34:47 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On 19/05/2021 18:34, Mike McMillan wrote:

<snip>
Post by Mike McMillan
If it is going to be that cold, perhaps I should also take some corned beef
and onion pasties, some suet pudding and wrap myself up in some leather
gear and sit on my wooden stool held together with hoof and horn glue.
Well I knew you were getting on a bit, but is that really the best the
NHS can do? Horn glue in the age of Viagra? And I have to say that
wooden stools don't surprise me given the diet you describe.
--
Cheers
Clive
Chris
2021-05-20 11:05:01 UTC
Reply
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Post by Clive Arthur
Post by Chris
https://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/1436071/Cow-police-car-crash-Woodley-Berkshire-runaway-traffic-chaos?IYA-mail=44db4086-0765-47f0-ad12-74da0fae3572
Seen in our local rag, but we don’t live in this area.
Sincerely Chris
I trust you'll be attending on behalf of us all...
https://www.readingchronicle.co.uk/news/19313142.vigil-held-woodley-cow-killed-police-car/
Wouldn’t be allowed out that far. LOL.

The world’s gone mad!

Sincerely Chris
Clive Arthur
2021-05-21 11:08:37 UTC
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Post by Chris
Post by Clive Arthur
Post by Chris
https://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/1436071/Cow-police-car-crash-Woodley-Berkshire-runaway-traffic-chaos?IYA-mail=44db4086-0765-47f0-ad12-74da0fae3572
Seen in our local rag, but we don’t live in this area.
Sincerely Chris
I trust you'll be attending on behalf of us all...
https://www.readingchronicle.co.uk/news/19313142.vigil-held-woodley-cow-killed-police-car/
Wouldn’t be allowed out that far. LOL.
The world’s gone mad!
Sincerely Chris
https://www.readingchronicle.co.uk/news/19319682.vigil-woodley-cow-sees-mourners-pay-respects-lay-flowers/
--
Cheers
Clive
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