Discussion:
OT tech help for care givers
(too old to reply)
Vicky Ayech
2019-10-28 07:13:01 UTC
Permalink
https://www.caring.com/articles/caregiver-technology/
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2019-10-28 19:27:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
https://www.caring.com/articles/caregiver-technology/
An interesting piece. It doesn't mention privacy/intrusion concerns,
which is in some ways a refreshing change. (It also _slightly_ overdoes
the technology IMO - reminder app.s versus compartmentalised pillboxes,
some aspects of lighting and heating - but never mind. And doesn't
mention costs [which, arguably, extends its longevity/usefullness].)

Good, easy-to-read piece.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

My movies rise below vulgarity. - Mel Brooks, quoted by Barry Norman in RT
2016/11/26-12/2
Vicky Ayech
2019-10-29 09:55:05 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 28 Oct 2019 19:27:16 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Vicky Ayech
https://www.caring.com/articles/caregiver-technology/
An interesting piece. It doesn't mention privacy/intrusion concerns,
which is in some ways a refreshing change. (It also _slightly_ overdoes
the technology IMO - reminder app.s versus compartmentalised pillboxes,
some aspects of lighting and heating - but never mind. And doesn't
mention costs [which, arguably, extends its longevity/usefullness].)
Good, easy-to-read piece.
Those pillboxes are no good if you don't think of taking the pill
until it is time for the next, or until you feel ill and realise why,
because you forgot to take a pill. But Alexa, ah, Alexa. She can
remind you.
Penny
2019-10-29 12:30:34 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 29 Oct 2019 09:55:05 +0000, Vicky Ayech <***@gmail.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Vicky Ayech
Those pillboxes are no good if you don't think of taking the pill
until it is time for the next, or until you feel ill and realise why,
because you forgot to take a pill. But Alexa, ah, Alexa. She can
remind you.
When I took several pills a day, at intervals, I found having one day's
worth in a pillbox (what else?) in my pocket very useful. My brain was away
somewhere at the time but knew I had to take pills. A quick glance in the
box told me if I'd missed one. D#2 (aged about 13), who regularly 'sat'
with my friend's disabled son (aged about 40), taught me that one.

These days most of my meds are not pills and I can go all day wondering why
I feel so bad with no real way to check if I forgot my morning 'puff'.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Vicky Ayech
2019-10-29 14:01:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Vicky Ayech
Those pillboxes are no good if you don't think of taking the pill
until it is time for the next, or until you feel ill and realise why,
because you forgot to take a pill. But Alexa, ah, Alexa. She can
remind you.
When I took several pills a day, at intervals, I found having one day's
worth in a pillbox (what else?) in my pocket very useful. My brain was away
somewhere at the time but knew I had to take pills. A quick glance in the
box told me if I'd missed one. D#2 (aged about 13), who regularly 'sat'
with my friend's disabled son (aged about 40), taught me that one.
These days most of my meds are not pills and I can go all day wondering why
I feel so bad with no real way to check if I forgot my morning 'puff'.
Oh we both use the boxes but Alexa reminds B too. He forgets to look
at the box. I have things in places. Get up and glass of water is next
to pill box in bedroom. Take glass down and second pill after
breakfast is next to fridge. 3rd too for later. I often forget the
next though but it is an Ibuprofen and I remember if hurting more.

Sundays are worst as all different as Alendronate first. You take it
on getting up and nil by mouth then, even other pills, for half an
hour to an hour AND you have to remain upright or it damages your
gullet.That puts all the rest out of time. Oh the midday I have to
tick on a white board daily. Bedtime ones are usually remembered.
Chris J Dixon
2019-10-29 19:04:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
Sundays are worst as all different as Alendronate first. You take it
on getting up and nil by mouth then, even other pills, for half an
hour to an hour AND you have to remain upright or it damages your
gullet.That puts all the rest out of time.
That does sound like a complete pain. I guess you can't even get
on with showering and dressing, since that would involve some
bending?

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk @ChrisJDixon1
Plant amazing Acers.
Vicky Ayech
2019-10-29 21:46:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by Vicky Ayech
Sundays are worst as all different as Alendronate first. You take it
on getting up and nil by mouth then, even other pills, for half an
hour to an hour AND you have to remain upright or it damages your
gullet.That puts all the rest out of time.
That does sound like a complete pain. I guess you can't even get
on with showering and dressing, since that would involve some
bending?
Chris
Yes, and if you need teeth out the dentist has hysterics and you have
to go to the hospital in case you get necrosis! But it is better than
a broken hip, which elderly females tend to get. Actually both my
grandmother and her sister fell in their 90s and broke their hip and
that was the final illness. Just bed then until the end. Not sure if
they had osteoporois though. I have had it since about 2010
apparently. I broke an arm then in a fall and they test bone density
now regularly.
Chris J Dixon
2019-10-30 09:40:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
Yes, and if you need teeth out the dentist has hysterics and you have
to go to the hospital in case you get necrosis! But it is better than
a broken hip, which elderly females tend to get. Actually both my
grandmother and her sister fell in their 90s and broke their hip and
that was the final illness. Just bed then until the end. Not sure if
they had osteoporois though. I have had it since about 2010
apparently. I broke an arm then in a fall and they test bone density
now regularly.
I am awaiting test results at the moment.

The Biobank project, which started about 10 years ago to record
some basic health parameters of a significant cohort of people of
a certain age, has more recently started more sophisticated
scanning, and I was done earlier this year.

<https://imaging.ukbiobank.ac.uk/>

A couple of months later, the surgery rang to say that, following
the scans, I needed to speak to a doctor "within 7 days". You can
imagine the possible scenarios that were going through my head
until I could have that conversation.

They had notified my GP that I needed further investigation for
bone density. They also spotted a couple of healed fractures of
vertebral processes (the sticky-out bits).

I was relieved, but more than a little concerned that they gave
me the news in such a vague manner, leaving me worrying for
several days. Only later did I get a letter from Biobank which
would have been far less alarming had it arrived first.

I have had another DEXA scan and some blood tests, and been
warned to make sure my dental work is up to date. Several months
on I am still waiting for the next move.

The injury happened last Christmas. There is an area in
Loughborough that has been pedestrianised, road and pavement all
given the same block paving, and level apart from where the bus
stop had been, where the kerb remained. I didn't notice, stepped
off and toppled, landing with my back against the kerb.

I guess I wasn't the only casualty, as they have now installed a
row of shiny bollards.

I was in some pain when moving, for a few days, then just a
little uncomfortable, but thought it was just bruising -
apparently not, though the treatment, if diagnosed, would not
have been to do anything.

When I asked my GP for interim advice before going on holiday,
she said "no bungee jumping", so that's OK.

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk @ChrisJDixon1
Plant amazing Acers.
Mike
2019-10-30 09:54:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by Vicky Ayech
Yes, and if you need teeth out the dentist has hysterics and you have
to go to the hospital in case you get necrosis! But it is better than
a broken hip, which elderly females tend to get. Actually both my
grandmother and her sister fell in their 90s and broke their hip and
that was the final illness. Just bed then until the end. Not sure if
they had osteoporois though. I have had it since about 2010
apparently. I broke an arm then in a fall and they test bone density
now regularly.
I am awaiting test results at the moment.
The Biobank project, which started about 10 years ago to record
some basic health parameters of a significant cohort of people of
a certain age, has more recently started more sophisticated
scanning, and I was done earlier this year.
<https://imaging.ukbiobank.ac.uk/>
A couple of months later, the surgery rang to say that, following
the scans, I needed to speak to a doctor "within 7 days". You can
imagine the possible scenarios that were going through my head
until I could have that conversation.
They had notified my GP that I needed further investigation for
bone density. They also spotted a couple of healed fractures of
vertebral processes (the sticky-out bits).
I was relieved, but more than a little concerned that they gave
me the news in such a vague manner, leaving me worrying for
several days. Only later did I get a letter from Biobank which
would have been far less alarming had it arrived first.
I have had another DEXA scan and some blood tests, and been
warned to make sure my dental work is up to date. Several months
on I am still waiting for the next move.
The injury happened last Christmas. There is an area in
Loughborough that has been pedestrianised, road and pavement all
given the same block paving, and level apart from where the bus
stop had been, where the kerb remained. I didn't notice, stepped
off and toppled, landing with my back against the kerb.
I guess I wasn't the only casualty, as they have now installed a
row of shiny bollards.
I was in some pain when moving, for a few days, then just a
little uncomfortable, but thought it was just bruising -
apparently not, though the treatment, if diagnosed, would not
have been to do anything.
When I asked my GP for interim advice before going on holiday,
she said "no bungee jumping", so that's OK.
Chris
We hope it is all settled soon Chris, I am pleased to say, neither my
doctor (n)or I have received any worrisome massages post my UKBiobank scans
last spring. We have both been UKBiobankers almost since the startup -
summat like 15 years now!
--
Toodle Pip
Chris McMillan
2019-10-30 10:08:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by Vicky Ayech
Yes, and if you need teeth out the dentist has hysterics and you have
to go to the hospital in case you get necrosis! But it is better than
a broken hip, which elderly females tend to get. Actually both my
grandmother and her sister fell in their 90s and broke their hip and
that was the final illness. Just bed then until the end. Not sure if
they had osteoporois though. I have had it since about 2010
apparently. I broke an arm then in a fall and they test bone density
now regularly.
I am awaiting test results at the moment.
The Biobank project, which started about 10 years ago to record
some basic health parameters of a significant cohort of people of
a certain age, has more recently started more sophisticated
scanning, and I was done earlier this year.
<https://imaging.ukbiobank.ac.uk/>
We’re very surprised that almost all medics we mention Biobank to either
don’t know about it or know because patients have mentioned it.

Glad to hear you’re reaping the rewards of Biobank.

Sincerely Chris
Jenny M Benson
2019-10-29 16:38:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Vicky Ayech
Those pillboxes are no good if you don't think of taking the pill
until it is time for the next, or until you feel ill and realise why,
because you forgot to take a pill. But Alexa, ah, Alexa. She can
remind you.
When I took several pills a day, at intervals, I found having one day's
worth in a pillbox (what else?) in my pocket very useful. My brain was away
somewhere at the time but knew I had to take pills. A quick glance in the
box told me if I'd missed one. D#2 (aged about 13), who regularly 'sat'
with my friend's disabled son (aged about 40), taught me that one.
Even Alexa is not much use to you if you nugger off for the weekend at
very short notice and forget to take any of your medication with you.

That's even more unfortunate when you have to face the Practice Nurse
first thing on your return and she informs you that your blood pressure
is "at stroke level." (But the fact that I am at my desk the next day
and still able to Umraticise suggests that I got away with it this time.
(Phew!)
--
Jenny M Benson
http://jennygenes.blogspot.co.uk/
BrritSki
2019-10-29 16:48:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jenny M Benson
Even Alexa is not much use to you if you nugger off for the weekend at
very short notice and forget to take any of your medication with you.
That's even more unfortunate when you have to face the Practice Nurse
first thing on your return and she informs you that your blood pressure
is "at stroke level."
Did she give you a stroke ? EMNTK

(But the fact that I am at my desk the next day
Post by Jenny M Benson
and still able to Umraticise suggests that I got away with it this time.
 (Phew!)
Phew indeed :)
Sam Plusnet
2019-10-29 21:03:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Vicky Ayech
Those pillboxes are no good if you don't think of taking the pill
until it is time for the next, or until you feel ill and realise why,
because you forgot to take a pill. But Alexa, ah, Alexa. She can
remind you.
When I took several pills a day, at intervals, I found having one day's
worth in a pillbox (what else?) in my pocket very useful. My brain was away
somewhere at the time but knew I had to take pills. A quick glance in the
box told me if I'd missed one. D#2 (aged about 13), who regularly 'sat'
with my friend's  disabled son (aged about 40), taught me that one.
Even Alexa is not much use to you if you nugger off for the weekend at
very short notice and forget to take any of your medication with you.
That's even more unfortunate when you have to face the Practice Nurse
first thing on your return and she informs you that your blood pressure
is "at stroke level."  (But the fact that I am at my desk the next day
and still able to Umraticise suggests that I got away with it this time.
 (Phew!)
Wofe is not gaga (honest!) but she can defeat any system designed to
make sure you take the proper medication at the proper time.

She has one of those 7-day boxes with 4 compartments for each day, but
her success rate is still no better than 70%.

"Oh! I don't seem to have taken Tuesday afternoon's tablets - but
Friday evening's are missing."
--
Sam Plusnet
Jenny M Benson
2019-10-29 21:11:56 UTC
Permalink
"Oh!  I don't seem to have taken Tuesday afternoon's tablets - but
Friday evening's are missing."
I often only really know what day of the week it is because of what it
says on the back of my Pioglitazone strip. Trouble is, as I don't
always remember to take my tablets, I have to remember whether to-day
really is what the tablets say it is, or did I forget to take them
yesterday.
--
Jenny M Benson
http://jennygenes.blogspot.co.uk/
Vicky Ayech
2019-10-29 21:48:20 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 29 Oct 2019 21:11:56 +0000, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
"Oh!  I don't seem to have taken Tuesday afternoon's tablets - but
Friday evening's are missing."
I often only really know what day of the week it is because of what it
says on the back of my Pioglitazone strip. Trouble is, as I don't
always remember to take my tablets, I have to remember whether to-day
really is what the tablets say it is, or did I forget to take them
yesterday.
Alexa can tell you the day and time :) I want the wrist watch version
to take around for outside the house. I often have questions when
walking the dog or swimming.
Mike
2019-10-30 09:00:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Tue, 29 Oct 2019 21:11:56 +0000, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
"Oh!  I don't seem to have taken Tuesday afternoon's tablets - but
Friday evening's are missing."
I often only really know what day of the week it is because of what it
says on the back of my Pioglitazone strip. Trouble is, as I don't
always remember to take my tablets, I have to remember whether to-day
really is what the tablets say it is, or did I forget to take them
yesterday.
Alexa can tell you the day and time :) I want the wrist watch version
to take around for outside the house. I often have questions when
walking the dog or swimming.
But as The Amazon system requires wi-fi, your doggie would have to get used
to just walking around the premises or a circle!
--
Toodle Pip
BrritSki
2019-10-30 09:05:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by Vicky Ayech
Alexa can tell you the day and time :) I want the wrist watch version
to take around for outside the house. I often have questions when
walking the dog or swimming.
But as The Amazon system requires wi-fi,
I think what it really requires is *internet* which it can get through a
bluetooth connection to your smartphone assuming you have some data
allowance left on it.
Mike
2019-10-30 09:12:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by BrritSki
Post by Mike
Post by Vicky Ayech
Alexa can tell you the day and time :) I want the wrist watch version
to take around for outside the house. I often have questions when
walking the dog or swimming.
But as The Amazon system requires wi-fi,
I think what it really requires is *internet* which it can get through a
bluetooth connection to your smartphone assuming you have some data
allowance left on it.
Oh yes, of course; Vicky don’t forget to take your smartphone with you when
you go ‘walkies’ - you could set a reminder on your Alexa assistant....
--
Toodle Pip
krw
2019-10-30 09:41:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by BrritSki
Post by Mike
Post by Vicky Ayech
Alexa can tell you the day and time :) I want the wrist watch version
to take around for outside the house. I often have questions when
walking the dog or swimming.
But as The Amazon system requires wi-fi,
I think what it really requires is *internet* which it can get through a
bluetooth connection to your smartphone assuming you have some data
allowance left on it.
Oh yes, of course; Vicky don’t forget to take your smartphone with you when
you go ‘walkies’ - you could set a reminder on your Alexa assistant....
And don't forget the dog either you will look really stupid!
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Mike
2019-10-30 09:57:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by krw
Post by Mike
Post by BrritSki
Post by Mike
Post by Vicky Ayech
Alexa can tell you the day and time :) I want the wrist watch version
to take around for outside the house. I often have questions when
walking the dog or swimming.
But as The Amazon system requires wi-fi,
I think what it really requires is *internet* which it can get through a
bluetooth connection to your smartphone assuming you have some data
allowance left on it.
Oh yes, of course; Vicky don’t forget to take your smartphone with you when
you go ‘walkies’ - you could set a reminder on your Alexa assistant....
And don't forget the dog either you will look really stupid!
But, Toby serious for a moment, if you have a smart phone, you could use
Alexa on that, or even Siri or another app!
--
Toodle Pip
Mike
2019-10-30 10:01:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by krw
Post by Mike
Post by BrritSki
Post by Mike
Post by Vicky Ayech
Alexa can tell you the day and time :) I want the wrist watch version
to take around for outside the house. I often have questions when
walking the dog or swimming.
But as The Amazon system requires wi-fi,
I think what it really requires is *internet* which it can get through a
bluetooth connection to your smartphone assuming you have some data
allowance left on it.
Oh yes, of course; Vicky don’t forget to take your smartphone with you when
you go ‘walkies’ - you could set a reminder on your Alexa assistant....
And don't forget the dog either you will look really stupid!
But, Toby serious for a moment, if you have a smart phone, you could use
Alexa on that, or even Siri or another app!
Sometimes when returning home on a bus, I use my iPhone to tell Alexa to
‘play Radio Four’ for me so it is already on when I unlock the front door.
At least I did until Auntie messed with ‘Tune In’... ho-hum.
--
Toodle Pip
Penny
2019-10-30 18:19:16 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 30 Oct 2019 10:01:34 GMT, Mike <***@ntlworld.com> scrawled
in the dust...
Post by Mike
Sometimes when returning home on a bus, I use my iPhone to tell Alexa to
‘play Radio Four’ for me so it is already on when I unlock the front door.
At least I did until Auntie messed with ‘Tune In’... ho-hum.
You mean you turn the radio off when you go out?
I never do that. I do turn it off when watching TV or listening to
something on the puter but if I'm away for a few days it stays on - whether
to keep the house happy* or deter burglars, I'm not sure.

*I was once friendly with a sculptor and his family who lived on an
isolated property out in the wilds of North Essex. I would turn up there
out-of-the-blue if I were at a loose end or generally in the area and have
a cup of tea and maybe a game of chess with the small son (who always beat
me). I showed up one day, was greeted by the dog (called Puppy, though she
was quite old by then), wandered into the house but could find no one
around. I heard the radio playing in the studio so I went in there too but
no one was there either. I mentioned this visit to his wife next time I saw
her and she said he always left the radio on in the studio to keep the
sculptures (mostly fairly abstract figures) company.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
DavidK
2019-10-31 08:48:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jenny M Benson
"Oh!  I don't seem to have taken Tuesday afternoon's tablets - but
Friday evening's are missing."
I often only really know what day of the week it is because of what it
says on the back of my Pioglitazone strip.  Trouble is, as I don't
always remember to take my tablets, I have to remember whether to-day
really is what the tablets say it is, or did I forget to take them
yesterday.
My Dad managed to take three day's worth on one day because he didn't
know what day it was. He famously wrote on a piece of paper "today is
Tuesday" as a reminder.

The BBC are just as bad. I go to the download page for the daily Archers
podcast on my phone and the visible entries are labelled 'today',
'yesterday' and 'Monday'. I have to add two days to Monday to find out
whether I need to refresh the page before downloading yesterday's.
Penny
2019-10-31 09:38:32 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 31 Oct 2019 08:48:18 +0000, DavidK <***@invalid.invalid>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by DavidK
My Dad managed to take three day's worth on one day because he didn't
know what day it was. He famously wrote on a piece of paper "today is
Tuesday" as a reminder.
Did he know what time it was?
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Nick Odell
2019-10-31 11:58:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by DavidK
My Dad managed to take three day's worth on one day because he didn't
know what day it was. He famously wrote on a piece of paper "today is
Tuesday" as a reminder.
Did he know what time it was?
My late mother had been burgled a couple of times so although she kept
her money in the bank and didn't keep unnecessarily large amounts at
home, whenever she brought some cash home she hid it in the tea caddy.
Unfortunately, she could never remember that she had hidden it in the
tea caddy until she hit on this brilliant wheeze to remind her: she
left a large sheet of paper on the table in the hall with a note to
herself in big writing saying "The Money is Hidden in the Tea Caddy."

Nick
Sally Thompson
2019-10-31 12:05:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by DavidK
My Dad managed to take three day's worth on one day because he didn't
know what day it was. He famously wrote on a piece of paper "today is
Tuesday" as a reminder.
Did he know what time it was?
My late mother had been burgled a couple of times so although she kept
her money in the bank and didn't keep unnecessarily large amounts at
home, whenever she brought some cash home she hid it in the tea caddy.
Unfortunately, she could never remember that she had hidden it in the
tea caddy until she hit on this brilliant wheeze to remind her: she
left a large sheet of paper on the table in the hall with a note to
herself in big writing saying "The Money is Hidden in the Tea Caddy."
I used to have a neighbour with the surname Monney, and kept a vital PIN
number under his name and address as though it were a phone number. All
went well until I tried to phone him and couldn't understand why I couldn't
get through.
--
Sally in Shropshire, UK
BrritSki
2019-10-31 14:27:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by DavidK
My Dad managed to take three day's worth on one day because he didn't
know what day it was. He famously wrote on a piece of paper "today is
Tuesday" as a reminder.
Did he know what time it was?
My late mother had been burgled a couple of times so although she kept
her money in the bank and didn't keep unnecessarily large amounts at
home, whenever she brought some cash home she hid it in the tea caddy.
Unfortunately, she could never remember that she had hidden it in the
tea caddy until she hit on this brilliant wheeze to remind her: she
left a large sheet of paper on the table in the hall with a note to
herself in big writing saying "The Money is Hidden in the Tea Caddy."
ROFL

That's alright, most thieves are ilette.. ilite... ilitt.. can't read.
Mike
2019-10-31 15:02:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by BrritSki
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by DavidK
My Dad managed to take three day's worth on one day because he didn't
know what day it was. He famously wrote on a piece of paper "today is
Tuesday" as a reminder.
Did he know what time it was?
My late mother had been burgled a couple of times so although she kept
her money in the bank and didn't keep unnecessarily large amounts at
home, whenever she brought some cash home she hid it in the tea caddy.
Unfortunately, she could never remember that she had hidden it in the
tea caddy until she hit on this brilliant wheeze to remind her: she
left a large sheet of paper on the table in the hall with a note to
herself in big writing saying "The Money is Hidden in the Tea Caddy."
ROFL
That's alright, most thieves are ilette.. ilite... ilitt.. can't read.
Knorr rite
--
Toodle Pip
Penny
2019-10-31 15:21:16 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 31 Oct 2019 14:27:23 +0000, BrritSki <***@gmail.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by BrritSki
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by DavidK
My Dad managed to take three day's worth on one day because he didn't
know what day it was. He famously wrote on a piece of paper "today is
Tuesday" as a reminder.
Did he know what time it was?
My late mother had been burgled a couple of times so although she kept
her money in the bank and didn't keep unnecessarily large amounts at
home, whenever she brought some cash home she hid it in the tea caddy.
Unfortunately, she could never remember that she had hidden it in the
tea caddy until she hit on this brilliant wheeze to remind her: she
left a large sheet of paper on the table in the hall with a note to
herself in big writing saying "The Money is Hidden in the Tea Caddy."
ROFL
That's alright, most thieves are ilette.. ilite... ilitt.. can't read.
Sadly, many people who can read, don't.

Penny, writer of instructions, warnings and informative notices who
sometimes gets quite fed up when asked the same questions over and over
again.
Mike
2019-10-31 15:30:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by BrritSki
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by DavidK
My Dad managed to take three day's worth on one day because he didn't
know what day it was. He famously wrote on a piece of paper "today is
Tuesday" as a reminder.
Did he know what time it was?
My late mother had been burgled a couple of times so although she kept
her money in the bank and didn't keep unnecessarily large amounts at
home, whenever she brought some cash home she hid it in the tea caddy.
Unfortunately, she could never remember that she had hidden it in the
tea caddy until she hit on this brilliant wheeze to remind her: she
left a large sheet of paper on the table in the hall with a note to
herself in big writing saying "The Money is Hidden in the Tea Caddy."
ROFL
That's alright, most thieves are ilette.. ilite... ilitt.. can't read.
Sadly, many people who can read, don't.
Penny, writer of instructions, warnings and informative notices who
sometimes gets quite fed up when asked the same questions over and over
again.
‘Beware, this door is alarmed’ or... ‘This door must be kept closed at all
times’ (two of my favourites).
--
Toodle Pip
Nick Odell
2019-10-31 17:32:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by BrritSki
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by DavidK
My Dad managed to take three day's worth on one day because he didn't
know what day it was. He famously wrote on a piece of paper "today is
Tuesday" as a reminder.
Did he know what time it was?
My late mother had been burgled a couple of times so although she kept
her money in the bank and didn't keep unnecessarily large amounts at
home, whenever she brought some cash home she hid it in the tea caddy.
Unfortunately, she could never remember that she had hidden it in the
tea caddy until she hit on this brilliant wheeze to remind her: she
left a large sheet of paper on the table in the hall with a note to
herself in big writing saying "The Money is Hidden in the Tea Caddy."
ROFL
That's alright, most thieves are ilette.. ilite... ilitt.. can't read.
Sadly, many people who can read, don't.
Penny, writer of instructions, warnings and informative notices who
sometimes gets quite fed up when asked the same questions over and over
again.
‘Beware, this door is alarmed’ or... ‘This door must be kept closed at all
times’ (two of my favourites).
My personal favourite was attached to the door of the shower in a
holiday let. Obviously the balance between receiving scalding water
and refrigerated water was very finely tuned because the owners had
written:

"Do not fiddle with knob when in the shower."

Nick
Jenny M Benson
2019-10-31 16:00:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
Penny, writer of instructions, warnings and informative notices who
sometimes gets quite fed up when asked the same questions over and over
again.
Happens with people being interviewed as well. I'm frequently shouting
at the tv "(s)he's just told you that!" And I'm not talking about
politicians giving weasely answers. It happens particularly when it's a
child being interviewed and the person asking the questions has
obviously prepared a set of them and doesn't bother listening to any of
the answers. So you get something like:

Joe Public: It was horrifying. I was really scared.
Interviewer: How did it make you feel?
--
Jenny M Benson
http://jennygenes.blogspot.co.uk/
Penny
2019-10-31 18:37:31 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 31 Oct 2019 16:00:01 +0000, Jenny M Benson <***@hotmail.co.uk>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Penny
Penny, writer of instructions, warnings and informative notices who
sometimes gets quite fed up when asked the same questions over and over
again.
Happens with people being interviewed as well. I'm frequently shouting
at the tv "(s)he's just told you that!" And I'm not talking about
politicians giving weasely answers. It happens particularly when it's a
child being interviewed and the person asking the questions has
obviously prepared a set of them and doesn't bother listening to any of
Joe Public: It was horrifying. I was really scared.
Interviewer: How did it make you feel?
Oh yes :(

I used to get some fun out of seeing how many times I could answer the
question without the asker actually reading what I'd written - it palled
quite quickly.

The other day someone started their query on this particular forum,
"I know there is a doc about this somewhere but it's usually quicker to ask
in the forum."
I translated this as "I'd rather waste your time than mine." and went off
to do something else.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Sam Plusnet
2019-10-31 20:33:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
The other day someone started their query on this particular forum,
"I know there is a doc about this somewhere but it's usually quicker to ask
in the forum."
I translated this as "I'd rather waste your time than mine." and went off
to do something else.
Is that the equivalent of people who ramble on about "it" or "them"
without ever bothering to tell the listener which particular "it" or
"them" they have in mind?
Let the listener do all the heavy lifting.
--
Sam Plusnet
Penny
2019-10-31 22:48:18 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 31 Oct 2019 20:33:14 +0000, Sam Plusnet <***@home.com> scrawled in
the dust...
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Penny
The other day someone started their query on this particular forum,
"I know there is a doc about this somewhere but it's usually quicker to ask
in the forum."
I translated this as "I'd rather waste your time than mine." and went off
to do something else.
Is that the equivalent of people who ramble on about "it" or "them"
without ever bothering to tell the listener which particular "it" or
"them" they have in mind?
Let the listener do all the heavy lifting.
That sounds more like the retail customer who thinks you can read their
mind.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Fenny
2019-10-31 23:38:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Is that the equivalent of people who ramble on about "it" or "them"
without ever bothering to tell the listener which particular "it" or
"them" they have in mind?
Let the listener do all the heavy lifting.
I have started to tell Ma "If you want me to know what you're talking
about, you'll have to actually tell me what you're talking about"
--
Fenny
Chris J Dixon
2019-11-01 08:04:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Fenny
I have started to tell Ma "If you want me to know what you're talking
about, you'll have to actually tell me what you're talking about"
When a sentence tails off, or has too many "whatsit"s, I have
occasionally resorted to saying to BOFE, "Give me a noun."

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk @ChrisJDixon1
Plant amazing Acers.
Steve Hague
2019-11-01 09:38:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by Fenny
I have started to tell Ma "If you want me to know what you're talking
about, you'll have to actually tell me what you're talking about"
When a sentence tails off, or has too many "whatsit"s, I have
occasionally resorted to saying to BOFE, "Give me a noun."
Chris
Wofe will often say something like "Pass me that from over there, will
you?" whilst making a vague gesture towards half the house. When I reply
"Pass you what from over where?" she gets irritated and claims I'm just
being awkward, and that her sister would would have known what she meant
straight away. Her sister is much less tolerant of this than I am.
Stev
krw
2019-11-01 10:06:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Steve Hague
Wofe will often say something like "Pass me that from over there, will
you?" whilst making a vague gesture towards half the house.
I thought she was still married to me.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2019-11-01 12:26:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by krw
Post by Steve Hague
Wofe will often say something like "Pass me that from over there,
will you?" whilst making a vague gesture towards half the house.
I thought she was still married to me.
LOL
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

As the man said when confronted by a large dinner salad, "This isn't food.
This is what food eats."
Tony Smith Gloucestershire
2019-11-01 10:56:44 UTC
Permalink
On Friday, 1 November 2019 09:38:02 UTC, Steve Hague wrote:

<snipped>
Post by Steve Hague
Wofe will often say something like "Pass me that from over there, will
you?" whilst making a vague gesture towards half the house.
<snipped>

MacPhee, in "That Hideous Strength" uses a similar example to illustrate his claim that women use a language devoid of nouns.
Nick Odell
2019-11-01 12:16:00 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 1 Nov 2019 03:56:44 -0700 (PDT), Tony Smith Gloucestershire
Post by Tony Smith Gloucestershire
<snipped>
Post by Steve Hague
Wofe will often say something like "Pass me that from over there, will
you?" whilst making a vague gesture towards half the house.
<snipped>
MacPhee, in "That Hideous Strength" uses a similar example to illustrate his claim that women use a language devoid of nouns.
Yebbut, the author wasn't right there in the vanguard of the women's
equality movement: I don't recall any male 40s/50s writer who was.

Nick
Sid Nuncius
2019-11-01 18:10:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony Smith Gloucestershire
<snipped>
Post by Steve Hague
Wofe will often say something like "Pass me that from over there, will
you?" whilst making a vague gesture towards half the house.
<snipped>
MacPhee, in "That Hideous Strength" uses a similar example to illustrate his claim that women use a language devoid of nouns.
My experience is that, after 40-odd years together, wofe and I find that
one of us can say something like "You know that actor - he was in that
thing we saw..." and the other one will often know exactly who is meant.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Sam Plusnet
2019-11-01 19:42:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Tony Smith Gloucestershire
<snipped>
Post by Steve Hague
Wofe will often say something like "Pass me that from over there, will
you?" whilst making a vague gesture towards half the house.
<snipped>
MacPhee, in "That Hideous Strength" uses a similar example to
illustrate his claim that women use a language devoid of nouns.
My experience is that, after 40-odd years together, wofe and I find that
one of us can say something like "You know that actor - he was in that
thing we saw..." and the other one will often know exactly who is meant.
Yes. But that leads to the situation where, whenever you actually fail
to read your spouse's mind, you are castigated for "being difficult".
--
Sam Plusnet
steveski
2019-11-01 21:39:07 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 01 Nov 2019 19:42:01 +0000, Sam Plusnet wrote:

[snip]
Post by Sam Plusnet
Yes. But that leads to the situation where, whenever you actually fail
to read your spouse's mind, you are castigated
The unkindest cut of all.

IGMC
--
Steveski
Mike
2019-11-01 21:58:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by steveski
[snip]
Post by Sam Plusnet
Yes. But that leads to the situation where, whenever you actually fail
to read your spouse's mind, you are castigated
The unkindest cut of all.
IGMC
Is that your jock strap over there Steveski?
--
Toodle Pip
steveski
2019-11-01 22:31:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by steveski
[snip]
Post by Sam Plusnet
Yes. But that leads to the situation where, whenever you actually
fail to read your spouse's mind, you are castigated
The unkindest cut of all.
IGMC
Is that your jock strap over there Steveski?
No, it's someone else's - which is why it's so much fun.
--
Steveski
Fenny
2019-11-01 22:45:15 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 1 Nov 2019 18:10:29 +0000, Sid Nuncius
Post by Sid Nuncius
My experience is that, after 40-odd years together, wofe and I find that
one of us can say something like "You know that actor - he was in that
thing we saw..." and the other one will often know exactly who is meant.
At least you have a clue with "actor".

I often have conversations with Ma that go along the lines of:

Ma: You remember that bloke from Ealing. [1]
Me: Which bloke from Ealing?
Ma: The one with the dog.
Me: Nope
Ma: He had a caravan.
Me: I'm sure he did, but I don't know him, so don't remember him.
Ma: Yes you do. I told you about him. [2]
Me: Give me a clue.
Ma: He came on the course at Whirlow and really liked Sheffield.
Me: That could have been any of the people who came on training here.
Ma: Well, anyway... [3]

[1] Ma used to work for a company that sold college management
software, so he would have worked at the college in Ealing. I have
never knowingly met anyone who worked at the college in Ealing.
[2] In 1985/6. I may have slept since then.
[3] Some totally random story that I'm supposed to have an opinion
about which coincides with her view on the matter.
--
Fenny
Penny
2019-11-02 09:09:12 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 01 Nov 2019 22:45:15 +0000, Fenny <***@removethis.gmail.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Fenny
On Fri, 1 Nov 2019 18:10:29 +0000, Sid Nuncius
Post by Sid Nuncius
My experience is that, after 40-odd years together, wofe and I find that
one of us can say something like "You know that actor - he was in that
thing we saw..." and the other one will often know exactly who is meant.
At least you have a clue with "actor".
Ma: You remember that bloke from Ealing. [1]
Me: Which bloke from Ealing?
Ma: The one with the dog.
Me: Nope
Ma: He had a caravan.
Me: I'm sure he did, but I don't know him, so don't remember him.
Ma: Yes you do. I told you about him. [2]
Me: Give me a clue.
Ma: He came on the course at Whirlow and really liked Sheffield.
Me: That could have been any of the people who came on training here.
Ma: Well, anyway... [3]
[1] Ma used to work for a company that sold college management
software, so he would have worked at the college in Ealing. I have
never knowingly met anyone who worked at the college in Ealing.
[2] In 1985/6. I may have slept since then.
[3] Some totally random story that I'm supposed to have an opinion
about which coincides with her view on the matter.
Okay, these are her hooks to the story. They are not for you and don't
really matter but it's her way of recalling what she wanted to say to you*.
Just make non-comittal noises or ask "What about him?"

*which may also be irrelevant but just be pleased she knows who you are, is
aware of shared history and wants to communicate.

I'm sure I ramble in similar fashion at times. I know I often tell the same
tale twice to one daughter and don't tell it to the other one at all. My
database needs rebuilding :(
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Mike
2019-11-01 12:51:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by Fenny
I have started to tell Ma "If you want me to know what you're talking
about, you'll have to actually tell me what you're talking about"
When a sentence tails off, or has too many "whatsit"s, I have
occasionally resorted to saying to BOFE, "Give me a noun."
Chris
Wofe will often say something like "Pass me that from over there, will
you?" whilst making a vague gesture towards half the house. When I reply
"Pass you what from over where?" she gets irritated and claims I'm just
being awkward, and that her sister would would have known what she meant
straight away. Her sister is much less tolerant of this than I am.
Stev
Perhaps the telepathic skills need honing - or she tries telekinesis!
--
Toodle Pip
Jenny M Benson
2019-11-04 14:23:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by Steve Hague
Wofe will often say something like "Pass me that from over there, will
you?" whilst making a vague gesture towards half the house. When I reply
"Pass you what from over where?" she gets irritated and claims I'm just
being awkward, and that her sister would would have known what she meant
straight away. Her sister is much less tolerant of this than I am.
I asked my sister yesterday "Who's the other woman who wasn't Liz
Fraser?" She knew immediately who I meant ... but unfortunately she
couldn't remember her name either!
--
Jenny M Benson
http://jennygenes.blogspot.co.uk/
krw
2019-11-04 14:32:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Steve Hague
Wofe will often say something like "Pass me that from over there, will
you?" whilst making a vague gesture towards half the house. When I
reply "Pass you what from over where?" she gets irritated and claims
I'm just being awkward, and that her sister would would have known
what she meant straight away. Her sister is much less tolerant of this
than I am.
I asked my sister yesterday "Who's the other woman who wasn't Liz
Fraser?"  She knew immediately who I meant ... but unfortunately she
couldn't remember her name either!
Dilys Laye?
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Jenny M Benson
2019-11-04 21:28:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by krw
Post by Jenny M Benson
I asked my sister yesterday "Who's the other woman who wasn't Liz
Fraser?"  She knew immediately who I meant ... but unfortunately she
couldn't remember her name either!
Dilys Laye?
No - Joan Sims. (I didn't havet'internet available at the time, but
have now looked her up.)
--
Jenny M Benson
http://jennygenes.blogspot.co.uk/
Nick Odell
2019-11-07 11:48:50 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 4 Nov 2019 21:28:42 +0000, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by krw
Post by Jenny M Benson
I asked my sister yesterday "Who's the other woman who wasn't Liz
Fraser?"  She knew immediately who I meant ... but unfortunately she
couldn't remember her name either!
Dilys Laye?
No - Joan Sims. (I didn't havet'internet available at the time, but
have now looked her up.)
I knew immediately who you meant but couldn't remember the name
either.

Nick

Nick Odell
2019-11-01 12:19:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by Fenny
I have started to tell Ma "If you want me to know what you're talking
about, you'll have to actually tell me what you're talking about"
When a sentence tails off, or has too many "whatsit"s, I have
occasionally resorted to saying to BOFE, "Give me a noun."
I don't know if "BOFE" translates into "Carol" but I am sitting here
imagining a game of "Domestic Countdown."

Give me a noun, Carol.

Another noun.

Another noun, please, Carol.

Now a verb.

And another verb

(Dum de-dah, dum de-da, de de de de de de - boing!)


Nick
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2019-11-01 12:31:03 UTC
Permalink
In message <***@4ax.com>, Nick Odell
<***@themusicworkshop.plus.com> writes:
[]
Post by Nick Odell
I don't know if "BOFE" translates into "Carol" but I am sitting here
imagining a game of "Domestic Countdown."
Give me a noun, Carol.
Another noun.
Another noun, please, Carol.
Now a verb.
And another verb
(Dum de-dah, dum de-da, de de de de de de - boing!)
Nick
http://www.televisiontunes.com/Countdown_-_Countdown_Music.html
(Warning: that website is addictive ...)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

As the man said when confronted by a large dinner salad, "This isn't food.
This is what food eats."
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2019-11-01 12:26:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by Fenny
I have started to tell Ma "If you want me to know what you're talking
about, you'll have to actually tell me what you're talking about"
When a sentence tails off, or has too many "whatsit"s, I have
occasionally resorted to saying to BOFE, "Give me a noun."
Chris
There was allegedly a point at the UN, EC, or similar body, where the
translation from German dried up, and people angrily pressed their
buttons or whatever, at which the translator shrugged helplessly and
said "J'attend le verbe!" (I'm waiting for the verb.) Many will know
that the Germans their words in a funny order put, and politicians I
presume make it an art form. (I rather like German word order, among
many other things about the Language; I often notice that my phrasing is
a bit odd, and it might be German influence. [For example "and
politicians ..." in this paragraph feels slightly odd, though not
incorrect.])
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

As the man said when confronted by a large dinner salad, "This isn't food.
This is what food eats."
Chris McMillan
2019-11-01 15:23:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Fenny
Post by Sam Plusnet
Is that the equivalent of people who ramble on about "it" or "them"
without ever bothering to tell the listener which particular "it" or
"them" they have in mind?
Let the listener do all the heavy lifting.
I have started to tell Ma "If you want me to know what you're talking
about, you'll have to actually tell me what you're talking about"
Mike says it to me all the time!

Sincerely Chris
Mike
2019-11-01 15:30:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Fenny
Post by Sam Plusnet
Is that the equivalent of people who ramble on about "it" or "them"
without ever bothering to tell the listener which particular "it" or
"them" they have in mind?
Let the listener do all the heavy lifting.
I have started to tell Ma "If you want me to know what you're talking
about, you'll have to actually tell me what you're talking about"
Mike says it to me all the time!
Sincerely Chris
The problem is I’m still on version 1.0.0.0 of the mind reading app! ;-)))
--
Toodle Pip
Sam Plusnet
2019-11-01 19:45:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Fenny
Post by Sam Plusnet
Is that the equivalent of people who ramble on about "it" or "them"
without ever bothering to tell the listener which particular "it" or
"them" they have in mind?
Let the listener do all the heavy lifting.
I have started to tell Ma "If you want me to know what you're talking
about, you'll have to actually tell me what you're talking about"
Mike says it to me all the time!
Sincerely Chris
The problem is I’m still on version 1.0.0.0 of the mind reading app! ;-)))
But neither you nor Chris will be aware of how often domestic telepathy
actually does work.
--
Sam Plusnet
Chris McMillan
2019-11-02 10:03:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Mike
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Fenny
Post by Sam Plusnet
Is that the equivalent of people who ramble on about "it" or "them"
without ever bothering to tell the listener which particular "it" or
"them" they have in mind?
Let the listener do all the heavy lifting.
I have started to tell Ma "If you want me to know what you're talking
about, you'll have to actually tell me what you're talking about"
Mike says it to me all the time!
Sincerely Chris
The problem is I’m still on version 1.0.0.0 of the mind reading app! ;-)))
But neither you nor Chris will be aware of how often domestic telepathy
actually does work.
It just doesn’t. But I didn’t grow up with anyone it could happen with.

Sincerely Chris
Penny
2019-11-02 10:49:45 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 02 Nov 2019 10:03:13 GMT, Chris McMillan
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Mike
The problem is I’m still on version 1.0.0.0 of the mind reading app! ;-)))
But neither you nor Chris will be aware of how often domestic telepathy
actually does work.
It just doesn’t. But I didn’t grow up with anyone it could happen with.
What freaks me out, time and again, is the way d#2, with whom I have not
lived since 2007, contacts me to discuss something I have been thinking
about but have not yet mentioned to anyone.

Maybe that's why she always assumes I can read her mind. I think I've
finally persuaded her of the need to ask direct questions, and to ask for
help when she needs it. She's given up on a few friends over the years
because she didn't understand they couldn't read her mind.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Jenny M Benson
2019-11-04 14:20:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by Fenny
Post by Sam Plusnet
Is that the equivalent of people who ramble on about "it" or "them"
without ever bothering to tell the listener which particular "it" or
"them" they have in mind?
Let the listener do all the heavy lifting.
I have started to tell Ma "If you want me to know what you're talking
about, you'll have to actually tell me what you're talking about"
I frequently answer the 'phone to my daughter and the first thing she
says is something like "Well! I think it's disgraceful!" To which I
reply "I quite agree" and the conversation continues in like vein for
quite a while until one of us admits defeat and either has to ask what
the other is on about or explain further.
--
Jenny M Benson
http://jennygenes.blogspot.co.uk/
Serena Blanchflower
2019-11-01 11:12:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Is that the equivalent of people who ramble on about "it" or "them"
without ever bothering to tell the listener which particular "it" or
"them" they have in mind?
Let the listener do all the heavy lifting.
Someone I used to know was a past mistress of this. The trouble was
that, by the time I thought I'd just about worked out which "it" and
"them" she was talking about, she'd have moved on and it would be
different ones :(
--
Best wishes, Serena
Blessed are the cracked, for they shall let in the light (Groucho Marx)
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2019-11-01 02:19:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
[]
Post by Penny
Post by Jenny M Benson
Joe Public: It was horrifying. I was really scared.
Interviewer: How did it make you feel?
Mine dew, _any_ interviewer who asks the "how do you feel" gets my
despisement (what _is_ the word? I can never remember). There was a time
when it seemed on the wane, but it's come back, though usually in not
quite those words.
Post by Penny
Oh yes :(
I've always thought that if _I_ was asked it - at least, if after some
disaster, bereavement, or similar - I would visit some violence on the
asker. Preferably with as much audience as possible, for the benefit of
all other "victims" of the question.
Post by Penny
I used to get some fun out of seeing how many times I could answer the
question without the asker actually reading what I'd written - it palled
quite quickly.
The other day someone started their query on this particular forum,
"I know there is a doc about this somewhere but it's usually quicker to ask
in the forum."
I translated this as "I'd rather waste your time than mine." and went off
to do something else.
I'm not _entirely_ against the question, especially if the case is "I
could find the answer but it would take me ages - but I think there's
probably someone here who knows straight away". Sort of a variation of
spoken in a room "what was the name of that chap who xyz, again?". If
asked with such an intent in a forum/newsgroup, it's only polite to say
something like "if you know", "don't spend long", or similar.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Back then, many radio sets were still in black and white. - Eddie Mair, radio
presenter, on "PM" programme reaching 40; in Radio Times, 3-9 April 2010
Penny
2019-11-01 08:58:13 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 1 Nov 2019 02:19:40 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Penny
The other day someone started their query on this particular forum,
"I know there is a doc about this somewhere but it's usually quicker to ask
in the forum."
I translated this as "I'd rather waste your time than mine." and went off
to do something else.
I'm not _entirely_ against the question, especially if the case is "I
could find the answer but it would take me ages - but I think there's
probably someone here who knows straight away". Sort of a variation of
spoken in a room "what was the name of that chap who xyz, again?". If
asked with such an intent in a forum/newsgroup, it's only polite to say
something like "if you know", "don't spend long", or similar.
I should perhaps have mentioned that elsewhere in the related fora, several
people were asking, about other questions which had been answered on the
forum, "Where does it say that? It's not documented" and off-forum I was
dealing with emails about improving the documentation.

I'm good at looking stuff up but could wish others had those skills too.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
krw
2019-10-31 23:24:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
writer of instructions, warnings and informative notices who
sometimes gets quite fed up when asked the same questions over and over
again.
Earlier this week our charity website was updated to say very precisely
what we do and when we do it.

Tonight an email arrives saying that the website does not make it clear
what we do and asking questions I know that were put on the website
earlier this week. I feel your pain!
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
krw
2019-10-31 13:54:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by DavidK
My Dad managed to take three day's worth on one day because he didn't
know what day it was. He famously wrote on a piece of paper "today is
Tuesday" as a reminder.
Did he know what time it was?
Only if he was called Eccles.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Sam Plusnet
2019-10-31 20:33:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by krw
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by DavidK
My Dad managed to take three day's worth on one day because he didn't
know what day it was. He famously wrote on a piece of paper "today is
Tuesday" as a reminder.
Did he know what time it was?
Only if he was called Eccles.
Piece of cake then?
--
Sam Plusnet
Peter Percival
2019-11-01 14:26:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
https://www.caring.com/articles/caregiver-technology/
Scary.
Loading...