Discussion:
OT: Vagenuary update.
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BrritSki
2020-01-10 13:16:39 UTC
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It is not going well. Waife says it is not very filling and she needs
something more substantial inside her, so we are back to meat and two veg.

We are going to give dry January a try though...
Mike
2020-01-10 13:22:49 UTC
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Post by BrritSki
It is not going well. Waife says it is not very filling and she needs
something more substantial inside her, so we are back to meat and two veg.
We are going to give dry January a try though...
Err... this is a message from BrritSki isn’t it? Should we be seeing an
alternative message here???;-)))
--
Toodle Pip
Peter Percival
2020-01-10 15:11:17 UTC
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Post by Mike
Post by BrritSki
It is not going well. Waife says it is not very filling and she needs
something more substantial inside her, so we are back to meat and two veg.
We are going to give dry January a try though...
Err... this is a message from BrritSki isn’t it? Should we be seeing an
alternative message here???;-)))
You want him to withdraw?
Paul Herber
2020-01-10 14:41:23 UTC
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Post by BrritSki
It is not going well. Waife says it is not very filling and she needs
something more substantial inside her, so we are back to meat and two veg.
We are going to give dry January a try though...
Reminds me of the Janet and John episode concerning winkles in cider ...
--
Regards, Paul Herber
https://www.paulherber.co.uk/
Mike
2020-01-10 15:07:24 UTC
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Post by Paul Herber
Post by BrritSki
It is not going well. Waife says it is not very filling and she needs
something more substantial inside her, so we are back to meat and two veg.
We are going to give dry January a try though...
Reminds me of the Janet and John episode concerning winkles in cider ...
Might this be ‘A version according to TerryWogan’ I wonder?;-)
--
Toodle Pip
Paul Herber
2020-01-10 15:58:32 UTC
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Post by Paul Herber
Post by BrritSki
It is not going well. Waife says it is not very filling and she needs
something more substantial inside her, so we are back to meat and two veg.
We are going to give dry January a try though...
Reminds me of the Janet and John episode concerning winkles in cider ...
Might this be ‘A version according to TerryWogan’ I wonder?;-)
Spot on, Mr McT!
--
Regards, Paul Herber
https://www.paulherber.co.uk/
Vicky Ayech
2020-01-10 18:03:58 UTC
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Post by Paul Herber
Post by Paul Herber
Post by BrritSki
It is not going well. Waife says it is not very filling and she needs
something more substantial inside her, so we are back to meat and two veg.
We are going to give dry January a try though...
Reminds me of the Janet and John episode concerning winkles in cider ...
Might this be ‘A version according to TerryWogan’ I wonder?;-)
Spot on, Mr McT!
I just watched Veganville e1 on the iplayer. ANyone else seen it?
They didn't show much of the animals, pigs, being gassed but the bit
they did show was upsetting. I'm not sure how well the project will
do. I also wonder how they funded it. I suppose the BBC might have
paid as that would still be a cheap programme, even with giving away
lots of food. The people involved were very much more effective than I
expected.
John Ashby
2020-01-10 19:37:48 UTC
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Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by Paul Herber
Post by Mike
Post by Paul Herber
Post by BrritSki
It is not going well. Waife says it is not very filling and she needs
something more substantial inside her, so we are back to meat and two veg.
We are going to give dry January a try though...
Reminds me of the Janet and John episode concerning winkles in cider ...
Might this be ‘A version according to TerryWogan’ I wonder?;-)
Spot on, Mr McT!
I just watched Veganville e1 on the iplayer. ANyone else seen it?
They didn't show much of the animals, pigs, being gassed but the bit
they did show was upsetting. I'm not sure how well the project will
do. I also wonder how they funded it. I suppose the BBC might have
paid as that would still be a cheap programme, even with giving away
lots of food. The people involved were very much more effective than I
expected.
Cheaper than Newswatch?

john
Mike
2020-01-11 15:39:22 UTC
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Post by John Ashby
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by Paul Herber
Post by Mike
Post by Paul Herber
Post by BrritSki
It is not going well. Waife says it is not very filling and she needs
something more substantial inside her, so we are back to meat and two veg.
We are going to give dry January a try though...
Reminds me of the Janet and John episode concerning winkles in cider ...
Might this be ‘A version according to TerryWogan’ I wonder?;-)
Spot on, Mr McT!
I just watched Veganville e1 on the iplayer. ANyone else seen it?
They didn't show much of the animals, pigs, being gassed but the bit
they did show was upsetting. I'm not sure how well the project will
do. I also wonder how they funded it. I suppose the BBC might have
paid as that would still be a cheap programme, even with giving away
lots of food. The people involved were very much more effective than I
expected.
Cheaper than Newswatch?
john
Vaguely in the right thread: we tried the vegan meat-free mince from Lidl
today; I made a spaghetti bolognese type dish with it plus green sweet
pepper, onion, mushroom, celery and home made sauce. Verdict: very
acceptable indeed (NB, though I added the mince as one lump to the pan and
then broke it up as it cooked, we found that the lumps [about 0.5 to 1
teaspoonful in size] tasted best rather than the smaller pieces as the
texture and mouth feel seemed best that way.) would we eat it again? Most
definitely!
--
Toodle Pip
Serena Blanchflower
2020-01-11 16:40:17 UTC
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Post by Mike
Vaguely in the right thread: we tried the vegan meat-free mince from Lidl
today;
Out of interest, what was it made from? I'm assuming it wasn't minced
vegan ;)
--
Best wishes, Serena
Nostalgia isn't what it used to be. Nor is there any future in it.
Sjouke Burry
2020-01-11 16:50:07 UTC
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Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Mike
Vaguely in the right thread: we tried the vegan meat-free mince from Lidl
today;
Out of interest, what was it made from? I'm assuming it wasn't minced
vegan ;)
I wonder how that would taste........
Penny
2020-01-12 07:43:57 UTC
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On Sat, 11 Jan 2020 16:55:39 GMT, Mike <***@ntlworld.com> scrawled
in the dust...
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Mike
Vaguely in the right thread: we tried the vegan meat-free mince from Lidl
today;
Out of interest, what was it made from? I'm assuming it wasn't minced
vegan ;)
Mainly pea, wheat and soya protein.
Not a choice for the wheat or soya intolerant then.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Kate B
2020-01-12 16:00:01 UTC
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<snip>
Post by Mike
Vaguely in the right thread: we tried the vegan meat-free mince from Lidl
today; I made a spaghetti bolognese type dish with it plus green sweet
pepper, onion, mushroom, celery and home made sauce. Verdict: very
acceptable indeed (NB, though I added the mince as one lump to the pan and
then broke it up as it cooked, we found that the lumps [about 0.5 to 1
teaspoonful in size] tasted best rather than the smaller pieces as the
texture and mouth feel seemed best that way.) would we eat it again? Most
definitely!
As #1 daughter is vegan I've tried lots of differnt vegan foods. Meals
which don't try to be meat are often very good but also we've had
takeaway from ones that ape all the usual things, burgers etc, and
they taste pretty much like meat and seem similar in texture.
Of frozen meals like Linda McC or own brand or Quorn some are very
good and some I like less. The variety is huge now. There are many
vegan restaurants, but still not many chains do enough vegan variety.
Veggie yes, not vegan. Same with school dinners.
But going true vegan is really difficult. Difficult enough for someone
who has ample time to shop carefully and read all the labels and who is
specifically catering for vegans. But if you have to provide food
economically for a large and variable community, as in a school, then I
think it's probably nigh on impossible. Vegetarian, yes, absolutely, but
vegan?

I've also never seen the point of synthetic protein, usually highly
processed, pretending to be meat. There are whole countries-full of
wonderful vegetarian recipes which make the most of colours and flavours
and textures and which are not expensive either. I'd much rather eat
like that most days and have a small piece of humanely raised meat now
and then. But then I have never minded looking a lamb in the eye and
appreciating its youth and beauty, and then sitting down to lamb chops
for dinner.
--
Kate B
London
Clive Arthur
2020-01-12 23:49:14 UTC
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On 12/01/2020 16:00, Kate B wrote:

<snipped>

I'd much rather eat
Post by Kate B
like that most days and have a small piece of humanely raised meat now
and then.
But that's much more restrictive than a vegan diet - and as you will
know that's cloud cuckoo land for most consumers. Do you never eat out?
Meat is almost always industrial food production.

And this 'humanely raised' business. How then can it be humanely
killed? By which I mean humanely slaughtered, humanely sliced and
humanely cut into a 'small piece' for your occasional consumption. Yum.

And I'm not 'getting at' you personally, I just think your position is
logically untenable. (Unless you're a theist, in which case I am
'getting at' you.)

Cheers
--
Clive
Jim Easterbrook
2020-01-13 08:42:43 UTC
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Post by Clive Arthur
<snipped>
I'd much rather eat
Post by Kate B
like that most days and have a small piece of humanely raised meat now
and then.
But that's much more restrictive than a vegan diet - and as you will
know that's cloud cuckoo land for most consumers. Do you never eat out?
Meat is almost always industrial food production.
Yes, in a high street burger chain. In higher quality establishments I
wouldn't be so sure. Anyway, it's still worth choosing to eat good
quality meat when possible.

I don't see why it should be cloud cuckoo land. The meat I buy (by mail
order) is not significantly more expensive than supermarket free range
stuff. And by eating smaller amounts (e.g. 100g steak at a sitting) it
remains affordable.
Post by Clive Arthur
And this 'humanely raised' business. How then can it be humanely
killed? By which I mean humanely slaughtered, humanely sliced and
humanely cut into a 'small piece' for your occasional consumption. Yum.
I don't see a problem with that.
--
Jim <http://www.jim-easterbrook.me.uk/>
1959/1985? M B+ G+ A L- I- S- P-- CH0(p) Ar++ T+ H0 Q--- Sh0
Jane Vernon
2020-01-13 08:54:49 UTC
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Post by Clive Arthur
<snipped>
 I'd much rather eat
Post by Kate B
like that most days and have a small piece of humanely raised meat now
and then.
But that's much more restrictive than a vegan diet - and as you will
know that's cloud cuckoo land for most consumers. Do you never eat out?
Meat is almost always industrial food production.
And this 'humanely raised' business.  How then can it be humanely
killed?  By which I mean humanely slaughtered, humanely sliced and
humanely cut into a 'small piece' for your occasional consumption.  Yum.
And I'm not 'getting at' you personally, I just think your position is
logically untenable.  (Unless you're a theist, in which case I am
'getting at' you.)
Gosh, that's a strange view, Clive. Can you explain it?
I can't see why it's restrictive at all. And I think many people try to
eat more veggie things and some properly raised meat occasionally these
days.
--
Jane
The Potter in the Purple socks - to reply, please remove PURPLE
BTME

http://www.clothandclay.co.uk/umra/cookbook.htm - Umrats' recipes
BrritSki
2020-01-13 10:05:37 UTC
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Post by Clive Arthur
<snipped>
  I'd much rather eat
Post by Kate B
like that most days and have a small piece of humanely raised meat
now and then.
But that's much more restrictive than a vegan diet - and as you will
know that's cloud cuckoo land for most consumers. Do you never eat
out? Meat is almost always industrial food production.
And this 'humanely raised' business.  How then can it be humanely
killed?  By which I mean humanely slaughtered, humanely sliced and
humanely cut into a 'small piece' for your occasional consumption.  Yum.
And I'm not 'getting at' you personally, I just think your position is
logically untenable.  (Unless you're a theist, in which case I am
'getting at' you.)
Gosh, that's a strange view, Clive.  Can you explain it?
I can't see why it's restrictive at all.  And I think many people try to
eat more veggie things and some properly raised meat occasionally these
days.
<lw> to you and to Jim above...
Kate B
2020-01-13 11:49:27 UTC
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Permalink
Post by BrritSki
Post by Clive Arthur
<snipped>
  I'd much rather eat
Post by Kate B
like that most days and have a small piece of humanely raised meat
now and then.
But that's much more restrictive than a vegan diet - and as you will
know that's cloud cuckoo land for most consumers. Do you never eat
out? Meat is almost always industrial food production.
And this 'humanely raised' business.  How then can it be humanely
killed?  By which I mean humanely slaughtered, humanely sliced and
humanely cut into a 'small piece' for your occasional consumption.  Yum.
And I'm not 'getting at' you personally, I just think your position
is logically untenable.  (Unless you're a theist, in which case I am
'getting at' you.)
Gosh, that's a strange view, Clive.  Can you explain it?
I can't see why it's restrictive at all.  And I think many people try
to eat more veggie things and some properly raised meat occasionally
these days.
<lw> to you and to Jim above...
and from me. Of course an animal can be humanely raised, with access to
natural grazing and foodstuffs, and not all cramped together in some
hangar. An animal can also be humanely slaughtered, where it is stunned
and unconscious before being killed. Yes I know there are and have been
abuses of this practice, as far as I can find out I do not buy meat from
such sources. In fact, even when it is not stunned first, it can be
humane: I meant it about the lamb - in a camp half-way up Nanga Parbat
we were greeted by friends of our hosts, one of whom looked like all the
pictures of the Good Shepherd you have ever seen, with a lamb on his
shoulders. After a bit he swung the lamb down, talking gently to it, and
cut its head off. That lamb led a short but natural life on the hill and
died instantly. In the subsequent week we ate it all up. Of course this
is not a defence of halal killing in general, but to show that there can
be a principle behind slaughter that honours and celebrates the animal.

I don't understand the 'restrictive' bit at all. What's restrictive
about eating mostly vegetables, plus eggs and dairy, with the odd piece
of meat now and then? And no, we don't eat out these days except at
friends' houses and it would be rude to ask.

If you just don't like meat (which I gather from your sarcastic 'yum'),
then by all means don't eat it, but just as you clearly resent any
'theistic' aspects of the argument (not that I can imagine where any god
comes into it) so do I resent being preached at about the moral
turpitude of eating meat. Not getting at you personally, of course.
--
Kate B
London
Clive Arthur
2020-01-13 12:52:44 UTC
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On 13/01/2020 11:49, Kate B wrote:

<snipped>
Post by Kate B
and from me. Of course an animal can be humanely raised, with access to
natural grazing and foodstuffs, and not all cramped together in some
hangar. An animal can also be humanely slaughtered, where it is stunned
and unconscious before being killed. Yes I know there are and have been
abuses of this practice, as far as I can find out I do not buy meat from
such sources. In fact, even when it is not stunned first, it can be
humane: I meant it about the lamb - in a camp half-way up Nanga Parbat
we were greeted by friends of our hosts, one of whom looked like all the
pictures of the Good Shepherd you have ever seen, with a lamb on his
shoulders. After a bit he swung the lamb down, talking gently to it, and
cut its head off. That lamb led a short but natural life on the hill and
died instantly. In the subsequent week we ate it all up. Of course this
is not a defence of halal killing in general, but to show that there can
be a principle behind slaughter that honours and celebrates the animal.
I don't understand the 'restrictive' bit at all. What's restrictive
about eating mostly vegetables, plus eggs and dairy, with the odd piece
of meat now and then?  And no, we don't eat out these days except at
friends' houses and it would be rude to ask.
If you just don't like meat (which I gather from your sarcastic 'yum'),
then by all means don't eat it, but just as you clearly resent any
'theistic' aspects of the argument (not that I can imagine where any god
comes into it) so do I resent being preached at about the moral
turpitude of eating meat. Not getting at you personally, of course.
Imagine, for some reason, you had to kill a human. Would you chose the
happy contented one, or the one leading a life of misery in a cell?

And while meat eaters (meaters?) can of course eat all sorts, it is my
experience that in practice their diet is far more restricted than a
vegetarian. And generally less healthy, if that matters.

[FWIW I too kill animals by proxy, though only when in Texas, and while
I'm well past the stage of wanting to eat meat, I have to say that an
$80 10oz steak is very tasty. So it should be.]

Cheers
--
Clive
Kate B
2020-01-13 15:26:29 UTC
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Post by Clive Arthur
<snipped>
Post by Kate B
and from me. Of course an animal can be humanely raised, with access
to natural grazing and foodstuffs, and not all cramped together in
some hangar. An animal can also be humanely slaughtered, where it is
stunned and unconscious before being killed. Yes I know there are and
have been abuses of this practice, as far as I can find out I do not
buy meat from such sources. In fact, even when it is not stunned
first, it can be humane: I meant it about the lamb - in a camp
half-way up Nanga Parbat we were greeted by friends of our hosts, one
of whom looked like all the pictures of the Good Shepherd you have
ever seen, with a lamb on his shoulders. After a bit he swung the lamb
down, talking gently to it, and cut its head off. That lamb led a
short but natural life on the hill and died instantly. In the
subsequent week we ate it all up. Of course this is not a defence of
halal killing in general, but to show that there can be a principle
behind slaughter that honours and celebrates the animal.
I don't understand the 'restrictive' bit at all. What's restrictive
about eating mostly vegetables, plus eggs and dairy, with the odd
piece of meat now and then?  And no, we don't eat out these days
except at friends' houses and it would be rude to ask.
If you just don't like meat (which I gather from your sarcastic
'yum'), then by all means don't eat it, but just as you clearly resent
any 'theistic' aspects of the argument (not that I can imagine where
any god comes into it) so do I resent being preached at about the
moral turpitude of eating meat. Not getting at you personally, of course.
Imagine, for some reason, you had to kill a human.  Would you chose the
happy contented one, or the one leading a life of misery in a cell?
It would depend on whether I was then going to eat them or not. I don't
really see where this is going.
Post by Clive Arthur
And while meat eaters (meaters?) can of course eat all sorts, it is my
experience that in practice their diet is far more restricted than a
vegetarian.  And generally less healthy, if that matters.
Less healthy if they eat vast quantities of meat and little else. But
I'm not advocating that, as you know.
Post by Clive Arthur
[FWIW I too kill animals by proxy, though only when in Texas, and while
I'm well past the stage of wanting to eat meat, I have to say that an
$80 10oz steak is very tasty.  So it should be.]
I don't think I've ever been able to manage a 10 oz steak, and although
there are doubtless some good cattle producers in Texas, the reputation
of most US meat producers is more rank than tasty. Perfectly happy with
a 4 oz Scottish one from my local butcher who knows the farm it came from.
Post by Clive Arthur
Cheers
Slainte
--
Kate B
London
Tony Smith Gloucestershire
2020-01-14 09:11:51 UTC
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I have just seen a report on BBC Scotland about a Vagen kilt. Made of viscose thread rather than wool plus faux leather.
BrritSki
2020-01-14 11:15:14 UTC
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Post by Tony Smith Gloucestershire
I have just seen a report on BBC Scotland about a Vagen kilt. Made of viscose thread rather than wool plus faux leather.
Gwyneth Paltrow has one. She steam cleans it.
Mike
2020-01-14 11:41:30 UTC
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Post by BrritSki
Post by Tony Smith Gloucestershire
I have just seen a report on BBC Scotland about a Vagen kilt. Made of
viscose thread rather than wool plus faux leather.
Gwyneth Paltrow has one. She steam cleans it.
YMNWTKT but,.... the McMillan Tartan has 5 or more colour sets, one screams
at you with yellow and orange, the hunting tartan is far more subdued in
green and brown and there is also a very formal dress tartan.
--
Toodle Pip
Anne B
2020-01-14 16:41:52 UTC
Reply
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Post by Mike
Post by BrritSki
Post by Tony Smith Gloucestershire
I have just seen a report on BBC Scotland about a Vagen kilt. Made of
viscose thread rather than wool plus faux leather.
Gwyneth Paltrow has one. She steam cleans it.
YMNWTKT but,.... the McMillan Tartan has 5 or more colour sets, one screams
at you with yellow and orange, the hunting tartan is far more subdued in
green and brown and there is also a very formal dress tartan.
The Scottish Register of Tartans has 11 MacMillan tartans.


Interestingly, three of them are asymmetrical, which is unusual.


The basic sett (thread count) will be the same or similar in all of
them, with slight variations to distinguish one variety of MacMillan
from the others. It's only the dyes that differ, some being modern
(strong or bright colours), some ancient (replica of original vegetable
dyes) or mock faded or with some colours replaced for variation.

I once saw a rotund man (Leftpondian) prancing around in Fort William
wearing a complete outfit in Dress MacMillan (modern dye - the one that
screams at you), which is all canary yellow with scarlet checks - kilt,
waistcoat, jacket, plaid, bonnet and stockings, with a plain yellow
shirt and black shoes. It was quite a shock to the system.

Anne B
Mike
2020-01-14 16:53:48 UTC
Reply
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Post by Anne B
Post by Mike
Post by BrritSki
Post by Tony Smith Gloucestershire
I have just seen a report on BBC Scotland about a Vagen kilt. Made of
viscose thread rather than wool plus faux leather.
Gwyneth Paltrow has one. She steam cleans it.
YMNWTKT but,.... the McMillan Tartan has 5 or more colour sets, one screams
at you with yellow and orange, the hunting tartan is far more subdued in
green and brown and there is also a very formal dress tartan.
The Scottish Register of Tartans has 11 MacMillan tartans.
Interestingly, three of them are asymmetrical, which is unusual.
The basic sett (thread count) will be the same or similar in all of
them, with slight variations to distinguish one variety of MacMillan
from the others. It's only the dyes that differ, some being modern
(strong or bright colours), some ancient (replica of original vegetable
dyes) or mock faded or with some colours replaced for variation.
I once saw a rotund man (Leftpondian) prancing around in Fort William
wearing a complete outfit in Dress MacMillan (modern dye - the one that
screams at you), which is all canary yellow with scarlet checks - kilt,
waistcoat, jacket, plaid, bonnet and stockings, with a plain yellow
shirt and black shoes. It was quite a shock to the system.
Anne B
Do you feel that have got over the shock yet?!
--
Toodle Pip
Anne B
2020-01-14 18:54:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by Anne B
Post by Mike
Post by BrritSki
Post by Tony Smith Gloucestershire
I have just seen a report on BBC Scotland about a Vagen kilt. Made of
viscose thread rather than wool plus faux leather.
Gwyneth Paltrow has one. She steam cleans it.
YMNWTKT but,.... the McMillan Tartan has 5 or more colour sets, one screams
at you with yellow and orange, the hunting tartan is far more subdued in
green and brown and there is also a very formal dress tartan.
The Scottish Register of Tartans has 11 MacMillan tartans.
Interestingly, three of them are asymmetrical, which is unusual.
The basic sett (thread count) will be the same or similar in all of
them, with slight variations to distinguish one variety of MacMillan
from the others. It's only the dyes that differ, some being modern
(strong or bright colours), some ancient (replica of original vegetable
dyes) or mock faded or with some colours replaced for variation.
I once saw a rotund man (Leftpondian) prancing around in Fort William
wearing a complete outfit in Dress MacMillan (modern dye - the one that
screams at you), which is all canary yellow with scarlet checks - kilt,
waistcoat, jacket, plaid, bonnet and stockings, with a plain yellow
shirt and black shoes. It was quite a shock to the system.
Anne B
Do you feel that have got over the shock yet?!
Well, it certainly hasn't faded from my memory!

Anne B
Jim Easterbrook
2020-01-14 17:00:44 UTC
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Post by Anne B
I once saw a rotund man (Leftpondian) prancing around in Fort William
wearing a complete outfit in Dress MacMillan (modern dye - the one that
screams at you), which is all canary yellow with scarlet checks - kilt,
waistcoat, jacket, plaid, bonnet and stockings, with a plain yellow
shirt and black shoes. It was quite a shock to the system.
That reminds me of a Ronnie Scott joke (i.e. probably not original).
Someone came on stage in mismatched lumberjack check coat and trousers.
Ronnie looked at him and said "Somewhere in London tonight there is a
Ford Consul with no seat covers."
--
Jim <http://www.jim-easterbrook.me.uk/>
1959/1985? M B+ G+ A L- I- S- P-- CH0(p) Ar++ T+ H0 Q--- Sh0
Chris McMillan
2020-01-15 10:56:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Anne B
Post by Mike
Post by BrritSki
Post by Tony Smith Gloucestershire
I have just seen a report on BBC Scotland about a Vagen kilt. Made of
viscose thread rather than wool plus faux leather.
Gwyneth Paltrow has one. She steam cleans it.
YMNWTKT but,.... the McMillan Tartan has 5 or more colour sets, one screams
at you with yellow and orange, the hunting tartan is far more subdued in
green and brown and there is also a very formal dress tartan.
The Scottish Register of Tartans has 11 MacMillan tartans.
Interestingly, three of them are asymmetrical, which is unusual.
The basic sett (thread count) will be the same or similar in all of
them, with slight variations to distinguish one variety of MacMillan
from the others. It's only the dyes that differ, some being modern
(strong or bright colours), some ancient (replica of original vegetable
dyes) or mock faded or with some colours replaced for variation.
I once saw a rotund man (Leftpondian) prancing around in Fort William
wearing a complete outfit in Dress MacMillan (modern dye - the one that
screams at you), which is all canary yellow with scarlet checks - kilt,
waistcoat, jacket, plaid, bonnet and stockings, with a plain yellow
shirt and black shoes. It was quite a shock to the system.
Anne B
Certainly would be. I have a kilted skirt in bright yellow, maroon and
dark green. Himself has the tie in orange and yellow.

Sincerely Chris
Nick Odell
2020-01-14 11:41:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Tue, 14 Jan 2020 11:15:14 +0000, BrritSki
Post by BrritSki
Post by Tony Smith Gloucestershire
I have just seen a report on BBC Scotland about a Vagen kilt. Made of viscose thread rather than wool plus faux leather.
Gwyneth Paltrow has one. She steam cleans it.
Under candlelight, I suppose.

Nick
Mike
2020-01-14 11:58:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
On Tue, 14 Jan 2020 11:15:14 +0000, BrritSki
Post by BrritSki
Post by Tony Smith Gloucestershire
I have just seen a report on BBC Scotland about a Vagen kilt. Made of
viscose thread rather than wool plus faux leather.
Gwyneth Paltrow has one. She steam cleans it.
Under candlelight, I suppose.
Nick
Whilst waxing lyrical perhaps?
--
Toodle Pip
BrritSki
2020-01-14 12:42:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
On Tue, 14 Jan 2020 11:15:14 +0000, BrritSki
Post by BrritSki
Post by Tony Smith Gloucestershire
I have just seen a report on BBC Scotland about a Vagen kilt. Made of viscose thread rather than wool plus faux leather.
Gwyneth Paltrow has one. She steam cleans it.
Under candlelight, I suppose.
<https://www.unilad.co.uk/celebrity/gwyneth-paltrow-sold-out-of-candles-that-smell-like-my-vagina/?source=facebook>
Sid Nuncius
2020-01-14 18:37:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by BrritSki
Post by Tony Smith Gloucestershire
I have just seen a report on BBC Scotland about a Vagen kilt. Made of
viscose thread rather than wool plus faux leather.
Gwyneth Paltrow has one. She steam cleans it.
I found Kathy Burke's response very refreshing when, in one of her
excellent programmes last year, she was told about Ms Paltrow's habit:
"What, steam yer fanny? F*** off!"
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
m***@btopenworld.com
2020-01-15 20:06:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by BrritSki
It is not going well. Waife says it is not very filling and she needs
something more substantial inside her, so we are back to meat and two veg.
We are going to give dry January a try though...
I am enjoying a dry January. Mostly Dry Gin and Dry White Wine. Still scope for Dry Cider and Dry Martinis.
Sam Plusnet
2020-01-15 21:02:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Post by BrritSki
It is not going well. Waife says it is not very filling and she needs
something more substantial inside her, so we are back to meat and two veg.
We are going to give dry January a try though...
I am enjoying a dry January. Mostly Dry Gin and Dry White Wine. Still scope for Dry Cider and Dry Martinis.
Wish we could have a dry January.
It's been precipitating it down for days on end.
The garden's gone well past squelchy.
--
Sam Plusnet
Vicky Ayech
2020-01-15 22:23:29 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Post by BrritSki
It is not going well. Waife says it is not very filling and she needs
something more substantial inside her, so we are back to meat and two veg.
We are going to give dry January a try though...
I am enjoying a dry January. Mostly Dry Gin and Dry White Wine. Still scope for Dry Cider and Dry Martinis.
Wish we could have a dry January.
It's been precipitating it down for days on end.
The garden's gone well past squelchy.
Well, I hate snow and cold so wet is better.
Sid Nuncius
2020-01-16 09:52:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Wish we could have a dry January.
It's been precipitating it down for days on end.
The garden's gone well past squelchy.
That is an outstanding Rubbish Haiku! Well done, MOPMOB!
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Anne B
2020-01-15 21:30:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Post by BrritSki
It is not going well. Waife says it is not very filling and she needs
something more substantial inside her, so we are back to meat and two veg.
We are going to give dry January a try though...
I am enjoying a dry January. Mostly Dry Gin and Dry White Wine. Still scope for Dry Cider and Dry Martinis.
Dry Sack and Dry Sherry?

Anne B
Vicky Ayech
2020-01-15 22:22:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 15 Jan 2020 12:06:48 -0800 (PST),
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Post by BrritSki
It is not going well. Waife says it is not very filling and she needs
something more substantial inside her, so we are back to meat and two veg.
We are going to give dry January a try though...
I am enjoying a dry January. Mostly Dry Gin and Dry White Wine. Still scope for Dry Cider and Dry Martinis.
I had a sherry this evening but not a dry one. It was a bit full and
sweet. The bottle is almost empty. Maybe one left. I shall get a dryer
one next time.
Penny
2020-01-16 10:56:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 15 Jan 2020 12:06:48 -0800 (PST), ***@btopenworld.com
scrawled in the dust...
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Post by BrritSki
It is not going well. Waife says it is not very filling and she needs
something more substantial inside her, so we are back to meat and two veg.
We are going to give dry January a try though...
I am enjoying a dry January. Mostly Dry Gin and Dry White Wine. Still scope for Dry Cider and Dry Martinis.
Never one to go with the flow, I've had more alcoholic drinks this month
than in the previous three. I still expect this little bottle of chocolate
Baileys to last me all year.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Clive Arthur
2020-01-16 12:59:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On 16/01/2020 10:56, Penny wrote:

<snip>
Post by Penny
Never one to go with the flow, I've had more alcoholic drinks this month
than in the previous three. I still expect this little bottle of chocolate
Baileys to last me all year.
IME Baileys lasts for many, many years.
--
Cheers
Clive
Anne B
2020-01-16 16:00:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Kate B
<snip>
Post by Penny
Never one to go with the flow, I've had more alcoholic drinks this month
than in the previous three. I still expect this little bottle of chocolate
Baileys to last me all year.
IME Baileys lasts for many, many years.
Chez moi it would last an infinitely long time. Only Advocaat (sp?)
would outlive it.

Anne B
Vicky Ayech
2020-01-16 18:11:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 16 Jan 2020 16:00:34 +0000, Anne B
Post by Anne B
Post by Kate B
<snip>
Post by Penny
Never one to go with the flow, I've had more alcoholic drinks this month
than in the previous three. I still expect this little bottle of chocolate
Baileys to last me all year.
IME Baileys lasts for many, many years.
Chez moi it would last an infinitely long time. Only Advocaat (sp?)
would outlive it.
Anne B
I wouldn't open it in the first place. I'd give it away. But
Drambuie...that might go down well. Not had that for many years. They
used to have it on ships when I sailed with Capt Ex.
SODAM
2020-01-17 00:01:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 16 Jan 2020 16:00:34 +0000, l
But Drambuie...that might go down well.
Not had that for many years. They
used to have it on ships when I sailed with Capt Ex.
Good job we aren’t all the same. A bottle of Bailey’s would last me about a
month, unless I had female visitors, in which case it would disappear.
Co-incidentally, I’m sipping a Drambuie right now. It’s nice, but I prefer
Glayva. However, I finished that last week.

I’m trying to empty the drinks cupboard. There are three bottles of whisky,
which I hate, that have been there many years. One of them is Laphroig,
BTMS’ favourite, which I kept for her occasional progresses.[1] The aquavit
came from Norway about twenty years ago and the Ouzo Lord knows when - both
still unopened. There are others at the back that never see the light.

[1] umrats wil be glad to know that in her last months, I sent her a
bottle, from which she and Mr. BTMS had a nip of an evening, cheering them
both immensely.
--
SODAM
The thinking umrat’s choice for editor
Tony Smith Gloucestershire
2020-01-17 08:41:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Friday, 17 January 2020 00:01:39 UTC, SODAM wrote:

<snipped>
Post by SODAM
I’m trying to empty the drinks cupboard. There are three bottles of whisky,
which I hate, that have been there many years. One of them is Laphroig,
BTMS’ favourite, which I kept for her occasional progresses.[1] The aquavit
came from Norway about twenty years ago and the Ouzo Lord knows when - both
still unopened. There are others at the back that never see the light.
<snipped>

I gave a friend a bottle of Riga Black Balsam for his 80th (bought not in Riga but in Vilnius last spring).

It is an acquired taste.
Mike
2020-01-17 08:46:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Clive Arthur
<snipped>
Post by SODAM
I’m trying to empty the drinks cupboard. There are three bottles of whisky,
which I hate, that have been there many years. One of them is Laphroig,
BTMS’ favourite, which I kept for her occasional progresses.[1] The aquavit
came from Norway about twenty years ago and the Ouzo Lord knows when - both
still unopened. There are others at the back that never see the light.
<snipped>
I gave a friend a bottle of Riga Black Balsam for his 80th (bought not in
Riga but in Vilnius last spring).
It is an acquired taste.
The name suggests Horse Liniment to me.
--
Toodle Pip
Sam Plusnet
2020-01-17 19:24:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by Clive Arthur
<snipped>
Post by SODAM
I’m trying to empty the drinks cupboard. There are three bottles of whisky,
which I hate, that have been there many years. One of them is Laphroig,
BTMS’ favourite, which I kept for her occasional progresses.[1] The aquavit
came from Norway about twenty years ago and the Ouzo Lord knows when - both
still unopened. There are others at the back that never see the light.
<snipped>
I gave a friend a bottle of Riga Black Balsam for his 80th (bought not in
Riga but in Vilnius last spring).
It is an acquired taste.
The name suggests Horse Liniment to me.
Or something used to lubricate a turntable.
--
Sam Plusnet
Nick Odell
2020-01-17 09:02:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 16 Jan 2020 16:00:34 +0000, l
But Drambuie...that might go down well.
Not had that for many years. They
used to have it on ships when I sailed with Capt Ex.
Good job we aren’t all the same. A bottle of Bailey’s would last me about a
month, unless I had female visitors, in which case it would disappear.
Co-incidentally, I’m sipping a Drambuie right now. It’s nice, but I prefer
Glayva. However, I finished that last week.
I’m trying to empty the drinks cupboard. There are three bottles of whisky,
which I hate, that have been there many years. One of them is Laphroig,
BTMS’ favourite, which I kept for her occasional progresses.[1] The aquavit
came from Norway about twenty years ago and the Ouzo Lord knows when - both
still unopened. There are others at the back that never see the light.
[1] umrats wil be glad to know that in her last months, I sent her a
bottle, from which she and Mr. BTMS had a nip of an evening, cheering them
both immensely.
For helpful hints about whisky/whiskey disposal:
https://monologues.co.uk/Sketches/Down_the_Drain.htm

Nick
Penny
2020-01-17 09:03:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Fri, 17 Jan 2020 00:01:36 +0000, SODAM <***@talktalk.net> scrawled in
the dust...
Post by SODAM
On Thu, 16 Jan 2020 16:00:34 +0000, l
But Drambuie...that might go down well.
Not had that for many years. They
used to have it on ships when I sailed with Capt Ex.
Good job we aren’t all the same. A bottle of Bailey’s would last me about a
month, unless I had female visitors, in which case it would disappear.
Co-incidentally, I’m sipping a Drambuie right now. It’s nice, but I prefer
Glayva. However, I finished that last week.
I’m trying to empty the drinks cupboard. There are three bottles of whisky,
which I hate, that have been there many years. One of them is Laphroig,
I'm not a great fan of Drambuie but will accept it if nothing else is on
offer. Laphroig is one of the very few whiskies I would turn down. The
other is a weirdly oily one I've forgotten the name of. It came in an
interesting rectangular bottle, more like a decanter, and I bought the last
couple of measures and the bottle from a pub because I wanted the bottle.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Vicky Ayech
2020-01-17 09:17:56 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 16 Jan 2020 16:00:34 +0000, l
Good job we aren’t all the same. A bottle of Bailey’s would last me about a
month, unless I had female visitors, in which case it would disappear.
Co-incidentally, I’m sipping a Drambuie right now. It’s nice, but I prefer
Glayva. However, I finished that last week.
I’m trying to empty the drinks cupboard. There are three bottles of whisky,
I like Jamesons. Not most single malts though.
Once at a party we played blindfolded tastings. Jamesons, Tallisker
and Tescos blended and quite a few picked the Tescos or Jamesons as
the smooth single malt.
which I hate, that have been there many years. One of them is Laphroig,
BTMS’ favourite, which I kept for her occasional progresses.[1] The aquavit
came from Norway about twenty years ago and the Ouzo Lord knows when - both
still unopened. There are others at the back that never see the light.
I used to have 15 year Genever gin inthe fridge. Quite liked that for
a while. I don't really drink much now. About once a month or less.
[1] umrats wil be glad to know that in her last months, I sent her a
bottle, from which she and Mr. BTMS had a nip of an evening, cheering them
both immensely.
Yes, that is nice.
Chris McMillan
2020-01-17 14:24:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by SODAM
On Thu, 16 Jan 2020 16:00:34 +0000, l
But Drambuie...that might go down well.
Not had that for many years. They
used to have it on ships when I sailed with Capt Ex.
Good job we aren’t all the same. A bottle of Bailey’s would last me about a
month, unless I had female visitors, in which case it would disappear.
Co-incidentally, I’m sipping a Drambuie right now. It’s nice, but I prefer
Glayva. However, I finished that last week.
I’m trying to empty the drinks cupboard. There are three bottles of whisky,
which I hate, that have been there many years. One of them is Laphroig,
BTMS’ favourite, which I kept for her occasional progresses.[1] The aquavit
came from Norway about twenty years ago and the Ouzo Lord knows when - both
still unopened. There are others at the back that never see the light.
[1] umrats wil be glad to know that in her last months, I sent her a
bottle, from which she and Mr. BTMS had a nip of an evening, cheering them
both immensely.
Maybe you should continue to use it in memory of BTMS? With some choccie of
course.

Sincerely Chris
SODAM
2020-01-17 15:04:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by SODAM
[1] umrats wil be glad to know that in her last months, I sent her a
bottle, from which she and Mr. BTMS had a nip of an evening, cheering them
both immensely.
Maybe you should continue to use it in memory of BTMS? With some choccie of
course.
Can’t stand the stuff! Besides, I feel it’s her bottle, not mine. I’d no
more drink BTMS’ whisky than delete her emails.
--
SODAM
The thinking umrat’s choice for editor
Chris McMillan
2020-01-18 11:09:41 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by SODAM
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by SODAM
[1] umrats wil be glad to know that in her last months, I sent her a
bottle, from which she and Mr. BTMS had a nip of an evening, cheering them
both immensely.
Maybe you should continue to use it in memory of BTMS? With some choccie of
course.
Can’t stand the stuff! Besides, I feel it’s her bottle, not mine. I’d no
more drink BTMS’ whisky than delete her emails.
What a lovely tribute!

Sincerely Chris
krw
2020-01-17 20:59:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by SODAM
[1] umrats wil be glad to know that in her last months, I sent her a
bottle, from which she and Mr. BTMS had a nip of an evening, cheering them
both immensely.
Thank you for that thought.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Sam Plusnet
2020-01-17 19:31:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Thu, 16 Jan 2020 16:00:34 +0000, Anne B
Post by Anne B
Post by Kate B
<snip>
Post by Penny
Never one to go with the flow, I've had more alcoholic drinks this month
than in the previous three. I still expect this little bottle of chocolate
Baileys to last me all year.
IME Baileys lasts for many, many years.
Chez moi it would last an infinitely long time. Only Advocaat (sp?)
would outlive it.
Anne B
I wouldn't open it in the first place. I'd give it away. But
Drambuie...that might go down well. Not had that for many years. They
used to have it on ships when I sailed with Capt Ex.
Does anyrat know of a reliable way of disposing of those bottles of
spirit & liqueurs which are sometimes purchased in hopeful anticipation,
but set aside after a single glass?
Our drinks cupboard now has more bottles in this category than stuff we
actually drink.
We've tried offering them to friends & neighbours without result.
I have offered to tip them down the sink, but discarding anything is so
against Wofe's nature she won't hear of it
--
Sam Plusnet
Vicky Ayech
2020-01-17 21:39:02 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Thu, 16 Jan 2020 16:00:34 +0000, Anne B
Post by Anne B
Post by Kate B
<snip>
Post by Penny
Never one to go with the flow, I've had more alcoholic drinks this month
than in the previous three. I still expect this little bottle of chocolate
Baileys to last me all year.
IME Baileys lasts for many, many years.
Chez moi it would last an infinitely long time. Only Advocaat (sp?)
would outlive it.
Anne B
I wouldn't open it in the first place. I'd give it away. But
Drambuie...that might go down well. Not had that for many years. They
used to have it on ships when I sailed with Capt Ex.
Does anyrat know of a reliable way of disposing of those bottles of
spirit & liqueurs which are sometimes purchased in hopeful anticipation,
but set aside after a single glass?
Our drinks cupboard now has more bottles in this category than stuff we
actually drink.
We've tried offering them to friends & neighbours without result.
I have offered to tip them down the sink, but discarding anything is so
against Wofe's nature she won't hear of it
What have you got and where do you live?:)
krw
2020-01-17 21:57:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Thu, 16 Jan 2020 16:00:34 +0000, Anne B
Post by Anne B
Post by Kate B
<snip>
Post by Penny
Never one to go with the flow, I've had more alcoholic drinks this month
than in the previous three. I still expect this little bottle of chocolate
Baileys to last me all year.
IME Baileys lasts for many, many years.
Chez moi it would last an infinitely long time. Only Advocaat (sp?)
would outlive it.
Anne B
I wouldn't open it in the first place. I'd give it away. But
Drambuie...that might go down well. Not had that for many years. They
used to have it on ships when I sailed with Capt Ex.
Does anyrat know of a reliable way of disposing of those bottles of
spirit & liqueurs which are sometimes purchased in hopeful anticipation,
but set aside after a single glass?
Our drinks cupboard now has more bottles in this category than stuff we
actually drink.
We've tried offering them to friends & neighbours without result.
I have offered to tip them down the sink, but discarding anything is so
against Wofe's nature she won't hear of it
What have you got and where do you live?:)
YANAOU
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Sam Plusnet
2020-01-18 20:24:38 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Thu, 16 Jan 2020 16:00:34 +0000, Anne B
Post by Anne B
Post by Kate B
<snip>
Post by Penny
Never one to go with the flow, I've had more alcoholic drinks this month
than in the previous three. I still expect this little bottle of chocolate
Baileys to last me all year.
IME Baileys lasts for many, many years.
Chez moi it would last an infinitely long time. Only Advocaat (sp?)
would outlive it.
Anne B
I wouldn't open it in the first place. I'd give it away. But
Drambuie...that might go down well. Not had that for many years. They
used to have it on ships when I sailed with Capt Ex.
Does anyrat know of a reliable way of disposing of those bottles of
spirit & liqueurs which are sometimes purchased in hopeful anticipation,
but set aside after a single glass?
Our drinks cupboard now has more bottles in this category than stuff we
actually drink.
We've tried offering them to friends & neighbours without result.
I have offered to tip them down the sink, but discarding anything is so
against Wofe's nature she won't hear of it
What have you got and where do you live?:)
South Wales.
I'd have to do a stock take - but apart from (95% of a) bottle of Jack
Daniels (my folly) the rest are liqueurs (Amaretto is one but the rest
are umbrella)
--
Sam Plusnet
Vicky Ayech
2020-01-18 21:21:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Thu, 16 Jan 2020 16:00:34 +0000, Anne B
Post by Kate B
<snip>
against Wofe's nature she won't hear of it
What have you got and where do you live?:)
South Wales.
I'd have to do a stock take - but apart from (95% of a) bottle of Jack
Daniels (my folly) the rest are liqueurs (Amaretto is one but the rest
are umbrella)
JD would be acceptable. Also Drambuie, Tia Maria, and there is another
chocolate one...
Penny
2020-01-18 23:42:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sat, 18 Jan 2020 21:21:23 +0000, Vicky Ayech <***@gmail.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Thu, 16 Jan 2020 16:00:34 +0000, Anne B
Post by Kate B
<snip>
against Wofe's nature she won't hear of it
What have you got and where do you live?:)
South Wales.
I'd have to do a stock take - but apart from (95% of a) bottle of Jack
Daniels (my folly) the rest are liqueurs (Amaretto is one but the rest
are umbrella)
JD would be acceptable. Also Drambuie, Tia Maria, and there is another
chocolate one...
I thought Aunty Mary was coffee.
I used to love Cointreau but orange is on the list of migraine triggers
(along with coffee).
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Sally Thompson
2020-01-20 16:35:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Thu, 16 Jan 2020 16:00:34 +0000, Anne B
Post by Anne B
Post by Kate B
<snip>
Post by Penny
Never one to go with the flow, I've had more alcoholic drinks this month
than in the previous three. I still expect this little bottle of chocolate
Baileys to last me all year.
IME Baileys lasts for many, many years.
Chez moi it would last an infinitely long time. Only Advocaat (sp?)
would outlive it.
Anne B
I wouldn't open it in the first place. I'd give it away. But
Drambuie...that might go down well. Not had that for many years. They
used to have it on ships when I sailed with Capt Ex.
Does anyrat know of a reliable way of disposing of those bottles of
spirit & liqueurs which are sometimes purchased in hopeful anticipation,
but set aside after a single glass?
Our drinks cupboard now has more bottles in this category than stuff we
actually drink.
We've tried offering them to friends & neighbours without result.
I have offered to tip them down the sink, but discarding anything is so
against Wofe's nature she won't hear of it
What have you got and where do you live?:)
South Wales.
I'd have to do a stock take - but apart from (95% of a) bottle of Jack
Daniels (my folly) the rest are liqueurs (Amaretto is one but the rest
are umbrella)
Oooh. I make a wicked Amaretto ice cream. Roughly which bit of South Wales?
Asking for a friend of course.
--
Sally in Shropshire, UK
Sam Plusnet
2020-01-20 20:04:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Thu, 16 Jan 2020 16:00:34 +0000, Anne B
Post by Anne B
Post by Kate B
<snip>
Post by Penny
Never one to go with the flow, I've had more alcoholic drinks this month
than in the previous three. I still expect this little bottle of chocolate
Baileys to last me all year.
IME Baileys lasts for many, many years.
Chez moi it would last an infinitely long time. Only Advocaat (sp?)
would outlive it.
Anne B
I wouldn't open it in the first place. I'd give it away. But
Drambuie...that might go down well. Not had that for many years. They
used to have it on ships when I sailed with Capt Ex.
Does anyrat know of a reliable way of disposing of those bottles of
spirit & liqueurs which are sometimes purchased in hopeful anticipation,
but set aside after a single glass?
Our drinks cupboard now has more bottles in this category than stuff we
actually drink.
We've tried offering them to friends & neighbours without result.
I have offered to tip them down the sink, but discarding anything is so
against Wofe's nature she won't hear of it
What have you got and where do you live?:)
South Wales.
I'd have to do a stock take - but apart from (95% of a) bottle of Jack
Daniels (my folly) the rest are liqueurs (Amaretto is one but the rest
are umbrella)
Oooh. I make a wicked Amaretto ice cream. Roughly which bit of South Wales?
Asking for a friend of course.
The badlands north of Pontypool.
--
Sam Plusnet
Clive Arthur
2020-01-18 00:47:17 UTC
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On 17/01/2020 19:31, Sam Plusnet wrote:

<snip>
Post by Sam Plusnet
Does anyrat know of a reliable way of disposing of those bottles of
spirit & liqueurs which are sometimes purchased in hopeful anticipation,
but set aside after a single glass?
Give them to an alcoholic beggar. It may cure them.
--
Cheers
Clive
SODAM
2020-01-18 01:20:44 UTC
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Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Thu, 16 Jan 2020 16:00:34 +0000, Anne B
Post by Anne B
Post by Kate B
<snip>
Post by Penny
Never one to go with the flow, I've had more alcoholic drinks this month
than in the previous three. I still expect this little bottle of chocolate
Baileys to last me all year.
IME Baileys lasts for many, many years.
Chez moi it would last an infinitely long time. Only Advocaat (sp?)
would outlive it.
Anne B
I wouldn't open it in the first place. I'd give it away. But
Drambuie...that might go down well. Not had that for many years. They
used to have it on ships when I sailed with Capt Ex.
Does anyrat know of a reliable way of disposing of those bottles of
spirit & liqueurs which are sometimes purchased in hopeful anticipation,
but set aside after a single glass?
Our drinks cupboard now has more bottles in this category than stuff we
actually drink.
We've tried offering them to friends & neighbours without result.
I have offered to tip them down the sink, but discarding anything is so
against Wofe's nature she won't hear of it
I’ll trade you aquavit, Ouzo and whisky for Glayva, Bailey’s, Drambuie and
Cointreau.
--
SODAM
The thinking umrat’s choice for editor
Penny
2020-01-16 21:31:02 UTC
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On Thu, 16 Jan 2020 16:00:34 +0000, Anne B <***@btinternet.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Anne B
Post by Kate B
<snip>
Post by Penny
Never one to go with the flow, I've had more alcoholic drinks this month
than in the previous three. I still expect this little bottle of chocolate
Baileys to last me all year.
IME Baileys lasts for many, many years.
Chez moi it would last an infinitely long time. Only Advocaat (sp?)
would outlive it.
Chacun à son goût, as they say. This is chocolate Baileys, I rather like
it, it was a present from D#2. I also got some Booja Booja truffles which
won't last quite so long but I suppose might also count as alcohol.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
John Ashby
2020-01-16 21:51:49 UTC
Reply
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Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Anne B
Post by Kate B
<snip>
Post by Penny
Never one to go with the flow, I've had more alcoholic drinks this month
than in the previous three. I still expect this little bottle of chocolate
Baileys to last me all year.
IME Baileys lasts for many, many years.
Chez moi it would last an infinitely long time. Only Advocaat (sp?)
would outlive it.
Chacun à son goût, as they say. This is chocolate Baileys, I rather like
it, it was a present from D#2. I also got some Booja Booja truffles which
won't last quite so long but I suppose might also count as alcohol.
Are they made of several Snarks?

john
Sid Nuncius
2020-01-17 06:00:13 UTC
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Post by John Ashby
Post by Penny
I also got some Booja Booja truffles which
won't last quite so long but I suppose might also count as alcohol.
Are they made of several Snarks?
Well, they do softly and suddenly vanish away...
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
BrritSki
2020-01-16 17:29:06 UTC
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Post by Kate B
<snip>
Post by Penny
Never one to go with the flow, I've had more alcoholic drinks this month
than in the previous three. I still expect this little bottle of chocolate
Baileys to last me all year.
IME Baileys lasts for many, many years.
I kill [1] our bottles very quickly in memory of Mum.

[1] humanely of course
Clive Arthur
2020-01-16 18:11:47 UTC
Reply
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Post by BrritSki
Post by Kate B
<snip>
Post by Penny
Never one to go with the flow, I've had more alcoholic drinks this month
than in the previous three. I still expect this little bottle of chocolate
Baileys to last me all year.
IME Baileys lasts for many, many years.
I kill [1] our bottles very quickly in memory of Mum.
[1] humanely of course
My dad was an alcoholic. He drank large quantities of just about
anything usually two or three different drinks at a time. When we
cleared out his house, the only untouched bottles, about half a dozen,
were Baileys and similar, all gifts.

I once saw a recipe aimed at parents wanting to save money at their
daughters' parties. Basically, a shot of espresso, condensed milk and a
little whiskey. Or whisky. Or meths probably.
--
Cheers
Clive
Nick Odell
2020-01-17 08:52:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 16 Jan 2020 18:11:47 +0000, Clive Arthur
<***@nowaytoday.co.uk> wrote:
<snip>
Post by Clive Arthur
I once saw a recipe aimed at parents wanting to save money at their
daughters' parties. Basically, a shot of espresso, condensed milk and a
little whiskey. Or whisky. Or meths probably.
Is it wise to give espresso to a three-year-old?

Nick
Penny
2020-01-17 09:07:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Fri, 17 Jan 2020 08:52:55 +0000, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
On Thu, 16 Jan 2020 18:11:47 +0000, Clive Arthur
<snip>
Post by Clive Arthur
I once saw a recipe aimed at parents wanting to save money at their
daughters' parties. Basically, a shot of espresso, condensed milk and a
little whiskey. Or whisky. Or meths probably.
Is it wise to give espresso to a three-year-old?
Definitely not. The recipe my daughter was given, along with the
ingredients, used Camp coffee - she didn't like it. I think the bottle of
Camp was discarded when I moved house.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Jane Vernon
2020-01-23 16:31:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Kate B
<snip>
Post by Penny
Never one to go with the flow, I've had more alcoholic drinks this month
than in the previous three. I still expect this little bottle of chocolate
Baileys to last me all year.
IME Baileys lasts for many, many years.
IME it goes off after several months.
--
Jane
The Potter in the Purple socks - to reply, please remove PURPLE
BTME

http://www.clothandclay.co.uk/umra/cookbook.htm - Umrats' recipes
Nick Odell
2020-01-17 08:58:57 UTC
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Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Post by BrritSki
It is not going well. Waife says it is not very filling and she needs
something more substantial inside her, so we are back to meat and two veg.
We are going to give dry January a try though...
I am enjoying a dry January. Mostly Dry Gin and Dry White Wine. Still scope for Dry Cider and Dry Martinis.
Never one to go with the flow, I've had more alcoholic drinks this month
than in the previous three. I still expect this little bottle of chocolate
Baileys to last me all year.
A little mote of Baileys never did anyone any harm, as my cousin used
to say.

Nick
Sid Nuncius
2020-01-17 09:26:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
A little mote of Baileys never did anyone any harm, as my cousin used
to say.
:o)) Very neat.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Steve Hague
2020-01-18 09:42:44 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by m***@btopenworld.com
Post by BrritSki
It is not going well. Waife says it is not very filling and she needs
something more substantial inside her, so we are back to meat and two veg.
We are going to give dry January a try though...
I am enjoying a dry January. Mostly Dry Gin and Dry White Wine. Still scope for Dry Cider and Dry Martinis.
Never one to go with the flow, I've had more alcoholic drinks this month
than in the previous three. I still expect this little bottle of chocolate
Baileys to last me all year.
A little mote of Baileys never did anyone any harm, as my cousin used
to say.
Nick
SIL drinks the Tesco version of Baileys, which she says tastes identical
at half the price. I wouldn't know, I can't stand the stuff.
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